Training Bulletin Live 4th Quarter 2017

The Fourth Quarter Training Bulletin Live webinars are coming soon. As always, we will be discussing the latest standards changes, providing background information on the updates and insight into how these can be integrated into your training.

Join us live in your chosen language on the dates below. If you miss the live event, registration will ensure that you get a follow up email linking you to the recording.

4th Quarter:

English: 24/10/2017

Italian: 25/10/2017

Spanish: 26/10/2017

Arabic: 30/10/2017

Dutch: 31/10/2017

Portuguese: 02/11/2017

French: 06/11/2017

Polish: 07/11/2017

German: 08/11/2017

Scandinavian/Nordic: 09/11/2017

Russian: 15/11/2017

If you have any questions regarding the webinar you can email training.emea@padi.com. We look forward to speaking to you during the webinar.

Risk Factors for Heart Disease

Written by DAN staff

Heart health is essential to an active lifestyle that includes scuba diving. Symptoms of heart conditions are often subtle or easily missed, and in some cases, the first indication of a serious cardiac problem may be a heart attack. That’s why it’s imperative for divers to truthfully complete the RSTC Medical Statement and disclose their health histories before starting training. It’s also important for you to know the primary risk factors of heart disease because they apply to dive professionals just as much as student divers.

3D illustration of Heart, medical concept.

Hypertension

Hypertension, or high blood pressure, is a contributing factor in 13 percent of cardiac deaths, and may lead to a thickening and weakening of the tissues in the heart. This change in heart tissue can cause disturbances in heart rhythms, and elevate the risk of stroke, heart attack and kidney failure. While high blood pressure alone may seem relatively benign, it’s important to recognize that it can result in some very serious consequences if left unaddressed.

Smoking

While smoking causes a well-known laundry list of cardiopulmonary issues, it’s also a leading cause of cardiac diseases. Smoking increases the risk of coronary heart disease, peripheral vascular disease, stroke, sudden cardiac death and cancer. It also increases blood pressure and lipid levels and can result in sustained, low-level inflammation that causes the cardiovascular system to deteriorate, and may increase DCS risk.

Hyperlipidemia

Hyperlipidemia or high cholesterol may double a person’s 10-year risk of dying, and increases risk of clotting conditions, high blood pressure and stroke. High cholesterol levels rarely give obvious symptoms until it cause a serious cardiac issue. Lipid levels should be tested regularly by a physician and can be controlled through diet and medication.

Inactivity

Inactive people are twice as likely to develop heart disease as active people. Regular exercise helps to maintain both health and a capacity for sustained exercise. Also, exercise can slow a decline in exercise capacity due to aging and reduce risks of many health-related hazards.

Obesity

Obesity can be a difficult subject to address, but it significantly elevates a person’s risk of cardiac problems, among other hazards. Divers who struggle with obesity may need to exert themselves more while diving, which places additional strain on their heart, and may have difficulty dealing with the physical demands of strenuous dives, putting them at an increased risk of injury.

For more information on cardiac risks and diving, visit DAN.org/Health

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A PADI Divemaster Certification is just the Beginning

Working in a PADI Dive Center, Rescue Diver Lucy Crow not only gained her PADI Divemaster qualification but so much more.

“I started working with Ocean Turtle Diving doing some work experience. I had wanted to to do my PADI Divemaster for a while and decided that it was a great opportunity to start it with them. I must say that it was one of the best experiences of my diving life.

I am not a big reader most days, however, I started reading the Divemaster Manual and found it so interesting. If there were bits that I didn’t understand or had questions on, I knew that I would have the team’s full support to help me out.

It came to the theory exam day and because of my PADI Instructor’s support I felt confident about what I had learnt. I went in with a smile. We sat down as a group and went through the manual. There were three students there and we were all as happy as each other. We then completed the exam and all came out smiling. I could now focus on getting through the pool sessions and becoming fit enough to meet these performance requirements.

By January I had not only completed my PADI Divemaster course but also all of the training in the dive centre itself. I really enjoyed learning the ins and outs of how the dive centre ran and meeting new and exciting customers almost every day. There was always something new to learn.  I asked if I could continue to work there and was given an amazing opportunity for a Saturday job. Over six months later I am still working at the dive centre and love it.

Being a PADI Divemaster is not only about having professional level knowledge but also about being aware that people learning to dive may be nervous or scared. The best thing about working in the dive centre has been the staff and the customers combined. It is like my second family here. They have built up not only my knowledge of diving but my confidence overall.”

PADI announces its 2018 Shows!

PADI has been busy planning its 2018 events schedule and is excited to announce that it will be exhibiting at the following shows:

Salon de la Plongée (Paris, France): 12 – 15 January.
Boot (Dusseldorf, Germany): 20 – 28 January – PADI Village.
Salón de la Inmersión (Barcelona, Spain): 23 – 25 February – PADI Village.
DMEX (Dubai, UAE): 27 February – 3 March.
EUDI (Bologna, Italy): 2 – 4 March – PADI Village.

PADI will also have a presence at these shows:

Moscow Dive Show (Moscow, Russia): 1 – 4 February.
Duikvaker (Houten, Netherlands): 3 – 4 February.
Podwodna Przygoda (Warsaw, Poland): 17 – 18 February.
DykMassan (Stockholm, Sweden): 17 – 18 March.

Additional 2018 shows will be added as they are confirmed. Check in regularly for an updated list.

We hope you’ll join us at one or more of the shows. If you’d like to partner with us in one of the PADI villages please contact your Regional Manager for more information.

The Magic of Multiple-Level Dive Training

Written by John Kinsella

PADI dive training

It’s not too often you come across something that gets absolutely no hits on Google. Multiple-Level Training is one of those things. Where you will find it is under Organization in the Teaching Techniques section of PADI’s Guide to Teaching. If it’s been a while since you checked it out, take a moment to read it again, especially if you want to boost your Divemaster and IDC enrollment.

The basic idea is to have several different levels of training happening at the same time and at the same place. Done right, multiple-level training is not only an efficient use of resources; it’s a powerful way to motivate existing divers to consider going pro.

The key is planning and careful scheduling (there’s a great sample schedule in the Guide to Teaching) and to build in time for divers to mingle and socialize. It also helps to have a few certified assistants. Consider these strategies to maximize the cross promotional benefits of multiple-level training:

Have all divers together for the area orientation. Let everyone know what’s going on and take some time to introduce the divers to each other: “Welcome to the dive site, we have three activities going on this morning, the Divemaster Mapping exercise, the Advanced Open Water Diver Navigation Dive, and Open Water Dive One.” Cover the usual points, make sure to mention who is doing what (by name), then split up into individual course groups to finish the briefings.

Keep people moving and don’t waste their time. In this example, you could overview the Divemaster Mapping exercise seamlessly with the area orientation before breaking up the groups. This has the benefit of clearly highlighting an interesting part of Divemaster training to both the AOW and OW divers. Then have a certified assistant keep an eye on the Open Water Divers while they assemble their gear and get ready for your predive brief. Meanwhile you’re running through the (detailed) brief for the AOW Navigation dive and setting the divers up to practice their navigation patterns on land. (Which will certainly get the Open Water Divers attention.)

Make good use of your own time. Once you’ve covered the AOW brief, have those divers assemble and set up their gear and present themselves for the dive at a specific time. Head over to the entry point where the OW Divers are ready to go and your certified assistants have the shot line already positioned. Enter, run the dive and when you exit you find the AOW divers ready to go. You supervise that dive from the surface and while the AOW divers are breaking down their gear post dive, you debrief the OW divers before you debrief them.

By now the Divemaster candidates are wrapping up their mapping exercise and you check with them before everyone settles down to enjoy lunch.

All you have to do now is sit back and let the buzz do your marketing work for you.

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Put the Master Scuba Diver Program to Work

The PADI Master Scuba Diver™ rating is often described as “the black belt of scuba.” While most people know what a karate black belt is, entry-level divers may not understand the prestige of the Master Scuba Diver rating. You need to inspire all your customers to join the elite group of divers who reach this level.SI_MSD_OWOLJan07-0701

Why? Because it’s not only the ultimate rating that signifies an accomplished and experienced diver, but also because you gain a customer who takes eight courses, commits to more than 50 dives, and will likely purchased a full set of gear. There are at least three reasons why you should implement or bolster your Master Scuba Diver program today:

  1. Offer and fill more courses. The Master Scuba Diver program sets goals for your customers and they enroll in the courses needed to reach their goals.
  2. Support active divers. The more training your divers receive, the more dives they make, the more gear they purchase, and then they dive even more.
  3. Create loyal customers. Your diver retention rates will increase as your divers become more competent and comfortable in the water.

Here are a just few ideas for raising awareness and interest in your Master Scuba Diver program:

  • Create a wall of fame in your store to recognize customers who have achieved the prestigious Master Scuba Diver rating.
  • Publicly chart the progress of current Advanced Open Water and Rescue Divers to encourage friendly competition among students.
  • Invite Master Scuba Divers to be guest speakers at your next course orientation.
  • Give special recognition to your Master Scuba Divers at a dive club meeting or store BBQ.
  • Develop a five specialty program for your area that showcase local diving, or perhaps focuses on the environment – Cold Water Master Scuba Diver or Eco-Master Scuba Diver.
  • Offer an exclusive dive trip only for Master Scuba Divers.

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Welcome to DIVE 2017

Once again, PADI Europe, Middle East and Africa will be exhibiting at DIVE, taking place at the NEC, Birmingham (UK) on the 21st and 22nd October. Visit the PADI stand, where the staff will be on hand to answer all your questions and show you our latest products and features. Get interactive on the iPads at our Touch stations.
2-4-1 Ticket offers for PADI Divers and PADI Pros!*

Good news! As a PADI Pro, you’re eligible for the 2-4-1 ticket offer. Simply go online and book in advance using the discount code PADI2-4-1INSTRUCTOR. Alternatively, you can book on the day and you’ll receive your complimentary ticket at the kiosk. Don’t forget that photo ID must be brought to the show to claim the offer. Any of your divers who completed a PADI Discover Scuba Diving Experience or a PADI Open Water Diver course on or after 1st November 2016, are also eligible, they can claim the offer using discount code PADI2-4-1NEWDIVER.

Find out what’s on:

For the first time in the history of the DIVE show, you now have the opportunity to attend two full days of great workshops and seminars conducted by PADI experts**. You will receive 1 credit for every 3 workshops attended as you develop your professional knowledge from a training and business perspective. Download and complete the Registration Form and bring it with you to the show to gain credits.

Date Time Seminar/Event Location
21.10.17 9.00 – 10.00 Emergency First Response – Boosting Your Business NEC Piazza Suite 7
21.10.17 10.15 – 11.00 Approved Youth Training Centres – Working with Children NEC Piazza Suite 7
21.10.17 11.15 – 12.00 My PADI Image – professional scuba imaging for the 21st Century NEC Piazza Suite 7
21.10.17 12.00 – 12.30 General Q and A NEC Piazza Suite 7
21.10.17 12.30 – 13.15 Leading the Industry -PADI’s Vision for 2018 NEC Piazza Suite 7
21.10.17 13.30 – 14.15 Organising Dive Trips – spotlight on South Africa NEC Piazza Suite 7
21.10.17 14.30 – 15.15 Go Pro in the Dive Industry NEC Piazza Suite 7
21.10.17 15.15 – 16.15 Risk Management for PADI Professionals NEC Piazza Suite 7
21.10.17 16.30 – 18.00 Member Forum NEC Piazza Suite 7
22.10.17 8.30 – 9.30 CDTC – your questions answered NEC Piazza Suite 7
22.10.17 9.45 – 10.45 Facebook Friendly – Using Social Media in the dive industry NEC Piazza Suite 7
22.10.17 11.00 – 12.00 Winter is Coming – business tips for working during the off season NEC Piazza Suite 7
22.10.17 12.00 – 12.30 General Q and A NEC Piazza Suite 7
22.10.17 12.30 – 13.15 Leading the Industry -PADI’s Vision for 2018 NEC Piazza Suite 7
22.10.17 13.30 – 14.15 Project AWARE® – Taking action against Marine Debris NEC Piazza Suite 7
22.10.17 14.30 – 15.15 Myth Busting – PADI Products and how to use them NEC Piazza Suite 7
22.10.17 15.30 – 16.15 Go Pro in the Dive Industry NEC Piazza Suite 7

We look forward to seeing you at Dive 2017!

*2-4-1 ticket offer is not valid with other ticket promotions. The two tickets will be charged at £14.50. All ticket offers are valid only when appropriate ID and proof of certification is shown on entry to the show.

** Spaces are limited and will be allocated on a first come, first served basis.

Medications and Diving

Written by DAN staff

Few divers can claim to have never used over-the-counter (OTC) drugs before a dive. Whether it’s a decongestant to deal with allergy symptoms or aspirin to deal with sore muscle, OTC drugs are perceived be less of a concern than prescription drugs. As a dive professional, you know there are risks associated with using OTC drugs before diving. What you don’t always know, however, is when students are self-medicating to make it possible to complete a dive or finish a course. By being clear about the effects of OTC drugs and sharing that information with your student divers, you can help them make good decisions during and after training.

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Antihistamines

Antihistamines, like diphenhydramine, are most often used to provide symptomatic relief of allergies, colds and motion sickness. Antihistamines often have side effects that include dryness of the mouth, nose and throat, visual disturbances, drowsiness, or undesired sedation and depression. They can also depress the central nervous system (CNS) and impair a diver’s ability to think clearly.

Decongestants

Decongestants are vasoconstricting drugs that narrow the blood vessels of the nasal airways and often temporarily improve breathing. Common active ingredients include pseudoephedrine and phenylephrine. Decongestants may cause mild CNS stimulation and side effects like nervousness, excitability, restlessness, dizziness, weakness, and a forceful or rapid heartbeat. These drugs may have significant undesirable effects on divers, and should be avoided by individuals with diabetes, asthma, or cardiovascular disease.

Anti-Inflammatories and Analgesics

These drugs are typically used for temporary relief of minor aches and pains. Keep in mind that these may relieve symptoms, but the injury is still present. Limitations in range of motion due to an injury, swelling or pain can put a diver at risk of additional injury. Active ingredients include naproxen sodium and ibuprofen, with side effects such as heartburn, nausea, abdominal pain, headache, dizziness and drowsiness. These should be avoided by individuals with heartburn, ulcers, bleeding problems or asthma. They may also have interactions with individuals using anticoagulants, insulin and nonsteroidal anti-inflammatories (NSAIDs).

While in many cases the use of these drugs is warranted and relatively low-risk, unwanted side effects, drug reactions and reactions to increased partial pressures of nitrogen can raise injury risk during a dive. Susceptibility to adverse side effects can vary greatly from person to person, and divers should refrain from taking a new medication for the first time before diving. Many medical professionals will advise anyone who requires medication in order to dive to wait until symptoms resolve to resume diving. If you have any questions about the safety of an OTC drug, seek an evaluation from a qualified healthcare professional.

For more information on OTC drugs and diving, or safe diving practices, visit DAN.org/Health

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Do Your Part – Dive Against Debris®

Written by Megan Denny

For most people, ocean pollution is out of sight, out of mind, but as a dive professional you know that in many places there are significant debris problems lurking beneath the waves. That’s why Project AWARE® created Dive Against Debris® as a citizen science program that empowers you and your fellow divers to deliver critically needed data about the marine debris found in underwater habitats.

Since Dive Against Debris began in 2011:

  • More than 30,000 divers have participated
  • 900,000+ pieces of trash have been collected and reported
  • Thousands of entangled marine animals have been discovered

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The marine debris data reported by divers is essential to addressing and preventing ocean pollution. For example, last year, 26 percent of all debris items reported through Dive Against Debris was abandoned, lost or otherwise discarded fishing gear (ALDFG). ALDFG, also known as ghost gear, refers to derelict fishing gear that continues to capture fish and other marine animals long after it’s been lost or abandoned by fishermen). Ghost gear is devastating to marine habitats, entangling and killing hundreds of species including seals, turtles, dolphins and whales.  In a 2007 survey, NOAA estimated there are 85,000+ lobster and crab ghost traps in the Florida KeysNational Marine Sanctuary alone.

Through their Partnerships Against Trash, Project AWARE is committed to developing solutions with individuals, governments, NGOs and businesses including alliances such as the Global Ghost Gear Initiative (GGGI). Just this year, GGGI initiated ghost gear prevention and recovery programs in Alaska, Maine and the United Kingdom.

The ocean we love needs all hands on deck to protect it. By encouraging your student divers and customers to Dive Against Debris, we can improve the health of ocean ecosystems and provide valuable information about underwater debris to policy makers.

Reporting Marine Debris Just Got Easier

Project AWARE’s new Dive Against Debris app for Android and iOS makes it easy to report marine debris data. With the Dive Against Debris app you can:Open Water Manual (Redesign)

  • Quickly report debris by choosing from a list of common debris items
  • Easily add a dive site location using your mobile device’s GPS
  • Copy information from a previous submission at the same dive site.
  • No data connection? No problem. The app will store your data as a draft for you to complete and submit once connectivity is restored.

The free app is available for download after August 21 from the App Store or Google Play. Download it to report marine debris data and help spread the word.

Help Improve Our Oceans

Written by Megan Denny

National Geographic estimates 5.25 trillion pieces of trash end up in the ocean every year. That’s about 700 pieces of trash for every man, woman and child on the planet. And, a lot of that rubbish is plastic. The volume and types of trash in the ocean affects all marine creatures, from the smallest zooplankton to the largest whales.

Trash

As a dive professional, you’re uniquely qualified to help turn the tide toward a healthier ocean. There are many ways to make a difference including participating in year-round Project AWARE® Dive Against Debris® surveys or organizing a special event on Ocean Conservancy’s International Coastal Cleanup Day. Here are a few suggestions and examples of what other PADI® Pros are doing for International Coastal Cleanup Day this September.

Saturday, 16 September

International Coastal Cleanup Day is an ideal way to do important work for the local community and raise awareness about your business. Here are some tips for running a successful cleanup event:

  • Get the word out – Send a short press release to local news organizations (templates and tools are available on the PADI Pros’ Site).
  • Stock up – Encourage divers to get equipped with mesh collection bags, knives and gloves. Invite topside participants to bring gardening gloves, but bring extra gloves for those who forget.
  • Buddy up – Invite local environmental organizations to participate and help get the word out.
  • Create incentives – Jack’s Diving Locker in Hawai’i offers a free rental tank and half off rental gear to divers participating in their shoreline and underwater cleanup. Their 2017 event takes place on International Coastal Cleanup Day at the Kailua-Kona Pier from 9am – noon.
  • Document your activities: create a recap video or slideshow to share on social media and with local news outlets. Here’s an example from Eco Dive Center in California.

This year, Eco Dive Center is working together with two fellow clubs from PCH Scubaand In2Deep Scuba for the 13th Annual Underwater Santa Monica Pier Cleanup on International Coastal Cleanup Day.

Take Action Year Round

You don’t need to wait for International Coastal Cleanup Day to take action. Through Dive Against Debris surveys, divers can remove debris throughout the year at any dive location across the globe. If you dive at the same site frequently, why not adopt it? Project AWARE provides a suite of survey tools and a yearly report on the state of your local dive site. Simply conduct Dive Against Debris surveys once a month and report the marine debris you find. Receive special recognition for your efforts in addition to the feel-good benefits of helping the planet and local community. Learn more at: projectaware.org/adoptadivesite.

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Make Good Choices

While out of the water there are things you can do to support a clean and healthy ocean.

  • Donate to Project AWARE – Challenge friends, family and your student divers to do the same by creating a fundraising campaign. Get started at org/support. You can also peruse fundraising campaigns from fellow ocean-lovers at Finathon.org.