How to Get the Divemaster Job of Your Dreams (Part 2)

Putting yourself in the Winning Seat

Your PADI Divemaster certification can open the door to a fun and rewarding career anywhere in the world, but landing a great job takes work. Last month, in Part 1, we highlighted different skills you can add to your CV to help you stand out from the crowd and put you in the winning seat.  Below are some more strategies to help you outmaneuver the competition and snatch up your dream job.

How Will You Bring in New Customers?
New customers are the key to the success for any business, and dive operations are no exception. If you have personal connections or new ideas to help the dive shop owner bring more people through their doors, you’ll have a leg up on other job applicants. Here are a few ideas to consider:

– Build relationships with the concierge at local hotels
– Suggest ways to bring lapsed divers back into the shop with PADI ReActivate™
(a program DMs can conduct)
– Pitch a kids scuba summer camp program

– Do outreach to local businesses who might want EFR training
(you can even become an EFR Instructor)

Take Advantage of Online Tools

Visit the employment board on the PADI Pros Site to learn what skills employers are looking for and how you stack up to other PADI Divemasters looking for work.

Promote your skills and passion for diving on Facebook, LinkedIn and other social media channels. Take time to learn how using social media can boost your scuba career.

Every Day is a Job Interview
The dive industry is small, and developing a bad reputation can quickly bring your scuba career to a halt. The diver next to you could be friends with a shop owner, and the server at a restaurant might work part-time on a dive boat. Always present yourself as a professional, trustworthy person online and in real life.

Your appearance can be an important factor in getting hired. Imagine two job applicants with equal qualifications: one who looks like they just washed up on shore and another who has clearly put time and effort into maintaining their hair and clothes – who do you think gets the job?

It’s also important to maintain physical fitness. A dive operation entrusts Divemasters with the safety of their customers. Do you have the strength to help someone back onto a boat? Could you egress someone during a shore dive?

Once you land that Divemaster dream job, act professionally and follow through on what you agreed to during your interview. If the job doesn’t work out, give as much notice as possible.

We hope the tips above help you take advantage of new opportunities in the New Year! For a list of dive operators looking to hire PADI Divemasters, visit the PADI Pros’ Site and choose Employment/Classifieds from the Online Services dropdown menu.

I Love My PADI Pro Contest 2018

I Heart PADI Pro B2B Blog Graphic

As PADI Professionals, you not only introduce new divers to the underwater world, but you inspire new passions, encourage exploration, and mobilize future conservationists. We recognize the difference you are making in your communities, and we would like to give your students the opportunity to show their appreciation by nominating you in the I Love My PADI Pro contest.

We’ve asked our divers to tell us about the impact their PADI Pro has made in their lives and, if they nominate you, you’ll automatically go in the running to win a PADI x Seiko watch (and they’ll have the chance to win PADI swag). PADI divers can visit the official I Love My PADI Pro contest page to submit their entry.


Want to help spread the word? Below are a few sample text options to share on your social media accounts, in email, or on your website to encourage your students to participate. Remember, you know yourself and your students the best. If these samples don’t exactly match your tone and voice, feel free to adjust them accordingly. Don’t forget the official hashtag for the contest: #Love4PADIPros

Sample Text:

Option 1: Have you heard about @PADI’s #Love4PADIPros contest? If you thought I was a great PADI <insert level of membership>, you can nominate me by using this link:

Option 2: We have a lot of love for our PADI Pros here and we know you do too. If you think your instructor went above and beyond – or one of our Divemasters always has a smile at the ready, let them know by nominating them for @PADI’s #Love4PADIPros contest here:

Option 3: @PADI has just launched their #Love4PADIPros contest! If you think one of our PADI Pros deserves a shoutout (and a Seiko watch!) nominate them in the contest today here:

PADI Social Channels:


Twitter @padi

Instagram @paditv

Seiko Social Channels:


Instagram @seikowatchusa

To download other social images and sample posts, please visit the PADI Pros’ Site.

We appreciate all that you do and look forward to hearing from your students!

The 13 Different Types of Divemasters

A PADI Divemaster wears many hats: gear-wrangler, underwater guide, photographer, and sometimes even counselor. Over time, each divemaster develops a personal style, specializing in their own interests be it fish identification, or perhaps local history. Below are a few types of divemasters you may encounter:

The Comedian

The Comedian – The comedian divemaster delivers a dive briefing full of one-liners with the timing of a standup comic. The jokes aren’t always funny, but what they lack in quality, they make up for in quantity.

The Navigator – Even when visibility is so bad you can’t see your own fins, The Navigator somehow manages to bring the group back within a few meters of the exit point. At dive sites with a near-featureless bottom, The Navigator always finds the rocky outcropping full of life in a literal sea of nothingness.

The Prankster – If you’ve ever found yourself mobbed by fish only to discover someone put a cheese sandwich in your BC pocket – you’ve met the prankster DM. Other signature moves include Kool-Aid powder in the dive bootie and talc powder handprints in inappropriate places.

The scout

The Scout – The Scout was a shark in previous life. This divemaster can spot the faintest flicker of a big animal in the blue, and ably steers your dive group away from herds of others.

The Documentarian – The Documentarian divemaster has one eye on the group and the other behind the camera. This type of divemaster ensures every guest has a photo or video to post on social media after the dive, and challenges the Fish Whisperer as the most popular type of DM.

The Fish Whisperer – When The Fish Whisperer divemaster is around, all the bucket list animals come out to say hello. This type of DM can coax an eel out of its hole, speak fluent whale, and get their teeth cleaned by shrimp.

The Storyteller

The Storyteller – A Storyteller DM knows the backstory of every shipwreck, and the origins of every dive site name. Their stories are so entertaining, you won’t want to know whether they’re true or not.

The Most Fascinating  Divemaster in the Ocean –  The Most Fascinating DM has “been there, dove that.” This DM learned to dive before boats were invented, and Conservation International insisted they start a digital logbook to preserve the world’s forests. This DM was there when Bikini Atoll was a one-piece and once met a Cousteau.

The Cat Herder – You’re always in good hands when diving with The Cat Herder. These DMs have developed an eerie prescience: able to predict when a diver is going to or chase a fish into the depths, or linger too long photographing a coral head. The Cat Herder is always ready to wake a diver from their trance and bring them safely back to the group.

The Medic

The Medic – Whether you have an earache, a scrape or a stingy spot, The Medic divemaster is always prepared with a kind word and something to soothe the pain.

The Critter Nerd – A Critter Nerd knows the difference between a nudibranch and a flat worm and can identify their favorite marine gastropod mollusk – in Latin. They’re typically good friends with The Fish Whisperer who helps unite the nerd with the nembrotha lineolata.

The Mechanic – The Q of kit, the MacGyver of maritime activities, The Mechanic once made a rebreather from an old microwave and some surgical tubing. Whenever The Mechanic is around, no one misses a dive due to a gear problem.

The Concierge – More valuable above water than below, The Concierge knows the best place to fuel up before a morning dive, or unwind after a long day at the beach.


If you’re a PADI Divemaster looking to develop your personal style or discover your savant skill, enroll in a continuing education course such as:

PADI Fish Identification or Underwater Naturalist
Digital Underwater Photographer
Equipment Specialist (or a manufacturer’s equipment repair course)
DAN First Aid for Hazardous Marine Life Injuries

PADI Member Forum 2018

PADI, its global network of divers, professional members and dive centers have a responsibility to be a force for good in a constantly changing world.  To this end, PADI Member Forum 2018 promises to be truly inspiring as we share with you PADI’s vision for the future and your role in our mission to be best in and for the world.

We will look back at 2017 and then forward to a year that promises to be exciting and innovative for you and your divers.  Member Forum Topics* include:

  • 2017 Year in Review
  • New for 2018
  • PADI Standards and New Programs
  • Risk Management
  • Course Pricing
  • NEW My PADI Club
  • Project AWARE

Register Now

Attendance will count as one seminar credit. Registration is free but pre-registration is recommended.

Dates and locations are subject to change and are continuously being added, please check back frequently.

We look forward to 2018 and another year of striving to be best in and for the world.

*Topics subject to change

Take Part in the Fourth Annual PADI Women’s Dive Day on Saturday 21 July 2018

For the past three years, divers from every corner of the globe have come together for PADI Women’s Dive Day to bond over their love of the ocean and a passion for diving. This growing tradition will continue on 21 July 2018, further strengthening and supporting the female dive community through a day of fun, adventure and camaraderie.

PADI Dive Centers and Resorts hosted more than 884 events in 85 countries last year for the third annual PADI Women’s Dive Day on 15 July 2017. Since the 2015 inaugural event, the celebration has continued to gain momentum as new and experienced divers gear up for everything from high tea on the high seas to shark dives and underwater cleanups. As a result, PADI female certifications increased noticeably year over year.

This was possible thanks to the enthusiasm and participation from PADI Members around the world who got behind this initiative. Let’s do it again for 2018, only bigger. More new divers. More ambassadors for the underwater world.

Participate in PADI Women’s Dive Day 2018 to strengthen and grow the female dive community, attract new women to the sports of scuba diving and freediving, and motivate existing female divers to get back in the water and continue their dive training.

Start planning your 2018 PADI Women’s Dive Day event on 21 July 2018 using these simple steps. 

  1. Decide what type of event to host. The type of event to host is completely up to you! Whether you conduct PADI Women’s Dive Day themed courses, have a family-oriented open day, host fun dives or even a girls’ night out with your divers, only your imagination limits your event.
  2. PADI Retail and Resort Members, register your event on the PADI Women’s Dive Day Event Locator. By registering your event, your dive center/resort will be included on the Event Locator at  To register your event, ensure you are logged into the Pros’ Site with your PADI Dive Center or Resort account (not an Individual Member account), go to ‘My Account’ page of the PADI Pros’ Site, and click on ‘Register your Women’s Dive Day event(s)’. Follow the on-screen instructions to quickly and easily add your event.
  3. PADI Professionals hosting an event not affiliated with a dive center/resort are encouraged to share their event information with their regional PADI office (PADI Americas:; PADI Asia Pacific:; PADI EMEA:
  4. Promote your event. Use different platforms to help get the word out about your event – email, social media, advertisements (print, online and in-store), and event calendars. Be sure to tag your social posts with #padiwomen to be part of the global conversation.
  5. Post Event Follow-Up. Follow up with all your PADI Women’s Dive Day event participants afterward. A simple “thanks for being with us” keeps divers engaged and encourages them to continue diving with you. Don’t forget to include links, telephone and a call to action. And be sure your success stories and photos with the marketing team at your PADI Regional Headquarters! Tag event photos that you post on social media with #padiwomen to feed into PADI’s social channels.

PADI Retail and Resort Members: Register your 2018 PADI Women’s Dive Day event now! 

Stopping the Sting

Written by DAN staff

Marine life stings are an uncommon, but unfortunate reality of exploring the underwater world. No matter how hard you try, you can’t entirely eliminate the risk of marine life stings for yourself or your student divers. Know how to reduce risk, treat injuries, and keep your students more sting-free and happily diving this year.

Jellyfish in an aquarium with blue water


The name “jellyfish” refers to an enormous number of marine animals belonging to the phylum Cnidarian. While some species, like the Box Jellyfish, can cause life-threatening health complications with their venom, the majority of jellyfish encountered by divers are significantly less lethal. Jellyfish stings typically range from painless, imperceptive numbness, to burning reactions with mild to moderate blistering.

Student divers may be too excited and task-focused on their first dives to keep an eye out for jellyfish, so exposure protection is important. Have students use dive skins, wetsuits or dry suits as appropriate to protect their skin. In locations where the jellyfish populations are prominent, it’s possible to be stung by almost invisible strands or tentacle pieces carried in the current. Exposure suits are the best bet for injury prevention in these areas.

SI_DAN_Jellyfish 2

If stung, irrigate the area with generous amounts of vinegar to prevent further envenomation, remove any visible tentacles with tweezers or protective barriers, and wash the area with a seawater or saline solution. Irrigating with freshwater can cause further envenomation. Using painkillers, anti-inflammatory medications, or topical anesthetics can help remedy discomfort, as can immersing the area in hot water or icing the injury for 30 to 90 minutes.

Life threatening reactions are rare, but possible, and are characterized by severe pain, nausea, vomiting, shortness of breath, muscle spasms, low blood pressure, dysrhythmias, and cardiovascular failure. Follow emergency care procedures and quickly get the patient to professional medical care in these cases.

Fire Coral

Fire coral are colonial marine cnidarians that can envenomate humans through direct skin contact and cause burning skin reactions. The coral often appears yellow-green or brownish and frequently has branchy formations, although this can vary based on its environment. Divers can prevent injury by avoiding fire coral contact or by using exposure protection, such as dive skins or gloves.


Fire coral injuries typically present as a burning sensation that can last several hours, followed by a rash that may last for several days. The rash will often subside after a day or two, only to reappear several days or weeks later. Treat fire coral injuries by rinsing the affected area with vinegar and keeping the area clean, dry, and aerated. Redness and blisters will likely develop. Allow the injury to heal on its own, do not further irrigate the area or puncture the blisters.

Fire coral injuries are rarely serious, but can complicate open wounds and result in tissue death, so be sure to seek qualified medical attention if you or a student has a rash in the area of an open wound.

For more information on marine life injuries, visit


How to Get the Divemaster Job of Your Dreams (Part 1)

Your PADI Divemaster certification can open the door to a fun and rewarding career anywhere in the world, but landing a great job takes work. You can’t be like a sea anemone and wait for the perfect job to drift by. Use the strategies below to outmaneuver the competition and snatch up your dream job.

Do You Have the Skills Employers Expect?
For the most part, business owners would rather hire someone with experience rather than train a newbie. Review the list below to ensure when a potential employer asks if you have experience filling tanks, working on a boat, etc. – you can answer yes!

  • DSD Leader credential – By completing the PADI Discover Scuba Diving Leader internship, a Divemaster can conduct PADI Discover Scuba® (DSD) programs in a pool or confined water. This skill makes you a valuable asset to any dive operation and, because it is an optional part of the Divemaster course, gives you an advantage over other job applicants.
  • Boat Basics – PADI Divemasters, especially those hoping to work in resort areas, need to know their way around a boat. Familiarize yourself with boat terminology, local laws, and make sure you remember those knot tying skills. If you don’t have a lot of boat diving knowledge, consider taking the PADI Boat Diver Speciality course.
  • Minor Equipment Repairs – Divemasters spend a lot of time helping divers with their gear. If you don’t know how to handle minor gear issues, enroll in the PADI Equipment Specialist course and/or purchase the PADI Equipment Specialist Touch
  • Emergency Oxygen Administration – Every dive leader should be familiar with how to administer oxygen in the event of a diving emergency. Most dive operations will expect you to have this skill – in addition to current first aid and CPR training.  Learn more about the PADI Emergency Oxygen Provider Specialty. If you already have this certification, talk to a PADI Course Director about getting trained to teach this course.
  • Ability to Fill Tanks – The ability to fill scuba tanks is an essential skill for Divemasters. To distinguish yourself from other candidates, you may want to get a visual cylinder inspection certification.

What Makes You Better Than the Rest?
Why are you the best candidate for a Divemaster job? What can you do better than anyone else? If you don’t have an answer to these questions, consider picking up one of the specialised skills below:

  1. Boat Skills – Resort and liveaboard operators need staff members who can do more than just lead dives. If you can drive a skiff, have a boat handling certification, know basic boat engine or compressor maintenance, or have a captain’s license, you will be twice as valuable as a Divemaster who does not have these skills.
  2. Equipment Service Technician –  Enroll in manufacturer-sponsored courses such as regulator repair, BCD maintenance and repair, etc. Though you may find yourself at a workbench more often than a dive boat, this can be your foot in the door.
  3. Know Your Local Marine Life – Most Divemasters have a good (but not great) knowledge of local marine life. By learning about the behaviors and habitats of your local critters, you’ll be able to help divers get more from their dive experience (and hopefully show their gratitude in tips). PADI’s Fish ID and Underwater Naturalist Specialty courses are a good place to start.
  4. Photo/Video Expertise – Capturing great images of marine life and divers having fun is a huge asset to any dive business. Photos and video are an essential part of any businesses’ marketing strategy, yet many dive operators don’t have time to get them. Divemasters can also teach the PADI Digital Underwater Photographer Specialty Course (under the direction of a PADI Instructor) after receiving training from a PADI Course Director.
  5. Adaptive Techniques – PADI Divemasters can become a certified PADI Adaptive Techniques Support Diver (English only) and learn techniques to apply when training and diving with physically and mentally challenged divers.

Retail Recommendations – A Divemaster looking for work in a non-resort location should learn everything they can about the major manufacturer’s product lines. Knowing the features and benefits of popular BCDs, regulators and computers makes you a valuable employee to retailers.

Resorts – Divemasters looking for work in resort areas should be familiar with local places to eat, drink and have fun – easy right? Another thing DM’s should know is how to drive a large passenger van. Many dive operators in resort areas have a 15+ passenger van to pick up guests at their hotel(s) and to shuttle divers to/from the dive boat. Check local licensing requirements, some areas require a special driver’s license endorsement.

Knowing more than one language is also advantageous for Divemasters working in resort areas. The “best” second language to learn will depend on the area. Visit the Employment Board area of the PADI Pros Site to learn which languages are in demand.

Check in next month for Part 2 and find out about those extras that can put you in the winning seat.

PADI Wins TAUCHEN Award for the 20th time in 20 Years!

For the 20th consecutive year, PADI has been awarded the prestigious TAUCHEN Award for Best Diver Training Organisation. The TAUCHEN Awards are often referred to as the ‘Oscars of the Dive Industry’ and each year the highly popular German diving magazine, which focuses on dive travel, equipment and industry news, invites its readers to vote for their preferences in 17 different industry categories. PADI has been the unwavering favourite diver training organisation, taking home the coveted bronze dolphin statuette for the Best Diver Training Organisation every year, since the award’s inception.

This award is a tribute to the excellence of PADI Members around the world and the quality training they deliver every day.

This year the awards were presented on 25th January, 2018, in conjunction with the BOOT Trade Show in Düsseldorf, Germany.

“I’d like to dedicate this award to PADI Members throughout the globe and thank them for their continued support of, and loyalty to, the PADI organisation. Thank you also for your expert diver training, contribution to diver safety and outreach to the diving community. Together we are the way the world learns to dive.”

– Mark Spiers, Vice President of Training, Sales and Field Services for PADI Europe, Middle East and Africa.


1st Quarter 2018 Edition of The Undersea Journal Now Available Via PADI Library App


Every quarter The Undersea Journal is filled with stories and articles that help you stay informed and inspired as a PADI Professional. In addition to choosing a printed magazine there are several digital reading options for this useful publication:

1. Using the PADI Library App (Apple App Store | Play):

  • From your mobile device, open your Library in your PADI Library App, download and view.
  • On your computer, select Certification Paks from the Log In tab at the top of From there you’ll be able to view the magazine in the Online Manuals portal.

2. Via the Zinio app on your computer or mobile device.

3. As a PDF on the PADI Pros’ Site. Log on to the Pros’ Site and click on the References tab. You can download the entire magazine or choose to download it in sections.

Each quarter, the latest edition of the publication will be added to the PADI Library.

If you’re a digital subscriber, you’ll continue to receive an email notification that your publication is available for viewing on Zinio. If you’ve opted for the printed version, it will continue to be delivered to your mailing address.

Five Tips for Managing Your Online Presence

When it comes to consumer decisions online, credibility is everything. Multiple surveys show that most people trust online reviews as much as personal recommendations. This makes it more important than ever to manage your online presence and ensure your good reputation stays intact.

Here are five tips to guide you in managing your business’s reputation online.

  1. Create your own positive presence. Customers are going to look you up online, so make sure they find what you want them to know.
  • Promote your business via your website, blog and social media sites, and put effort into creating relevant and informational content about what you offer.
  • Write short bios about yourself, your company story, what your business does, and include great photos or video.
  • Claim free business listings on appropriate online directories and social media networks. There is no cost and you control the company description and general information to present your business in the best light.
  • Pro-actively ask customers for positive reviews. This is an essential part of any online reputation management strategy. Often, people won’t think to post a review, but will be more than happy to when asked. Having positive reviews on your website is a great way to generate quality content.
  • Positive and optimized content can show up higher than the negative comments on search engine results pages. If you have a dominant number of positive reviews, your chances of losing a potential customer from the few critical comments is much less.


  1. Be active on social media. If you have social media profiles, you need to update content regularly.
  • Because your profiles are a reflection of your business, you want to ensure they are current and energized.
  • Always remember that social media is a public forum. Never post images or comments you don’t want the whole world to see.
  1. Listen to what others are saying. People are going to talk, so you need to stay on top of what is being said about your business.
  • Reviews or comments don’t go away. You need to take control of what is being said, whether it’s good or bad.
  • View your Twitter, Facebook, LinkedIn, and Google+ pages and accounts “as public” or “as Page Visitor” so you can see what they look like when someone stumbles upon them.
  • Set up a Google Alert on your business name, or use another online reputation management tool. This allows you to track any mention of your business and see overall reactions to your brand online.
  • Add a feedback form to your website or send customer satisfaction surveys to your customers to hear their thoughts and sentiments directly.
  1. Be proactive, not reactive. Negative comments can be addressed in a way that shows potential customers that you care about your consumers.
  • Some public relations professionals advise not to respond publicly in some cases, because your response has the risk of fueling more negative comments. On the flip-side, there are also strong advocates of replying and using the situation to create a positive outcome. Carefully consider the potential upsides and downsides of responding to a negative post before deciding.
  • Definitely don’t respond if you’re going to be aggressive, and never accuse a reviewer of being fake. Take time to calm down before responding.
  • A good guide is to address concerns in a timely manner and actively try to remedy the situation.

PADI Pros should stay up to date on their linkedin profiles

  1. Respond professionally. Responding to negative comments in a professional and positive manner can actually result in an overall positive experience and outcome.
  • Even if you don’t change the negative reviewer’s perspective, a well-crafted response shows others that you care and you want to create positive experiences.
  • If you do choose to respond to negative or critical comments follow these guidelines:

– Acknowledge the issue or complaint by thanking the person for sharing the concern.

– Empathize with the person and explain that you understand the concern.

– Ask what you can do to fix the problem.

– Explain the steps that your business takes to provide the best customer experience possible.

– Share the steps you are going to take to follow up or look into the matter.

– Offer some incentive for giving your business a second chance.

Businesses are more vulnerable to online attacks on their reputation than ever before. Taking proactive actions to optimize positive reviews and manage negative ones will help you minimize this vulnerability.

For more information about best business practices, marketing and customer service, plan to attend a 2018 PADI Business Academy in your area.