Training Bulletin Live 4th Quarter 2017

The Fourth Quarter Training Bulletin Live webinars are coming soon. As always, we will be discussing the latest standards changes, providing background information on the updates and insight into how these can be integrated into your training.

Join us live in your chosen language on the dates below. If you miss the live event, registration will ensure that you get a follow up email linking you to the recording.

4th Quarter:

English: 24/10/2017

Italian: 25/10/2017

Spanish: 26/10/2017

Arabic: 30/10/2017

Dutch: 31/10/2017

Portuguese: 02/11/2017

French: 06/11/2017

Polish: 07/11/2017

German: 08/11/2017

Scandinavian/Nordic: 09/11/2017

Russian: 15/11/2017

If you have any questions regarding the webinar you can email training.emea@padi.com. We look forward to speaking to you during the webinar.

Women’s Dive Day Video Contest Winners

PADI® Members in 85 countries hosted a record 884 events in celebration of the third annual PADI Women’s Dive Day on 15 July 2017. Since the inaugural event in 2015, PADI has seen widespread adoption and support of its Women In Diving initiative. This year proved no different as PADI Members from across the world submitted their wonderfully creative Women’s Dive Day videos for the global contest.

All the videos have now been reviewed and 10 stand out videos have been chosen. Winners were selected based on inspiration, quality of footage, originality and/or best overall depiction of the event.

From the EMEA region, the winners are:

diveOceanus Royal Island 

Olgiata Diving 

Sophyline Phay Vals

The winners will receive their 2018 membership renewal fee and 25 sets of Women’s Dive Day giveaways for the 4th Annual PADI Women’s Dive Day is July 21st, 2018!

PADI Women’s Dive Day 2017 garnered more than 90 million media impressions worldwide and reached millions of people via social media, increasing awareness and excitement for diving across a wide audience. Mark your calendars for 2018 and help grow the diving community!

Risk Factors for Heart Disease

Written by DAN staff

Heart health is essential to an active lifestyle that includes scuba diving. Symptoms of heart conditions are often subtle or easily missed, and in some cases, the first indication of a serious cardiac problem may be a heart attack. That’s why it’s imperative for divers to truthfully complete the RSTC Medical Statement and disclose their health histories before starting training. It’s also important for you to know the primary risk factors of heart disease because they apply to dive professionals just as much as student divers.

3D illustration of Heart, medical concept.

Hypertension

Hypertension, or high blood pressure, is a contributing factor in 13 percent of cardiac deaths, and may lead to a thickening and weakening of the tissues in the heart. This change in heart tissue can cause disturbances in heart rhythms, and elevate the risk of stroke, heart attack and kidney failure. While high blood pressure alone may seem relatively benign, it’s important to recognize that it can result in some very serious consequences if left unaddressed.

Smoking

While smoking causes a well-known laundry list of cardiopulmonary issues, it’s also a leading cause of cardiac diseases. Smoking increases the risk of coronary heart disease, peripheral vascular disease, stroke, sudden cardiac death and cancer. It also increases blood pressure and lipid levels and can result in sustained, low-level inflammation that causes the cardiovascular system to deteriorate, and may increase DCS risk.

Hyperlipidemia

Hyperlipidemia or high cholesterol may double a person’s 10-year risk of dying, and increases risk of clotting conditions, high blood pressure and stroke. High cholesterol levels rarely give obvious symptoms until it cause a serious cardiac issue. Lipid levels should be tested regularly by a physician and can be controlled through diet and medication.

Inactivity

Inactive people are twice as likely to develop heart disease as active people. Regular exercise helps to maintain both health and a capacity for sustained exercise. Also, exercise can slow a decline in exercise capacity due to aging and reduce risks of many health-related hazards.

Obesity

Obesity can be a difficult subject to address, but it significantly elevates a person’s risk of cardiac problems, among other hazards. Divers who struggle with obesity may need to exert themselves more while diving, which places additional strain on their heart, and may have difficulty dealing with the physical demands of strenuous dives, putting them at an increased risk of injury.

For more information on cardiac risks and diving, visit DAN.org/Health

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A PADI Divemaster Certification is just the Beginning

Working in a PADI Dive Center, Rescue Diver Lucy Crow not only gained her PADI Divemaster qualification but so much more.

“I started working with Ocean Turtle Diving doing some work experience. I had wanted to to do my PADI Divemaster for a while and decided that it was a great opportunity to start it with them. I must say that it was one of the best experiences of my diving life.

I am not a big reader most days, however, I started reading the Divemaster Manual and found it so interesting. If there were bits that I didn’t understand or had questions on, I knew that I would have the team’s full support to help me out.

It came to the theory exam day and because of my PADI Instructor’s support I felt confident about what I had learnt. I went in with a smile. We sat down as a group and went through the manual. There were three students there and we were all as happy as each other. We then completed the exam and all came out smiling. I could now focus on getting through the pool sessions and becoming fit enough to meet these performance requirements.

By January I had not only completed my PADI Divemaster course but also all of the training in the dive centre itself. I really enjoyed learning the ins and outs of how the dive centre ran and meeting new and exciting customers almost every day. There was always something new to learn.  I asked if I could continue to work there and was given an amazing opportunity for a Saturday job. Over six months later I am still working at the dive centre and love it.

Being a PADI Divemaster is not only about having professional level knowledge but also about being aware that people learning to dive may be nervous or scared. The best thing about working in the dive centre has been the staff and the customers combined. It is like my second family here. They have built up not only my knowledge of diving but my confidence overall.”

PADI announces its 2018 Shows!

PADI has been busy planning its 2018 events schedule and is excited to announce that it will be exhibiting at the following shows:

Salon de la Plongée (Paris, France): 12 – 15 January.
Boot (Dusseldorf, Germany): 20 – 28 January – PADI Village.
Salón de la Inmersión (Barcelona, Spain): 23 – 25 February – PADI Village.
DMEX (Dubai, UAE): 27 February – 3 March.
EUDI (Bologna, Italy): 2 – 4 March – PADI Village.

PADI will also have a presence at these shows:

Moscow Dive Show (Moscow, Russia): 1 – 4 February.
Duikvaker (Houten, Netherlands): 3 – 4 February.
Podwodna Przygoda (Warsaw, Poland): 3 – 4 March.
DykMassan (Stockholm, Sweden): 17 – 18 March.

Additional 2018 shows will be added as they are confirmed. Check in regularly for an updated list.

We hope you’ll join us at one or more of the shows. If you’d like to partner with us in one of the PADI villages please contact your Regional Manager for more information.

Prodivers Cleaned Up the World…

Sunday 17th September 2017 saw millions of people around the world join together for the annual Clean up the World event. Guest and team members of Prodivers on Kuredu and Komandoo joined them.

 

A team of more than 113 guests and staff took part in the event and collected rubbish from the islands, the ocean and the reefs.

A staggering 75 bags were collected as well as lots of pieces of wood and metal. The volunteers were organised into groups and were each given an area to clean.

After the clean-up came the celebration – participants enjoyed a cocktail party held in their honor and were each given a thank you gift of an event t-shirt.

A big thank you to the guests, Resort staff and Prodivers team members who gave up their time for such a good cause – what an amazing team effort.

 

The Magic of Multiple-Level Dive Training

Written by John Kinsella

PADI dive training

It’s not too often you come across something that gets absolutely no hits on Google. Multiple-Level Training is one of those things. Where you will find it is under Organization in the Teaching Techniques section of PADI’s Guide to Teaching. If it’s been a while since you checked it out, take a moment to read it again, especially if you want to boost your Divemaster and IDC enrollment.

The basic idea is to have several different levels of training happening at the same time and at the same place. Done right, multiple-level training is not only an efficient use of resources; it’s a powerful way to motivate existing divers to consider going pro.

The key is planning and careful scheduling (there’s a great sample schedule in the Guide to Teaching) and to build in time for divers to mingle and socialize. It also helps to have a few certified assistants. Consider these strategies to maximize the cross promotional benefits of multiple-level training:

Have all divers together for the area orientation. Let everyone know what’s going on and take some time to introduce the divers to each other: “Welcome to the dive site, we have three activities going on this morning, the Divemaster Mapping exercise, the Advanced Open Water Diver Navigation Dive, and Open Water Dive One.” Cover the usual points, make sure to mention who is doing what (by name), then split up into individual course groups to finish the briefings.

Keep people moving and don’t waste their time. In this example, you could overview the Divemaster Mapping exercise seamlessly with the area orientation before breaking up the groups. This has the benefit of clearly highlighting an interesting part of Divemaster training to both the AOW and OW divers. Then have a certified assistant keep an eye on the Open Water Divers while they assemble their gear and get ready for your predive brief. Meanwhile you’re running through the (detailed) brief for the AOW Navigation dive and setting the divers up to practice their navigation patterns on land. (Which will certainly get the Open Water Divers attention.)

Make good use of your own time. Once you’ve covered the AOW brief, have those divers assemble and set up their gear and present themselves for the dive at a specific time. Head over to the entry point where the OW Divers are ready to go and your certified assistants have the shot line already positioned. Enter, run the dive and when you exit you find the AOW divers ready to go. You supervise that dive from the surface and while the AOW divers are breaking down their gear post dive, you debrief the OW divers before you debrief them.

By now the Divemaster candidates are wrapping up their mapping exercise and you check with them before everyone settles down to enjoy lunch.

All you have to do now is sit back and let the buzz do your marketing work for you.

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Put the Master Scuba Diver Program to Work

The PADI Master Scuba Diver™ rating is often described as “the black belt of scuba.” While most people know what a karate black belt is, entry-level divers may not understand the prestige of the Master Scuba Diver rating. You need to inspire all your customers to join the elite group of divers who reach this level.SI_MSD_OWOLJan07-0701

Why? Because it’s not only the ultimate rating that signifies an accomplished and experienced diver, but also because you gain a customer who takes eight courses, commits to more than 50 dives, and will likely purchased a full set of gear. There are at least three reasons why you should implement or bolster your Master Scuba Diver program today:

  1. Offer and fill more courses. The Master Scuba Diver program sets goals for your customers and they enroll in the courses needed to reach their goals.
  2. Support active divers. The more training your divers receive, the more dives they make, the more gear they purchase, and then they dive even more.
  3. Create loyal customers. Your diver retention rates will increase as your divers become more competent and comfortable in the water.

Here are a just few ideas for raising awareness and interest in your Master Scuba Diver program:

  • Create a wall of fame in your store to recognize customers who have achieved the prestigious Master Scuba Diver rating.
  • Publicly chart the progress of current Advanced Open Water and Rescue Divers to encourage friendly competition among students.
  • Invite Master Scuba Divers to be guest speakers at your next course orientation.
  • Give special recognition to your Master Scuba Divers at a dive club meeting or store BBQ.
  • Develop a five specialty program for your area that showcase local diving, or perhaps focuses on the environment – Cold Water Master Scuba Diver or Eco-Master Scuba Diver.
  • Offer an exclusive dive trip only for Master Scuba Divers.

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PADI Freediver Training at Sinai Blues – Sharm El Sheikh

During the first week of September, PADI 5* Dive Resort –  Sinai Blues in Sharm El Sheikh has organized a PADI Freediver training for some of its staff.

With the aim to be able to offer – in the near future – PADI Freeidiving courses to their customers, Sinai Blues management has decided to team up not with an ‘ordinary’ instructor trainer but with the PADI Freediver Instructor Trainer Andrea Zuccari: the Italian multiple Freediving Record Holder who has recently set the NO Limits Italian Record at -185 mt !!

Back to the training….

Considering that, to become a PADI Freediver Instructor, a PADI Open Water Scuba Instructor needs to become PADI Freediver and PADI Advanced Freediver (or hold a
qualifying certification from another organization), Andrea suggested the team to focus on the PADI Freediver Course first, gain some experience …and later on this year, progress to the PADI Advanced Freediver.

When PADI Regional Manager – Teo Brambilla was informed about ‘the plans’ he decided to jump at the chance and attend the course himself.

Here below, Teo’s quick summary of his experience.

The course was spread over three days:

The theory part was easily handled with the great support of the PADI Freediver Touch …and an enjoyable and thorough review by Andrea.

First day we practiced relaxation/breathing techniques followed by a static apnea session in the swimming pool.

Second day we first did an Open Water Session focusing on Free Immersion, followed by a swimming pool session working on duck diving , dynamic apnea  and rescue skills.

Third Day we enjoyed Constant weight Freediving and Rescue skills in Open water!

At the end of the course, we were not only able to comfortably meet the performance requirements and perform:

  • one static apnea attempt of at least 90 seconds.
  • one dynamic apnea of at least 25 metres.
  • one constant weight freedive to at least 10 metres.

But most importantly: we now know how to correctly use buddy procedures to supervise a Freediver before, during and after a dive and/or an attempt.

Teo commented: “I enjoyed every single moment of the course! It was amazing to see how a proper breathing technique can help you relaxing and achieve goals I have always seen as unreachable …I will apply it not only to freediving but also to many other life situations. It was also great to be able to benefit of such an athlete’s knowledge and skills: Andrea is a really humble and easy going person, always ready to answer any question I/we had. I am practicing during my free time …and I am really looking forward to completing the PADI Advanced Freediver in November!”

If you are a PADI Instructor or a PADI Diving Center owner/manager based in Egypt and you wish to offer PADI Freediving courses to your customers, get in contact with PADI Regional Manager – Teo.Brambilla@padi.com: he may have some tips for you!

Sun screen: A new threat to a vulnerable reef

Is it our health for theirs? Gili Lankanfushi begins an eco-sunscreen revolution.

Sun screen is a holiday essential – from children covered in a thick layer, to the bald spot on Dad’s head. We think sun screens are safe, but is this the reality? A key ingredient in more than 3,500 sun protection products is oxybenzone. This chemical is absorbed into our bloodstream, can cause allergic reactions and very worryingly was last tested as far back as the 1970’s. It is also possible that oxybenzone may act similarly to a related chemical, benzophenone which attacks DNA when illuminated, and can lead to cancer. Studies are currently being carried out. Annually four to six thousand tonnes of these chemicals enter our ocean through wastewater effluent, and by swimmers slathered up with sunscreen. Acting like an oil slick, the chemicals settle on marine life and the reefs become suffocated.

Reef safe sun screen with no oxybenzone

Corals are animals called polyps that share their home with algae called zooxanthellae. They work together in a symbiotic relationship which means both parties benefit. The coral animal produces a skeleton to shelter the algae whilst building the reef and the algae through photosynthesis provide the coral animal with 95% of its food. In the Maldives, the reefs are under severe external pressure. Sun screen is an added significant hazard which threatens the resiliency of the coral to climate change.

Healthy coral with blue-green chromis population

Bleaching is the term used when coral loses its symbiotic algae; this can happen for a variety of reasons. A study by R. Danovaro and a team of scientists showed that oxybenzone promotes latent viral growth in the symbiotic algae. In the study, fragments of coral were taken throughout the tropics and incubated with seawater containing small quantities of sunscreen (10 microlitres). Bleaching occurred within four days, whereas in the control group which had no sunscreen there was no bleaching. Water samples taken 18 – 48 hours after sunscreen exposure showed that the symbiotic algae, instead of being a healthy brown colour were pale/transparent and full of holes. Additionally viral particles were abundant; 15 times more viral particles where found in water samples exposed to sunscreen than in the control group. This suggests that the coral animal or algae contain a latent virus activated by chemicals in sunscreen. This latent infection is found globally. Oxybenzone is a photo-toxicant, which means that its negative effects are accelerated by light – something which the Maldives does not lack. In other studies, oxybenzone has been found to alter the larval stage of the coral from a healthy swimming state to a deformed motionless condition. It has also been found to cause DNA lesions and endocrine disruption, resulting in coral larvae encasing themselves in their skeletons and dying. The severity of this is proportional to chemical concentration.

Bleaching experiment by R. Danovaro and his team. They tested the effects of 100-μL sunscreens on Acropora divaricata nubbins after 24-hr incubation at various temperatures. (A) control; (B) nubbins incubated at 28°C; and (C) nubbins incubated (photo credit to R. Danovaro and his team)

In some parts of the world oxybenzone found on the surface has reached concentrations that indicate the potential for bioaccumulation of this chemical within reef organisms. Since oxybenzone mimics oestrogen it is causing male fish to change into females. This has been particularly noticed in turbot and sole feeding near sewage outlets. Since a healthy fish population is vital for reef survival this feminisation of fish will have a devastating long term impact.

As the effects of sunscreen are becoming more apparent positive action is being taken. In Mexico, several marine reserves have banned the use of none marine safe sun protection products after high mortality was noted in reef organisms and currently Hawaii is trying to ban the sale of harmful sunscreen. In addition, the development of eco-friendly sunscreens is now booming.

We at Gili Lankanfushi want to become part of this movement and understand that we need to protect our delicate marine environment, which is why the boutique is now selling a range of marine safe products, so next time you are here please help us protect our reef!

Reef safe sun screen with no oxybenzone

Please refer to this link for reef safe sunscreen: http://scubadiverlife.com/top-four-reef-safe-sunscreens/

PADI’s guest blogger Emma Bell introduces herself:

I am a marine biologist and scuba diver from England. I have had the privilege of working in Greece, Seychelles and Maldives. I have worked in an aquaculture research centre where I focused on hormonal manipulation of a pelagic fish species. In addition, I have experience with coral restoration projects including frames and ropes; habitat restoration – crown of thorns, drupella and invasive plant species removal; educational activities and social media updates including blogs. I have also monitored population dynamics of bird, turtle, shark and cetacean species to aid in their conservation. I started my career working in the Maldives and I have done a round trip via Greece, England and Seychelles, I hope to increase my skills set and knowledge further whilst I am at Gili Lankanfushi, Maldives.