PADI EMEA: English Speaking Contacts

 Meet our English speaking staff

If you have any questions, please feel free to contact our team



Matt Clements

Regional Manager – UK North

Tel:  +44 7583 240512

Email: matt.clements@padi.com

Languages: EN


 

Emma Hewitt                                

Regional Manager – UK South, Ireland and Wales

Tel: +44 7583 099522 

Email: emma.hewitt@padi.com

Languages: EN

 


Emily Petley-Jones

Regional Training Consultant – UK North

Tel:  +44 117 300 7381

Email: emily.petley-jones@padi.com

Languages: EN

 


Su-Li Wong

Regional Training Consultant – UK South, Ireland and Wales

Tel:  +44 117 300 7874

Email: su-li.wong@padi.com

Languages: EN


Chris Ball

Regional Sales Consultant (Greece & Croatia)

Tel:  +44 117 300 7340

Email: chris.ball@padi.com

Languages: EN


Corrina Hawker

Regional Customer Relations Consultant

Tel:  +44 117 300 7307

Email: corrina.hawker@padi.com

Languages: EN

 


 

Lynn Jones

Regional Customer Relations Consultant

Tel:  +44 117 300 7323

Email: lynn.jones@padi.com

Languages: EN


Premium Listing on the PADI Dive Shop Locator

Did you know that padi.com receives more than 1.75 million monthly page views and nearly 422,000 unique monthly visitors? Not to mention, the PADI Dive Shop Locator is accessed over 26,500 times a month. That’s a lot of divers! PADI is now offering the PADI Premium Listing, a powerful tool you can use to take advantage of this online traffic and promote your dive center or resort within the Dive Shop Locator. Read below to find out all the ways the PADI Premium Listing can benefit you.

PREMIUM DIVE SHOP LOCATOR LISTING INCLUDES:

  • Name, address, phone number and an interactive map to easily locate you.
  • Image displays directly on the main listing to make your facility stand out!
  • Expanded business content to further advertise your operation.
  • Information organized under easy-to-navigate tabs.
  • Information displayed on the PADI Mobile app.

Expanded Information with the PADI Premium Listing

PremiumListingPremium Listing – Expanded Information Card

InformationCardPADI Sponsored Side Bar Ads

BarAdsUpgrade now to the premium listing for only US $160 per year.

If you have questions, please contact Annette Ridout.

PADI Divemaster Teaching Opportunities Expanded

As an Active status PADI Divemaster, you will be able to find work all over the world in an endless supply of exciting locations. World-class house reefs become your office and not just another desktop screen saver. The world is your oyster! Where will your adventure as a PADI Divemaster take you?

What you can do as an authorised PADI Divemaster:

  • Supervise training and non-training related diving activities
  • Conduct dive briefings, scuba reviews, PADI ReActivate and skin diver course
  • Assist in Discover Scuba Diving programs and lead additional dives
  • Lead Discover Local Diving programs
  • Teach these specialty courses without dives:
    • Equipment Specialist
    • Coral Reef Conservation
    • Project AWARE Specialist
    • PADI Distinctive Specialty Diver courses that don’t include dives
    • Digital Underwater Photographer
    • Emergency Oxygen Provider

Take a look at the Third Quarter 2017 Training Bulletin to find out how to qualify to teach these specialty courses. Stand out from the crowd and expand your PADI Divemaster teaching opportunities…who knows where your next PADI Pro Adventure will take you!

 

 

Living the Divemaster Life – Birgitta Mueck

Born and raised on the island of Orust, on the west coast of Sweden, Birgitta Mueck’s love and curiosity for the wilderness led her to become an underwater camera operator, guide, PADI Divemaster and PADI AmbassaDiver. 

Picture Credit: Nanna Mueck

We caught up with Birgitta to find out more about her adventures as a                   PADI Divemaster !  


When did you know that you wanted to become a PADI Divemaster?

The idea of becoming a PADI Divemaster is something that slowly and steadily grew with me. Whilst working as an underwater camera operator, we produced films to help promote interest and understanding for life hidden beneath the waves. Becoming a PADI Divemaster felt like a great opportunity to be able to share these wonderful experiences as-well as my love and admiration for the ocean with others. Not much beats the feeling of sharing amazing experiences – it inspires, spreads smiles, creates friendships and gives unforgettable moments.

When and where did you become a PADI Divemaster?

I signed up for my PADI Divemaster course at Blue Adventures Diving in Crete, Greece during the summer of 2012. Completing the PADI Divemaster course and working with Blue Adventures Diving was both very inspiring and lots of fun, a summer I look back on with a big smile!

Describe a typical day in your working life as a PADI Divemaster?

No day is the same, you meet so many wonderful people and experience something new every day. Regardless if working at dive centers or on live-a-boards, the days differ a lot depending on the setup, where you are and the local conditions which may vary daily. As I alternate between warm waters and freezing cold latitudes, such as Antarctica and the Arctic, my daily activities differ a lot. Having variety is also why I enjoy working as a PADI Divemaster so much!

Picture Credit: Antonis Markakos                                                                                                                    Great memories from Crete where Birgitta spent 6 wonderful months as a PADI Divemaster back in 2012

What have been your most memorable moments working as a PADI Divemaster?

That is a hard one as being a PADI Divemaster offers countless memorable moments. Dancing sea lions showing off in Antarctica, intimate curious Orca encounters in Northern Norway, beautiful and exciting cavern dives in the Mediterranean Sea to name a few… When working as a PADI Divemaster, the most important thing for me is that all guests have fun. Seeing their big smiles and their eagerness for more adventure, are my most memorable moments as a PADI Divemaster.

In 3 words, can you describe your experience being a Divemaster so far?

Fun, Social, Outdoors!

Picture Credit: Edik Skarina                                                                                                                           “Through my work I want to share my immense passion for the wonderful planet we are living on, to inspirit life, raise awareness and inspire others” Birgitta says.

What are your diving plans for the future?

I just returned to Sweden from a 6 month long sail and film expedition in Northern Norway, where we spent most of the winter filming for our ongoing film production which is a collaboration with Swedish National Television. For now, my next diving plans involve more diving and filming around the Swedish west coast and Norway. Due to my many different assignments and my own adventure projects, my life differs a lot each year. When possible, I like to keep myself flexible without planning ahead too much so I have more freedom to take up new opportunities as and when they arise.

I am  excited about many more upcoming adventures and am very much looking forward to continuing sharing my passion for wildlife and the underwater world, and spreading even more smiles as a PADI Divemaster!

Women’s Health in Diving

Written by DAN staff

DFD_WomenDiversWith PADI® Women’s Dive Day coming up on 15 July, this is an excellent time to review a few issues unique to female scuba divers. The issues that pertain to women’s health and safety in the water aren’t broadly publicized. Refresh yourself on some of the most common gender-specific questions student divers may ask and do your part to better educate the dive community.

Oral Contraceptives

While there has been no evidence found that the use of oral contraceptives increases a diver’s risk of DCS, it may slightly elevate the risk of clotting conditions like deep vein thrombosis (DVT). Research indicates that use of an oral contraceptive pill (OCP) can increase the risk of events like a pulmonary embolism, heart attack or stroke. That risk is further increased by a sedentary lifestyle and smoking. While these events may be somewhat manageable on dry land, they can cause serious issues in the water. OCP use is generally accepted as safe for divers, but it’s recommend that student divers exercise regularly and not smoke to reduce their risk of clotting conditions that could cause injuries during a dive.

Diving After Pregnancy

Recommendations for returning to diving after childbirth vary based on the type of delivery. After a typical delivery without complications, a woman can generally resume diving in about 21 days. This allows time for the cervix to close and limits the risk of infection. Uncomplicated Cesarean sections generally require eight to 12 weeks of recovery before diving to limit infection risk. If a woman is put on bed rest due to complications of the pregnancy, it is prudent to refrain from diving for more than 12 weeks because of the loss of strength and aerobic capacity. Following a miscarriage, a woman can return to diving as soon as a physician releases her for full and unrestricted activity.

Couple on an adventure

Osteoporosis

The National Osteoporosis Foundation recommends that women receive a bone density test if they have broken a bone after age 50, are menopausal or postmenopausal with risk factors, or are older than age 65. The recommendations include a significant portion of both divers and potential divers, and the condition should not be overlooked. Osteoporosis is not a contraindication for diving, but women who have the condition or severe bone loss should consider donning equipment in the water and adapting their diving to reduce the risk of fractures and falls. Good precautions for divers who may have compromised bone health include avoiding wearing heavy dive gear out of the water, carrying cylinders on land, or undertaking hazardous shore entries.

Breast Implants

Once sufficient time has passed after a breast augmentation or reconstructive surgery, a diver may resume diving without increased risk. Divers with implants may experience minor buoyancy and trim changes following their surgery, and should avoid constrictive chest straps that may increase the likelihood of implant rupture, but otherwise have no reason to be concerned. Breast implants do not pose a problem to diving from the standpoint of gas absorption and do not represent a contraindication to diving.

For more information on women’s health and diving visit DAN.org/Health

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Pro-Level Continuing Education

Written by John Kinsella

It’s at the very heart of the PADI® System and instinctively you know it’s important. You make a point of letting all the divers you work with know about continuing education: Open Water Diver is just the beginning, Advanced Open Water Diver is not for advanced divers, it’s to advance divers, Rescue Diver is the obvious next step and so on. Promoting diver level continuing education is second nature for dive pros. But do you practice what you preach? Professional-level continuing education is, if anything, even more important. Here are a few reasons why:

  1. Continuing education benefits both dive businesses and dive pros. Businesses thrive on highly skilled, specialized and cross functional staff who have the skills to perform a variety of duties and teach a broad range of courses. Dive pros with those skills position themselves well for promotions and equip themselves to compete effectively in the job market. Simply put, they’ll get better jobs and their employer will have a more valuable employees.PADIDiveShop_0513_0204
  2. Perhaps an even greater benefit for dive professionals is that continuing education encourages finding and using the best tools and techniques available at any given time, and to realize that these tools and techniques will change over time. This attitude is increasingly important in the face of consistent technological advances and increased competition for jobs. Crucially, it helps dive businesses stay relevant to emerging markets that expect, and demand, technologically savvy instructors.
  3. Another continuing education benefit may be more abstract, but is no less important: It’s a powerful way for dive pros to acquire both theoretical and practical knowledge and to improve their problem-solving skills. This is an essential arrow in every dive professional’s quiver. Things change, issues crop up, but the well educated and well prepared PADI Pro is equipped to avoid or solve problems before they become something worse.
  4. Finally, it’s just fun. There is no better cure for a mild dose of the “same old same old” than an immersive experience in something new and exciting. Nothing benefits a dive business more than a refreshed dive pro.

 

The Business of Women in Diving

Written by Megan Denny

The average entry-level diver is 27-30 years old, college educated, and male (60 percent are male). For many years the gender ratio of 65 percent male versus 35 percent female remained constant. However, there’s been a shift in the past five years and women now make up 40 percent of new divers. That’s good progress, but the pool of potential women divers is still massive.

An average female consumer is an ideal scuba diving customer. The numbers don’t lie.

Major companies, such as Nike and the PGA (Professional Golfers Association) are taking statistics like these to heart. After Nike chose to focus on women, sales jumped 20 percent and Nike expects revenue from women’s apparel more than double in five years. The PGA recently launched a campaign to increase women’s participation in golf – an industry that is in decline. Only 19 percent of all golfers are women, and PGA research shows, “there are millions of women who want to participate in golf, but they don’t feel welcome. They haven’t been invited.”

Make Women Feel Welcome

Many of the things that make your business female-friendly are just plain smart business practices including:

  • Offer PADI eLearning® – Working women and those trying to balance family commitments will appreciate this flexible, go-at-your-own-pace option.
  • Keep it clean – Many people, not just women, think negatively about a business with a dingy bathroom or changing room. If you’d think twice about showing your mother your facilities, it’s time to spruce up the place.
  • Invite them back – Get in touch with women who’ve dropped out of scuba diving and invite them back by promoting ReActivate®.
  • Stock women’s gear – Having dive gear and other products designed for women available is welcoming.

LadyGearPool_0716_01sml

One of the most effective ways to bring in new female divers is by asking current customers to invite other women to try diving. Be upfront: let them know you’re trying to change the perception that scuba is for old guys. Ask what you could do to bring in more women and offer an incentive. The results will pay off.

“Camaraderie keeps women diving, buying gear, taking trips,” says Chelsea Cameron, Sales and Marketing Manager for The Diving Locker in Vancouver, Canada. “There’s one group of ladies at our store that went to Cozumel together and they‘re like the three amigas. They’ve been doing courses together, they all bought dry suits together and they egg each other on.”

Female Staff and Instructors are Essential

“Having female staff helps to draw in more female divers. They feel more comfortable when they see other women in the sport. Especially when fitting gear, there are things guys don’t think of, especially with getting into wetsuits,” says Cameron.

Virginia Watson, Marketing Manager at Dive Otago, New Zealand echoes this sentiment. Having a mix of male and female instructors enables us to provide good role models for female divers that are just beginning in their dive career. They see that even in our harsher conditions, women are more than capable of diving day in day out.”

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Women make up at least half the staff at both Dive Otago and The Diving Locker and research proves this is a smart idea for any business.

  • An economist from Carnegie Mellon found teams with at least one female member had a collectively higher IQ than male-only teams.
  • When Fortune 500 companies had at least three female directors, the return on capital, sales and return on equity increased by 40 percent or more.
  • Studies from a variety of industries found that having a larger number of women on a team accounts for greater psychological safety, team confidence, group experimentation and team efficiency.

Source themuse.com

Greg Kocher owner and president of The Diving Locker notes, “I’ve been in business for 50 years and I’ve always tried to promote scuba to different age groups and demographics. I have eight full time employees and half of them are women. It’s proven to be a good model. I’ve been in business so long because of the exceptional staff.”

At Broadreach, a youth educational adventure company, 75 percent of headquarters employees are women and 62 percent of their dive staff are female. “Having so many women in leadership and instructor roles makes us a very adaptable company, as we’re all coming to the table with different points of view. It makes us better problem solvers and communicators, plus it gives us stronger collaborative spirit,” says Creative Director Ladye Jane Vickers.

Kate Farthing, Director of Field Operations at Broadreach adds, “Our programs have attracted more female students each year, and having females working in the industry is often encouraging to parents trying to support their young women as they reach for their goals. The ability to understand, support and encourage our female students is really rewarding and I think sits well with our clients.

“Female dive staff, for lack of a better way to put this, can help ease the concerns of female participants in ways that male instructors have a harder time with. Getting in and out of wetsuits, lugging gear around, what do I do if I’m on my period…all of these things are so naturally facilitated by female dive instructors (not to say that guys aren’t able) but it’s important to have both so all students feel comfortable sharing their concerns and finding solutions.”

Marketing to Women

Virginia Watson from Dive Otago shared this tip: “Championing female divers on Facebook is an awesome way to boost enrollment numbers organically. When we are actively looking to increase female numbers through paid advertising we specifically target that demographic and use images of inspiring female divers. People need to identify themselves in the imagery so including photos of woman in all areas of your marketing should also help… it might inadvertently pull in more males too!”
Check out: 7 Women in Diving Everyone Should Know or female PADI AmbassaDiver™

Photo courtesy of Dive-Otago-2

Photo courtesy of Dive Otago

The Family Factor

Roughly half of women of childbearing age are mothers, and some PADI® Dive Centers have found success partnering with a child-care service or hiring a babysitter. This helps mom take a breather (off a regulator) while she does a scuba review, and gives parents a chance to enjoy time together as a couple.

Another popular way to attract mothers and families is by offering kids scuba programs and selling products that cater to divers with children. “We run a week-long scuba camp for kids 10-15 years old four times during the summer. Predominantly, three women teach the camp, and they enjoy doing it. But all of our staff are involved in teaching, selling, and running weekend trips,” says Kocher of The Dive Locker.

Broadreach Dive Instructor Hannah Tannenbaum shared her thoughts on the benefits of scuba for girls and young women, “Diving is empowering because it’s an entirely new realm in which social pressures and appearance don’t matter. All that matters is your safety, awareness, and immense humility in acknowledging we are such a small piece of this wide and beautiful world, and that our stresses and day-to-day problems don’t matter as much in the face of a sea turtle. I love teaching young women to dive and seeing them develop a new sense of self and gratitude for their world which diving opens.”

Build a Community

A study from Indiana University on exercise habits found that people with a regular gym buddy experienced only a 6.3 percent dropout rate after twelve months compared to a 43 percent dropout rate for people who worked out alone. Help female divers stay active by starting a “Diva Dive Club,” or a PADI Pro mentorship program.

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Kate Farthing from Broadreach notes, “The mere presence of our female staff offers such a great vision of the future to our students. They know being a dive professional isn’t such a far off goal.  Many of our dive instructors began as Broadreach students in middle school and worked their way to being instructors by the age of 18. Our students really build lore around the instructors who have been around Broadreach since they started diving and think they are the coolest of the cool. It’s an easy thing to aspire to.”

Nondiving events (beach parties, bar nights, clean-up events, etc.) can help divers – male or female – connect with new dive buddies. Encourage customers to invite female friends who are curious about diving, but aren’t ready to sign up for a class. Scuba diving can seem intimidating, but meeting fun and supportive divers can quickly shatter that perception.

If you’re interested in bringing more women into diving, use PADI Women’s Dive Day on 15 July as a kickoff event. Dive Otago plans to offer free Discover Scuba® Diving sessions, high tea and tutus. Broadreach has numerous Women’s Dive Day activities planned including a thank you celebration for their female staff and live-streamed dives.

Get started at the PADI Pros’ Site Women in Diving page

DFD_WDD

Trying something new can be intimidating – for potential female divers and business owners. But when more women dive, it’s a win-win. Here are some parting words from Chelsea Cameron at The Dive Locker, When you’re out on a dive with more female divers it’s more low pressure, people are more comfortable sharing stories. Having more women is great for the shop the atmosphere. We enjoy it a lot, we have fun, we keep the guys in check.”

3Q17 Training Bulletin Live

The Third Quarter Training Bulletin Live webinars are coming soon. As always, we will be discussing the latest standards changes, providing background information on the updates and insight into how these can be integrated into your training.

Join us live in your chosen language on the dates below. If you miss the live event, registration will ensure that you get a follow up email linking you to the recording.

3rd Quarter:

English: 26/07/2017

Spanish: 27/07/2017

Italian: 28/07/2017

Arabic: 31/07/2017

French: 01/08/2017

German: 02/08/2017

Portuguese: 03/08/2017

Russian: 03/08/2017

Dutch: 07/08/2017

Polish: 08/08/2017

Scandinavian/Nordic: 10/08/2017

If you have any questions regarding the webinar you can email training.emea@padi.com. We look forward to speaking to you during the webinar.

Open Position at PADI EMEA – Marketing Consultant Diver Acquisition

An exciting job opportunity has opened up at the PADI EMEA Regional Headquarter. The Marketing Consultant – Diver Acquisition, is responsible for the execution of EMEA and WW new diver acquisition campaigns. They must be able to take the lead on campaign planning, execution and results evaluation.  Skill set includes online and hard copy advertising across all platforms as well as face to face and online presentations within B2C marketplaces.

Supports the four corporate primary objectives: safe and responsible diver acquisition and retention; Member acquisition and retention; financial prosperity; global operational alignment.

WORK BASED COMPETENCIES

  • Professional marketing and business skills (Essential)
  • Extremely analytical and be able to translate complex data into actionable and profitable marketing plans (Essential)
  • Knowledge of the PADI system, products and market (Essential)
  • Understands and can deliver exceptional customer service (Essential)
  • Business report writing and presentation skills (Essential)
  • Excellent interpersonal and communication skills (both written and oral) with the ability to communicate at all levels (Essential)
  • Problem solving skills (Essential)
  • Excellent IT skills including Microsoft Office (Word, Excel & PowerPoint)
  • Excellent arithmetic and spelling skills
  • Working knowledge of basic copyright and privacy laws.
  • A passion and strong understanding of the industry and our business’ mission.
  • Exceptional writing and editing skills, as well as the ability to adopt the style, tone, and voice of our business’ various types of content. (Essential)
  • Excellent organizational skills to work independently and manage projects with many moving parts.
  • Excellent communicator and creative thinker, with an ability to use both data and intuition to inform decisions.

QUALIFICATIONS, EDUCATION and/or EXPERIENCE

  • Degree level qualification or equivalent in Marketing or Communications (Highly Desirable)
  • Strong experience in a B2C marketing role (Essential)
  • Experience handling marketing budgets and forecasting/reporting results (Desirable)
  • PADI Instructor or above (Desirable)
  • Experience of working internationally (Desirable)
  • Fluent English (Essential)

Please see this job specification for more information. To apply, please send your CV to: melanie.green@padi.com

 

2017 PADI Women’s Dive Day Global Video Contest

Share a video of your PADI Women’s Dive Day event with us and be entered to win a FREE 2018 PADI Membership Renewal.

The PADI Marketing Team is looking for amazing video footage showcasing the spirit of Women’s Dive Day for inclusion in the 2018 event promotional video.

The contest is open to PADI Dive Centers, Resorts and Individual Members worldwide who are hosting a 2017 PADI Women’s Dive Day event.

How to Enter

  1. First things first! If you haven’t already, be sure to register your PADI Women’s Dive Day event. Learn more here.
  2. Grab your underwater camera and take video throughout your event. Whether your event is training in the pool, diving a lake or exploring the open ocean, show how you and your divers are celebrating the spirit and comradery of Women’s Dive Day. A few things to keep in mind:
    • While the primary objective is to promote women in diving, the footage can certainly show all participants regardless of age or gender. After all, the foundation of Women’s Dive Day is to reinforce the understanding that diving is open and enjoyable to everyone.
    • PADI standards should be adhered to and reflected in the footage.
    • Footage that shows any touching or damaging of marine life will not be considered.
    • Be sure to get signed releases from people that are shown in your video footage and photos. Download a sample release here.
  3. Edit your video so that it is between two and five minutes in length. Video should be a minimum 1080p.
  4. Submit your entry to jennifer.small@padi.com, including entrant’s name, PADI Member/Store Number and contact information. Videos must be sent using a file sharing service such as We Transfer or Dropbox. High resolution photos (minimum 1000 pixels) and/or event description and quotes are welcomed, but a video must be submitted to be considered for the prize.
  5. Check your email to see if your video was selected as one of the winners. If so, you will receive one-year 2018 Membership Renewal free and a set of goodie bags for your 2018 Women’s Dive Day event.

Click here to see Official Rules

For inspiration, watch the 2017 PADI Women’s Dive Day video:

Thank you for taking part in PADI Women’s Dive Day 2017 and the Global Video Contest! For more information about PADI Women’s Dive Day, visit padi.com/women-dive.