Emergency Care Refresher

Written by DAN Staff

Being able to quickly and correctly provide emergency care during a dive incident can be the difference between a positive outcome and a fatality. Regardless of your level of personal experience with emergency management and response, providing adequate care requires regular refreshers of even the most basic skills, such as measuring vital signs. Accurate assessment of an individual’s condition not only provides EMS personnel with a good baseline for care, but can also help expedite needed medical interventions, and provide a valuable timeline of a patient’s condition. How well do you know your basic life support skills? 

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Time

Time is a fundamental metric in emergency response. Regularly recording the patient’s condition and the corresponding time is important to creating an accurate timeline of the patient’s symptoms. A timeline can be used to determine whether the patient’s condition is worsening and can dictate medical interventions. Seriously ill patients should have their vital signs reassessed every few minutes, while patients who are stable may reasonably have their vitals checked less frequently.

Level of Responsiveness

A patient’s level of responsiveness (LOR) can be one of the most revealing indicators of well-being. LOR is generally measured with four basic questions:

  • What is your name?
  • Where are we?
  • What time is it?
  • What happened?

If an individual can answer all of these questions with reasonable accuracy, you can quantify the LOR as “Alert and Oriented to Person, Place, Time, and Event,” which is frequently written as “A+Ox4.” In the event that a person can’t respond to these, or is unconscious, you can further measure LOR by determining if the patient is responsive to verbal or physical stimuli. While this measurement may provide useful information to professional responders, it’s not likely to change the care  you provide as a dive professional.

Pulse

Pulse can be a very effective indicator of an individual’s wellness, especially if you measure strength and regularity of the beat in addition to frequency. To assess a pulse, place two fingers gently on either the carotid artery on the neck, or on a patient’s wrist just beneath the base of their thumb. If you difficulty finding a pulse, first confirm the location of your fingers, and then make sure you aren’t pressing too hard or too gently. Note not just the speed at which the heart beats, but also the strength and regularity of the beat, these can be important factors when determining injury severity.

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Respiration

Constantly monitoring a patient’s breathing is a crucial emergency care step. Because many people will alter their breathing if they know you’re trying to count their breaths, begin counting respirations immediately after measuring the patient’s pulse. Pay close attention to the sound of breath and listen for wheezing, gasping, or labored breathing. These can indicate the existence of specific conditions and be valuable information for healthcare personnel.

For more information on diver health and safety visit diversalertnetwork.org.

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I Love My PADI Pro Contest 2018

I Heart PADI Pro B2B Blog Graphic

As PADI Professionals, you not only introduce new divers to the underwater world, but you inspire new passions, encourage exploration, and mobilize future conservationists. We recognize the difference you are making in your communities, and we would like to give your students the opportunity to show their appreciation by nominating you in the I Love My PADI Pro contest.

We’ve asked our divers to tell us about the impact their PADI Pro has made in their lives and, if they nominate you, you’ll automatically go in the running to win a PADI x Seiko watch (and they’ll have the chance to win PADI swag). PADI divers can visit the official I Love My PADI Pro contest page to submit their entry.

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Want to help spread the word? Below are a few sample text options to share on your social media accounts, in email, or on your website to encourage your students to participate. Remember, you know yourself and your students the best. If these samples don’t exactly match your tone and voice, feel free to adjust them accordingly. Don’t forget the official hashtag for the contest: #Love4PADIPros

Sample Text:

Option 1: Have you heard about @PADI’s #Love4PADIPros contest? If you thought I was a great PADI <insert level of membership>, you can nominate me by using this link: http://padi.co/NBiJYd.

Option 2: We have a lot of love for our PADI Pros here and we know you do too. If you think your instructor went above and beyond – or one of our Divemasters always has a smile at the ready, let them know by nominating them for @PADI’s #Love4PADIPros contest here: http://padi.co/NBiJYd.

Option 3: @PADI has just launched their #Love4PADIPros contest! If you think one of our PADI Pros deserves a shoutout (and a Seiko watch!) nominate them in the contest today here: http://padi.co/NBiJYd.

PADI Social Channels:

Facebook

Twitter @padi

Instagram @paditv

Seiko Social Channels:

Facebook

Instagram @seikowatchusa

To download other social images and sample posts, please visit the PADI Pros’ Site.

We appreciate all that you do and look forward to hearing from your students!

The Great Northern Dive Show – 17th – 18th Feb

 

great northern dive show

With January out of the way, it’s now that time of year for “The Great Northern Dive Show” this year running over the weekend of the 17th – 18th February at the Emirates Old Trafford. Lancashire County Cricket Club, The Point, Talbot Road, Manchester, M16 0PX.

The Great Northern Dive Show wide will have a variety of guest speakers including PADI Course Director’s Tracy Timperley from Academy Divers and Claire Dutton from Vivian Diving Centre.

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PADI’s very own Regional Training Consultant, Emily Petley-Jones, will also be presenting. Emily will be discussing diving opportunities for children. Emily’s presentation will also include information about PADI’s Approved Youth Training Scheme (AYTS). If you are interested in being an Approved Youth Training Centre and the marketing support this scheme brings, please email your PADI Regional Manager.

Along with a whole host of manufacturers who are exhibiting at the show,
there will be a great number of PADI Dive Centres who are there to support you;
Academy Divers
Blue Planet Aquarium
Coral Cay Conservation
Dive Manchester
Dive Style 
Divers Warehouse
Divewise 
Duttons Divers
H2O Divers
Robin Hood Watersports
Scuba Leeds
Techwise
Vivian Diving Centre
Wreck Finder Charters

Ruth and the team like to do things differently and will have Actors Ross Mullan and Ross O’Hennessy dressed to impress as Game of Thrones characters.

So if you are looking for something to do over the 17th – 18th February then pop along to The Great Northern Dive Show.
Saturday: 9.30am until 4.30pm
Sunday: 9.30am until 3.30pm

PADI Member Forum 2018

PADI, its global network of divers, professional members and dive centers have a responsibility to be a force for good in a constantly changing world.  To this end, PADI Member Forum 2018 promises to be truly inspiring as we share with you PADI’s vision for the future and your role in our mission to be best in and for the world.

We will look back at 2017 and then forward to a year that promises to be exciting and innovative for you and your divers.  Member Forum Topics* include:

  • 2017 Year in Review
  • New for 2018
  • PADI Standards and New Programs
  • Risk Management
  • Course Pricing
  • NEW My PADI Club
  • Project AWARE

Register Now

Attendance will count as one seminar credit. Registration is free but pre-registration is recommended.

Dates and locations are subject to change and are continuously being added, please check back frequently.

We look forward to 2018 and another year of striving to be best in and for the world.

*Topics subject to change

New PADI Adaptive Techniques Instructor Specialty Course in Dubai

PADI’s philosophy towards diver education has always been inclusive. As long as students meet the prerequisites of a course, they are welcome to enrol regardless of physical or mental challenges. To build on that foundation, PADI has recently launched a series of new courses aimed at techniques to apply when training or diving with physically and mentally challenged divers.

PADI Adaptive Techniques Instructor Specialty Course – open to PADI Open Water Scuba Instructors and above, this course allows successful candidates to teach the PADI Adaptive Techniques Specialty Course (details below) to other PADI Pros, and also teach the sub-course, PADI Adaptive Support Diver Specialty (details below), to divers.

PADI Adaptive Techniques Specialty Course – open to PADI Master Freedivers or PADI Divemasters and above, this course focuses on increasing awareness of varying abilities, and explores adaptive teaching techniques to apply when training and diving with physically and mentally challenged divers.

PADI Adaptive Support Diver Specialty – a subset of the PADI Adaptive Techniques Specialty Course, the PADI Adaptive Support Diver Specialty is open to divers who want to learn how they can best support dive buddies who have physical or mental challenges.


Sign up for the Instructor Specialty Course


As part of the launch of this series of courses, PADI Staff will be conducting EMEA’s first PADI Adaptive Techniques Instructor Specialty Course in Dubai on 2nd and 3rd March 2018. This new course is aimed at PADI Instructors wanting to not only learn adaptive techniques themselves, but who also want to teach the Adaptive Techniques Specialty course to other PADI Professionals.

To sign up for this unique course, please complete this application form and return it to id.emea@padi.com.


Find out more


 

Take Part in the Fourth Annual PADI Women’s Dive Day on Saturday 21 July 2018

For the past three years, divers from every corner of the globe have come together for PADI Women’s Dive Day to bond over their love of the ocean and a passion for diving. This growing tradition will continue on 21 July 2018, further strengthening and supporting the female dive community through a day of fun, adventure and camaraderie.

PADI Dive Centers and Resorts hosted more than 884 events in 85 countries last year for the third annual PADI Women’s Dive Day on 15 July 2017. Since the 2015 inaugural event, the celebration has continued to gain momentum as new and experienced divers gear up for everything from high tea on the high seas to shark dives and underwater cleanups. As a result, PADI female certifications increased noticeably year over year.

This was possible thanks to the enthusiasm and participation from PADI Members around the world who got behind this initiative. Let’s do it again for 2018, only bigger. More new divers. More ambassadors for the underwater world.

Participate in PADI Women’s Dive Day 2018 to strengthen and grow the female dive community, attract new women to the sports of scuba diving and freediving, and motivate existing female divers to get back in the water and continue their dive training.


Start planning your 2018 PADI Women’s Dive Day event on 21 July 2018 using these simple steps. 

  1. Decide what type of event to host. The type of event to host is completely up to you! Whether you conduct PADI Women’s Dive Day themed courses, have a family-oriented open day, host fun dives or even a girls’ night out with your divers, only your imagination limits your event.
  2. PADI Retail and Resort Members, register your event on the PADI Women’s Dive Day Event Locator. By registering your event, your dive center/resort will be included on the Event Locator at padi.com/women-dive.  To register your event, ensure you are logged into the Pros’ Site with your PADI Dive Center or Resort account (not an Individual Member account), go to ‘My Account’ page of the PADI Pros’ Site, and click on ‘Register your Women’s Dive Day event(s)’. Follow the on-screen instructions to quickly and easily add your event.
  3. PADI Professionals hosting an event not affiliated with a dive center/resort are encouraged to share their event information with their regional PADI office (PADI Americas: womendive@padi.com; PADI Asia Pacific: marketing@padi.com.au; PADI EMEA: marketing.emea@padi.com).
  4. Promote your event. Use different platforms to help get the word out about your event – email, social media, advertisements (print, online and in-store), and event calendars. Be sure to tag your social posts with #padiwomen to be part of the global conversation.
  5. Post Event Follow-Up. Follow up with all your PADI Women’s Dive Day event participants afterward. A simple “thanks for being with us” keeps divers engaged and encourages them to continue diving with you. Don’t forget to include links, telephone and a call to action. And be sure your success stories and photos with the marketing team at your PADI Regional Headquarters! Tag event photos that you post on social media with #padiwomen to feed into PADI’s social channels.

PADI Retail and Resort Members: Register your 2018 PADI Women’s Dive Day event now! 

Whale sharks of the Maldives

‘What is it? A shark? A whale? Whatever it is it’s massive!’

The whale shark is the biggest fish in the ocean, and therefore is also the biggest shark. It is one of three species of filter feeding shark; also including the basking shark and the mega mouth shark. On the 7th January we were lucky enough to spot Pedro who is a juvenile male at six metres. It was a truly breath taking moment! The best time to look for a whale shark is three to five hours before high tide and a few days before the full moon. However, finding a whale shark cannot be a guaranteed experience.

For many, seeing a whale shark is a once in a lifetime experience, with a place at the top of numerous bucket lists. These enigmatic and gentle creatures can be seen year round in South Ari Atoll, only a short seaplane ride from Gili Lankanfushi. The whale sharks are attracted to South Ari Atoll due to the vicinity of the Chagos-Laccadive Plateau, which provides very deep and highly nutrient rich water. Whale sharks are a pelagic species, able to travel around 100 miles per day and dive to at least 1600m – probably deeper, but this cannot be officially recorded due to tracking tags breaking under the phenomenal pressure at great depth.

Whale sharks are fascinating animals that predate the dinosaurs by 220 million years. All sharks, including the whale shark are cartilaginous fish, which means that their skeletons are made from cartilage, not bone. As with all sharks the whale shark’s skin is covered by dermal denticles, a substance more like teeth than fish scales. The dermal denticles are a couple of millimetres thick and protect the shark’s skin from damage and parasites. They also provide better hydrodynamics. Under this layer of protective armour is a fatty layer, around 10 to 15 cm thick that is most likely used as an energy store and protection from injuries, together with insulation during deeper dives. Whale sharks have over 300 rows of tiny replaceable teeth which are made from a stronger version of dermal denticles. Scientists are still debating the use of these teeth as whale sharks are filter feeders so their teeth are not required for feeding. Another anatomical feature which perplexes scientists is that the whale shark has spiracles. These are a breathing aid for stationary sharks, but the whale shark is classified as a highly mobile shark so what is the use? It could be that the whale shark is very closely related to bottom dwelling sharks, and it is a feature that will eventually disappear through evolution, or it could be used on the rare occasions that the shark is stationary and not feeding.

Whale sharks are known to make seasonal feeding aggregations in 20 countries, including Australia, Gulf of Mexico, Belize, Gulf of California, Seychelles and Maldives. Whale sharks feed on microscopic plankton and small fish that they suck into their one and half metre wide mouths. Their throats are much smaller in comparison; around the size of a drain pipe. They have two known methods for feeding, ram filtration and suction feeding. Suction feeding allows whale sharks to feed on more mobile prey such as small fishes, which they actively suck into their mouths, together with volumes of water that are then expelled through their gills. By comparison ram feeding is passive; the shark swims through the water with their mouth open and plankton filters in. It has been suggested that whale sharks are more suited to suction filter feeding because the gaps between their five to seven gills are small. This small gap is more effective at filtering out plankton when the shark is suction feeding. Whale sharks have very weak eyesight, they can probably only see three meters away, and so rely on their nostrils to find prey. Their nostrils are very sensitive due to their well-developed olfactory capsules; they can detect chemicals in the water produced by their planktonic prey.

Plankton tend to shelter at depths between 100 – 200m. This is the oxygen minimum zone and is not a suitable habitat for many organisms which would prey on them. Whale sharks however are able to feed at these depths and will spend the majority of their time between 50 – 250m. They do venture to deeper depths where the temperature drops to 3 degrees Celsius but scientists believe that due to the infrequency of these dives this is related to parasite removal, not feeding. Whale sharks cannot internally control their body temperature and so return to the surface to warm up and reload oxygen. This is why they can be found in the shallow waters around South Ari Atoll. During this warming and reloading period the sharks can be impaired cognitively and physically which explains their sluggish and relaxed behaviour.

Due to the sluggish behaviour of whale sharks and the shallow depths they travel in they are under threats from boats. It is estimated that 67% of whale sharks have injuries ranging from scratches to amputations. The effects of pollution, poor waste management and increased sedimentation on the whale shark population have not yet been suitably evaluated. Another issue is disturbances to their habitat resulting from tourism – if the guidelines for whale shark encounters are not followed the sharks can negatively be affected. For example, if a large group of tourists are crowding a shark it can cause the shark to dive before it has properly warmed up and reloaded oxygen. Adult whale sharks can also be targeted by great white sharks and orcas, whilst babies have been found in the stomachs of blue sharks and swordfish. In some parts of the world whale sharks are hunted for their meat and fins. In 2010 the Maldives implemented a ban on all forms of shark fishing. However, due to the longevity of whale sharks it will take many years for the population to return to optimal levels.

It is estimated that whale sharks can live between 70 – 100 years, reaching sexual maturity after 25 years at a size of eight to nine metres. Although some people report sightings of whale sharks up to 18 metres in length the largest confirmed has been 12.65m. It is easy to identify a male whale shark because when it has reached sexual maturity their sexual organs have a ragged appearance called claspers which extend past their pelvic fin. The whale shark is classified as ovoviviparous which means that they produce eggs which hatch inside the body. A female whale shark can store sperm for many months and can have babies at different stages of development. For example a female was found with 300 embryos at numerous stages of development. Due to whale sharks storing sperm and having babies at different stages of development the gestation period is unknown. Upon birth the pups are around half a metre in size and weight one kilo.

Whilst whale sharks are regularly sighted, 98% of these sightings are juvenile males with a length of six metres. At any one point it is estimated that there are 200 whale sharks in the waters of the Maldives. The most common behaviour observed of these sharks is cruising, only 12% of encounters are feeding.

We can’t wait to show you these gentle giants next time you are at Gili Lankanfushi. Please ask your Mr/Ms Friday and we can book a trip for you.  When you see one be sure to snap a photo of the checkerboard pattern on their side by their pectoral fins. This can help us with identification and research.

For more information and to upload your whale shark encounters please visit: https://maldiveswhalesharkresearch.org/

PADI’s guest blogger Emma Bell introduces herself:

I am a marine biologist and scuba diver from England. I have had the privilege of working in Greece, Seychelles and Maldives. I have worked in an aquaculture research centre where I focused on hormonal manipulation of a pelagic fish species. In addition, I have experience with coral restoration projects including frames and ropes; habitat restoration – crown of thorns, drupella and invasive plant species removal; educational activities and social media updates including blogs. I have also monitored population dynamics of bird, turtle, shark and cetacean species to aid in their conservation. I started my career working in the Maldives and I have done a round trip via Greece, England and Seychelles, I hope to increase my skills set and knowledge further whilst I am at Gili Lankanfushi, Maldives.

Adopt A Dive Site in The Middle East and North Africa

It doesn’t matter if you are a professional diver or a certified diver …as divers we have the passion, the access to the underwater world and the skills to become real ocean advocates!

We are a powerful movement which, through our actions of reporting and collecting valuable data can make the ocean safer for marine life, and more importantly, help inform policy change.

To further mobilize the citizen scientists, Project AWARE in 2016 launched the Adopt A Dive Site™ program.

Adopt A Dive Site is a unique and powerful program to involve dive centers, resorts and leaders around the world in ongoing, local protection and monitoring of local dive sites: participants commit to carry out monthly Dive Against Debris surveys, reporting types and quantities of marine debris found underwater each month from the same location.

To support Adopt a Dive Site participants, Project Aware will provide a full suite of survey tools to help implement their actions, a yearly report on the state of your local dive site and recognition tools for dive centers, resorts and leaders to share their stewardship with local customers and community.

We have a total of 15 adopted dive sites in The Middle East and North Africa, and we are looking forward to increasing this number!

Here are the PADI Pros and Dive centers who have made a commitment to their local dive sites through the Adopt A Dive Site program:

  • ADS44 – Abu Dhabi Steel Blocks, Saeed Majed, Abu Dhabi
  • ADS170 – House Reef, Natalie Sjostrom, Divers Down, Dubai
  • ADS226 – Dibba Rock, The Palms Dive Center, Dubai
  • ADS232 – Alga Wreck, Archimede Diving Center, Djerba
  • ADS240 – Ricardo Wreck, Archimede Diving Center, Djerba
  • ADS241 – Ras Taguermess Rocks, Archimede Diving Center, Djerba
  • ADS253 – Sheraton Red Sea Resort, Issam Kanafani, Jeddah
  • ADS265 – King Abdullah’s Reef, Marlee Thomas, Camel Dive Center, Jordan
  • ADS268 – Dibba Rock, Hassan Khayal, Dubai
  • ADS269 – Inchcape 1, Kholousi Khayal, Dubai
  • ADS277 – Dream Beach, Muneeb Ur Rehman, Professional Zone, Jeddah
  • ADS280 – Snoopy Island, Annie Halloran, The Dive Centre – Dubai
  • ADS314 – Shark Island, Hassan Khayal, Dubai
  • ADS382 – Dibba Rock, Kayleigh Hyslop, Freestyle Divers, Dubai
  • ADS387 – Artificial Reef, Kayleigh Hyslop, Freestyle Divers, Dubai

What are you waiting for? Adopt A Dive Site™

PADI Business Academy Returns in 2018!

PADI Business Academy

We are pleased to announce that the PADI Business Academy seminars will return in 2018. This series of two day seminars will kick off in Jeddah, Saudi Arabia, in March.

The PADI Business Academy is a combination of presentations and hands-on workshops. You’ll explore digital marketing strategies for your website and social media channels. As well as ideas and strategies for your business relating to sales and customer service to assist in supercharging your dive operation in 2018 and beyond.

Presentation Topics

Over the course of a PADI Business Academy, attendees have previously learned about and honed their knowledge on websites, social media and sales and pricing strategy. These core subjects are key to the success of a dive center as consumer journeys increasingly begin online. In addition to these core subjects, attendees will develop their awareness of in-store design, consumer behaviour and Customer Relationship Management systems.

PADI Business Academy Schedule 2018*

Day Month Location Language
9-10 March Jeddah, Saudia Arabia Arabic/English
14-15 March Hurghada, Egypt Arabic/English
29-30 March Stone Town, Zanzibar English
TBD March Leeds, United Kingdom English
6-7 April Aqaba, Jordan Arabic/English
TBD April Bristol, United Kingdom English
TBD April Brussels, Belgium French
TBD April Silema/St. Pauls, Malta English
18-19 May Madrid, Spain Spanish
26-27 May Barcelona, Spain Spanish
TBD May Edinburgh, United Kingdom English
TBD May Lisbon, Portugal Portugal
22-23 August Dubai, UAE Arabic/English
TBD October Maldives English
TBD November Dublin, Ireland English

*Dates and venues subject to change

Prices

PADI Five Star Dive Center: £225 / €275

PADI Dive Center: £279 / €350

PADI Course Director: £279 / €350

Individual PADI Member: £425 / €515

Additional Delegate Discount: 50%

Click here to download registration form

To ensure a custom-tailored learning environment, the number of attendees are limited, so don’t delay. If you haven’t attended a Business Academy before, we strongly encourage you to not miss out and sign up today.

Attendance at a PADI Business Academy will result in PADI Member Seminar credit for:

  • PADI Master Instructor applications.
  • PADI Course Director Training Course application.

PADI Business Academy includes:

  • PADI Business Academy polo shirt
  • Lunch and snacks/beverages in breaks
  • USB filled with materials and resources
  • Cocktail reception

*Price does not include airfare, hotel or transportation costs. All other expenses incurred will be the responsibility of the participant. Dates and locations are subject to change, please regularly refer back to this page for updated information.

Contact your PADI Regional Manager or email pba.emea@padi.com for more information.

To register, simply click here to download and complete the form and return it to David Protheroe in the Marketing department.

 

Stopping the Sting

Written by DAN staff

Marine life stings are an uncommon, but unfortunate reality of exploring the underwater world. No matter how hard you try, you can’t entirely eliminate the risk of marine life stings for yourself or your student divers. Know how to reduce risk, treat injuries, and keep your students more sting-free and happily diving this year.

Jellyfish in an aquarium with blue water

Jellyfish

The name “jellyfish” refers to an enormous number of marine animals belonging to the phylum Cnidarian. While some species, like the Box Jellyfish, can cause life-threatening health complications with their venom, the majority of jellyfish encountered by divers are significantly less lethal. Jellyfish stings typically range from painless, imperceptive numbness, to burning reactions with mild to moderate blistering.

Student divers may be too excited and task-focused on their first dives to keep an eye out for jellyfish, so exposure protection is important. Have students use dive skins, wetsuits or dry suits as appropriate to protect their skin. In locations where the jellyfish populations are prominent, it’s possible to be stung by almost invisible strands or tentacle pieces carried in the current. Exposure suits are the best bet for injury prevention in these areas.

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If stung, irrigate the area with generous amounts of vinegar to prevent further envenomation, remove any visible tentacles with tweezers or protective barriers, and wash the area with a seawater or saline solution. Irrigating with freshwater can cause further envenomation. Using painkillers, anti-inflammatory medications, or topical anesthetics can help remedy discomfort, as can immersing the area in hot water or icing the injury for 30 to 90 minutes.

Life threatening reactions are rare, but possible, and are characterized by severe pain, nausea, vomiting, shortness of breath, muscle spasms, low blood pressure, dysrhythmias, and cardiovascular failure. Follow emergency care procedures and quickly get the patient to professional medical care in these cases.

Fire Coral

Fire coral are colonial marine cnidarians that can envenomate humans through direct skin contact and cause burning skin reactions. The coral often appears yellow-green or brownish and frequently has branchy formations, although this can vary based on its environment. Divers can prevent injury by avoiding fire coral contact or by using exposure protection, such as dive skins or gloves.

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Fire coral injuries typically present as a burning sensation that can last several hours, followed by a rash that may last for several days. The rash will often subside after a day or two, only to reappear several days or weeks later. Treat fire coral injuries by rinsing the affected area with vinegar and keeping the area clean, dry, and aerated. Redness and blisters will likely develop. Allow the injury to heal on its own, do not further irrigate the area or puncture the blisters.

Fire coral injuries are rarely serious, but can complicate open wounds and result in tissue death, so be sure to seek qualified medical attention if you or a student has a rash in the area of an open wound.

For more information on marine life injuries, visit DAN.org/Health

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