Ustica is once again the leading actor in scuba diving with Italy Dive Fest by DAN and PADI

Ustica, 9 September 2017 – 320 scuba divers, 4000 dives in the Marine Protected Area, 84 medical visits performed, 36 official partners, 9 diving centers. And then professional workshops, conferences, themed evenings… The impressive numbers of Italy Dive Fest, an event organized by DAN Europe and PADI EMEA in Ustica, the Black Pearl of the Mediterranean, from August 28th to September 3rd.

Italy Dive Fest, a new format in the scuba diving industry that is strongly supported by PADI and DAN with the goal of revolutionizing the approach to diving by joining moments of celebration, fun, training and especially diving, is envisaged as an itinerant event that shall be repeated in the coming years around Italy is the comment of Fabio Figurella Regional Manager of PADI EMEA.

Italy Dive Fest has been a unique event and certainly one of the most beautiful and complex organized in recent years. It’s unique because it has allowed us to achieve a great goal: to create a real diving festival that brings together many of the largest companies and manufacturing houses of the diving industry, for the benefit of the participants, who have been able to see and test the latest news on the market. It was a one of a kind event also because of its rich content: in addition to diving and equipment testing, participants could choose from a broad spectrum of workshops, conferences and courses. Last but not least, this was made possible thanks to the support and collaboration shown by all the diving centers of the island. Our researchers, thanks to the collaboration of more than 300 divers, have managed to gather a large number of data and dive profiles that will become part of the database on which our scientific publications are based. States Laura Marroni, vice-president of DAN Europe.

The island quay, the meeting point of all the divers, hosted the Dive Village, where organizers and technical partners showed the 2017 news, interacting with the public and collaborating with diving centers.

Those who dived had the chance to conduct physiological tests performed by DAN Research – 125 monitored dives, with 105 Doppler and 80 echo-cardiographs – actively contributing to important studies on decompression mechanisms. DAN doctors have also conducted numerous free ORL visits, as part of an international campaign to prevent barotrauma.

After diving in the morning, divers could choose between a range of training and leisure activities. These included technical workshops conducted by Beuchat, Coltri, Scubapro, the PADI Business Academy, and even EFR first aid courses and DAN crossover instructors. The events were distributed in various locations, thus involving also the Island locals, while special conventions were signed with local hotels and restaurants.

This year Italy Dive Fest matched the 58th International Diving Expo (whose logo was sponsored by PADI through a scholarship), with its historical charm, exhibitions, guided hikes and, above all, Golden Trident and the International Academy of Underwater Sciences and Techniques Awards. The ceremony was hosted by the social event offered by PADI and DAN, in the striking coastline behind the lighthouse Punta Cavazzi. And here are the awards: Golden Trident to Dr. Danilo Cialoni, recognition of the research carried out on the immune pathophysiology; Academy Awards 2017 to DAN, in its 5 world components (America, Asia-Pacific, Europe, Japan and South Africa), for the tireless help provided to scuba divers since 1980; special Academy Award to PADI, for its effective action in promoting safety awareness in diving, diving sustainability and in particular for launching an international program (Scuola d’Amare, ndr) targeted to students of primary and secondary schools, to promote knowledge on the ocean and diving among young people.

However, the best show was enjoyed by the divers who dived in the breathtaking waters of the first Marine Protected Area in Italy: the sun, visibility up to 30 meters, barracudas, amberjacks, salemas, dentex, groopers in waters teeming with life.

Italy Dive Fest has been the climax of an underwater season full of events and initiatives, featuring the Ustica scene, with its history and tradition, and has reasserted the vitality of the Italian diving world.

This is a unique event – commented Massimo Casabianca (DAN Training Manager and PADI Instructor Trainer), a full and articulated one, where a training agency and an organization devoted to diving safety have involved key players of the diving industry. In so many years of experience, I had never seen anything like it.

Thanks to those who wanted and organized the event (PADI team, DAN team), to the numerous technical partners, the flagship of the diving industry (Aqualung, Beuchat, Coltri, FInclip, Mares, Nauticam, Scubapro, Suex, Suunto, Y-40 the Deep Joy), to the institutional partners (Soprintendenza del Mare-Regione Sicilia, Comune di Ustica, AMP Isola di Ustica, WWF, Università di Bologna/Sea Sentinel, Reef Check, Clean Sea, Green Bubbles), to the logistics partners (Gesap/Aeroporto di Palermo, Liberty Lines, PMO Travel), to the diving centers (Altamarea, Blue Diving, La Perla Nera, Lustrica, Mare Nostrum, Mister Jump, Orca, Profondo Blu, Ustica Diving) and to Claudio di Manao, who presented his book “Io sono il Mare”, animating an interesting round table on the protection of the marine environment and its future prospects.

Support Sea grass

We all could do with reducing our carbon footprint and one easy way is to support local and global sea grass conservation initiatives.

Known as the lungs of the ocean, sea grass can produce 10 litres of oxygen per 1m2 everyday! Sea grass meadows are also a fantastic carbon sink as they sequester carbon dioxide from the water and this can slow the effects of ocean acidification created by global warming. This beautiful plant could be the key to stabilising the negative effects of climate change.

Yet despite this, 29% of global sea grass beds have already disappeared with 7% more being lost per year. In an attempt to address this issue, the Marine Biology team at Gili Lankanfushi is conducting a sea grass regrowth experiment. At the resort we have sea grass growing in shallow lagoons around the island and in a 10m2 area on the south east side of the island, we have been collecting data on how fast sea grass regrows after it has been removed.

The experiment has currently been running for six months, so it is too early to be accurate, but results currently show that 10% of the area has signs of regrowth. To date, we are only seeing shoots of a robust species of sea grass called E.acoroides. This is a species found in the tropics in water depth of one to three metres with light wave action.

Aerial view of Lankanfushi Island and sea grass beds

In the beds we find nursery fish, crustaceans, worms and sea cucumbers using the leaves as a nursery and haven against the current. We also often see resident green sea turtles feeding on sea grass as it is their primary diet and they consume 2kg per day!

Marine Biologists are very pro sea grass because sea grass beds stabilise sediment and reduce erosion by creating a network of roots. They also increase the water clarity and quality by soaking up nutrients or chemicals that run into the water. If given the choice, we would regenerate the meadows surrounding the island as with an increased meadow size, the resort would benefit from cleaner and clearer water and an increased population of nursery fish species and green sea turtles. By regenerating the full size of our sea grass meadows we would also offset some of our carbon footprint.

We have been in touch with sea grass specialists from Seagrass Watch and SeagrassSpotter and hope to work with these global conservation projects in the future. We have learnt from their wealth of experience that it takes around 3-4 years to naturally replenish a small sized, single species sea grass meadow and around 10 years to replenish a large sized multi-species meadow. If we helped regrowth by planting sea grass seeds, the areas would be replenished in around 2 years.

This brilliant plant could be the key to stabilising the negative effects of climate change. We hope resorts in the Maldives consider regenerating their sea grass beds to help offset their carbon footprint.

PADI’s guest blogger Clare Baranowski introduces herself:

I am a marine zoologist from the UK who has worked throughout the tropics researching mega fauna and reef ecosystems in the Caribbean and Indian Ocean. I have experience monitoring and restoring coral and surveying manta, turtle and dolphin populations. I began my career as a science communicator before moving into research and management roles, this is why I incorporate outreach and education into every project I work on and I hope to continue this at Gili Lankanfushi.

Deep Blue Divers became 100% AWARE partner

Deep Blue Divers at Six Senses Laamu this week partnered with Project AWARE, a global non-profit organization, to join their growing number of 100% AWARE Partners who put ocean protection at the heart of their business. From August, 2017 Deep Blue Divers will make a regular donation to protect the underwater world our dive business relies on.

100% AWARE is a Partner Giving Program. All student divers who complete a course with a 100% AWARE dive center receive a Project AWARE limited edition card. It’s a great way to remind divers that the place where they learned to dive or furthered their diving education made a gift to protect the ocean on their behalf.

Deep Blue Divers at Six Senses Laamu is proud to join dedicated dive centers across the world who act locally and think globally.” says General Manager Marteyne van Well “We take pride in knowing that our donation to Project AWARE for every student diver who completes a diving course with us not only helps educate divers about ocean conservation but also supports Project AWARE’s mission to mobilize the world’s divers into a global force to protect the ocean one dive at a time.”

Deep Blue Divers has shown dedication to ocean conservation through their participation in Project AWARE activities. Their commitment to the 100% AWARE program makes them shine as they not only lead by example but demonstrate to their students the importance of supporting ocean protection. Thank you for leading the way,” says Alex Earl, Executive Director Project AWARE Foundation.

For additional information about Project AWARE’s 100% AWARE Partner program and to join the global movement for ocean protection, visit www.projectaware.org.

Please visit the website of Six Senses for more information

To eat or not to eat

As our understanding of the ocean grows, more people want to know where their food is coming from and how it landed on their plate. 

Global fisheries have been under pressure in recent decades due to the technological advancement of fishing fleets. We are now able to catch more fish at a faster rate and for some fish populations, this has resulted in dire consequences. They are not able to repopulate at a fast enough rate to combat declining numbers.

International research projects allow us to identify which fish species need special attention and which we can eat within reason.  A movement has come about in recent years to help educate consumers and fishermen about which species should not or should be fished or consumed. With this knowledge, families and business are able to make sustainable choices when they buy their fish.  They can chose to only purchase sustainable fish species that have been sustainably caught.

So what are sustainable fish? They are fish that are caught in a way that the vitality of the species and the environment is not being harmed in the long term.

There are two main factors which determine whether a fishery is sustainable: how healthy the population is and the method of catch. Some fishing methods such as bottom trawling, are very destructive as they plough up the ocean floor, others are indiscriminate and catch more than just the fish species they are targeting.

With fishing being the second largest industry in the Maldives after tourism, it is easy to see why overfishing has started to become a problem here. Fishing has always been a part of Maldivian culture, like President Maumoon Abdul Gayoom said: “Fishing is the lifeblood of our nation”, the problem only started to become bigger, as export and tourism started growing

The most unsustainable fish on the market in the Maldives today are Bluefin Tuna, Tropical prawns, Marlin, Sharks, Skates, Rays and Eels. To try to reduce the loss of species in the Maldives, certain laws surrounding catch and fishing techniques have been introduced to enable sustainable fishing. One is the pole and line method, which involves individuals catching tuna with a single line. Many young fishermen have taken up this technique as they have seen their stocks diminish and want to take sustainable action.  One of the most over fished species in the Maldives is Yellowfin Tuna, so by catching the tuna one-by-one, with a pole and line, the number of tuna caught is reduced and other marine life is not being harmed in the process.

The International Pole and Line Foundation (IPNLF) supports local communities in the Maldives. Due to the fisheries act of 1987, Maldivian tuna fisheries now follow the pole and line regulations. This fishery is hailed as the most successful MSC certified pole-and-line tuna fishery in the world. At Gili Lankanfushi, we also strive to eat only sustainably caught, sustainable species. We only accept Bonito Tuna, Dogtooth Tuna, White Tuna, Job Fish, Rainbow runner, Jack fish, Trevally, Mackerel, Emperor Fish, Wahoo, Red Snapper and Yellow Snapper from our local fishermen.

So how can you help? You can make a concerted effort to buy sustainable seafood which can be found on the Marine Stewardship Council certified products list, or simply ask for a certificate or proof of the fish you are buying’s origin. You can also spread the word about buying only sustainable fish to as many people as you can.

Just remember:  You have the right to ask your fish supplier or fish monger where your fish came from and how it was caught. If you are not completely satisfied with the answer, do not buy the fish!

PADI’s guest blogger Clare Baranowski introduces herself:

I am a marine zoologist from the UK who has worked throughout the tropics researching mega fauna and reef ecosystems in the Caribbean and Indian Ocean. I have experience monitoring and restoring coral and surveying manta, turtle and dolphin populations. I began my career as a science communicator before moving into research and management roles, this is why I incorporate outreach and education into every project I work on and I hope to continue this at Gili Lankanfushi.

Colonies of Hope

Blog written by guest blogger and marine biologist Clare Baranowski

Preserving coral reefs is a growing concern in the Maldives

At Gili Lankanfushi, we are recovering our coral reefs through the Coral lines Project. By growing small fragments of coral on hanging ropes (lines) and then transplanting them to our house reef near One Palm Island, we hope to see regeneration and aim to kick start the health of our house reef.

Our Coral Lines Project started three years ago and currently holds around 7484 coral colonies. We are consistently adding small fragments of coral to the already growing population on 153 lines.

Josie monitoring our 153 coral lines

The vulnerable nature of coral populations mean that they undergo cycles of disturbance and recovery. Our house reef was affected by warmer waters created by the El Nino event in 2016 which bleached much of the corals. Yet against all odds, most fragments in our coral lines nursery survived.  They have also been faced with a Crown of Thorns (coral predators) outbreak this year and have still remained intact.

In some cases, the corals in our lines are no longer present on shallow reefs in the area.

Now, is the perfect time to begin stage two of our coral restoration project by moving coral from our nursery to our house reef.  Transplanting coral is a delicate procedure with a lot of trial and error. We began slowly by creating a test site with a small number of coral colonies to ensure we would not lose healthy coral unnecessarily.

Josie beginning the process

We found a site with conditions not too dissimilar to the nursery. The area had to be flat and solid, with no loose material and space for growth.  It also had to be an area that is easily accessible for monitoring, but nowhere in danger of tampering or accidental damage.  We chose a depth of 8 metres in the middle of house reef drop off where we regularly snorkel. Another major concern was the Crown of Thorns Starfish, so we placed the coral in an area visited regularly by Harvey Edwards, Ocean Paradise Dive Centre manager, who has been removing these starfish from the reef for months.

Clare cutting the coral from the line

The next step was to cut the colonies from the lines in the nursery, and transport them in mesh bags in the water. We decided to use three different Acropora species to begin with as they are fast growing and like a lot of light and a moderate current. Once at the site, we cleaned the area of algae and attached the coral to ensure protection from extreme water movement. We placed them an equal distance apart to allow quick growth and attached the coral using epoxy, which is a clay like cement. We were aware from previous studies that Miliput (epoxy clay) has been seen to kill the part of the coral it is attaching, so we placed small amounts of putty at the base of the coral.

Once a week, for a total of six weeks, we will measure growth and survivorship of the coral.  We hope to replicate the test at different depths and locations to find a suitable site to start a larger restoration project. However, we will hold off on most of the major transplantation until after the monsoon season.

Attaching the colonies using epoxy

Due to the fragility of coral species, our rehabilitation plans are very flexible, and subject to a long monitoring period.  We expect to adapt our approach and long term management to ensure we keep up with the changing environment of the reef. Previous restoration plans have been hindered by external threats, so we are so excited to finally begin this project. We will be producing scientific data along the way which we hope will contribute to current coral reef rehabilitation knowledge.

Although our transplants are working well so far, we will still have many question to answer in the future such as: are the corals on the house reef still reproducing? As these corals survived the last bleaching, will they be more genetically suited to future hostile conditions? The answers to these questions are all just a work in progress and we will have to keep on watching and learning as we replant and monitor these corals over the next few years. As our house reef sustained a lot of mortality and the coral cover is low, we hope that this new project will help to rejuvenate the reef and raise awareness.

PADI’s guest blogger Clare Baranowski introduces herself:

I am a marine zoologist from the UK who has worked throughout the tropics researching mega fauna and reef ecosystems in the Caribbean and Indian Ocean. I have experience monitoring and restoring coral and surveying manta, turtle and dolphin populations. I began my career as a science communicator before moving into research and management roles, this is why I incorporate outreach and education into every project I work on and I hope to continue this at Gili Lankanfushi.

12 Activities to Keep Divers Active and Increase Business

Written by Megan Denny

Many people become divers because they’re curious about the underwater world. But often it’s the friendships and camaraderie that keep people diving, taking trips and furthering their dive education.

SI_Aug_KeepActiveCymnCCRMar12_0882

The social aspects of scuba are also key to growing and maintaining a successful dive business – divers sharing their passion for scuba with family and friends is what fuels our industry. Scuba marketing trends come and go, but there’s always been one constant: word of mouth. Divers invite friends, who make new friends and they all go diving.

Successful dive centers continually bring customers together through diving and nondiving activities. If you aren’t yet running events where divers and nondivers can mingle, choose an idea from the list below.

Family and Friends Discover Scuba® Diving Event

Host a friends and family Discover Scuba Diving (DSD®) event. Promote the event by emailing past student divers a free Discover Scuba Diving voucher, or creating a social media post for your event and inviting followers to tag or share with friends.

Here are some additional ideas to jump-start your dive center’s social calendar.

Diving Activities

  • Host a weekly or monthly fun dive followed by a picnic, BBQ or pizza party where kids and spouses are invited.
  • Challenge new divemasters to bring in two friends to do a DSD. The divemaster gains assisting experience and you may get two new divers.
  • If you have easy pool access, start a birthday party program for children or adults. Grown ups can have a private DSD experience for their friends, and kids can enjoy Bubblemaker®.
  • Start a women’s dive group with regular fun dives, DSDs, ReActivate® sessions, or a ladies’ weekend getaway.

SI_KeepActive_OW13_2203

Nondiving Activities

  • Each month (or quarter) celebrate all divers who earned a certification.
  • Invite VIP customers to a thank-you party and give them a pair of free DSD vouchers to share with friends.
  • Schedule a PADI Pro Night.
  • Host a travel night and ensure your most gregarious travelers attend.
  • Try a Dive Against Debris® event during the weekend, or at night during a full moon.
  • Celebrate the dive center’s birthday and staff milestones.
  • Start a year-end awards tradition (most accomplished, best sunburn, coolest critter photo, etc.).
  • Throw a shark-themed or Shark Week party.

Friends with Health Benefits

According to the Mayo Clinic, “Adults with strong social support have a reduced risk of many significant health problems, including depression, high blood pressure and an unhealthy body mass index (BMI). Studies have even found that older adults with a rich social life are likely to live longer than their peers with fewer connections.”

SI_Aug_KeepActive_Tribes0811_41

Help your customers strengthen their social bonds and find new dive buddies at shop-sponsored diving and nondiving events. When divers have friends to dive with, they dive more and that’s also good for the health of your business.

Marketing, ideas to help with your Dive business.

We all know there is a cost involved in advertising to new and none divers, but this is should be considered a fundamental on going running cost. We here at PADI we are reaching out to both new and established divers on your behalf on multiple platforms (online, in print, events and shows, TV etc. etc.) and of course we try and bring those inspired customers through your Centre’s door. It is great to hear so many people to asking to get their PADI, no matter whether that is a DSD to DM or beyond.

I have been hearing great things about the ongoing Get your PADI in the UK promotion we have been running on Facebook and the number of clicks to the micro site (https://dive.padi.com/EMEA_UK/english/) speak for themselves. The success of “Get your PADI” campaign has led to a further 57 being developed and we are reaching out in 6 languages in 14 Countries, with multiple regions within each.

The above was just one campaign and not cheap to do, what I am looking to do is share some ideas that you can implement. So I have done a few ideas to hopefully spark some ideas for you.

Landing Pages

These are important to understand what they are, you need to be able to do them quickly and easily. The general idea is that you will point people to these pages from any form of online marketing. You could have it as a Competition, e-mailing, Facebook ad, and newsletter. There needs to be a reason why someone will either sign up or give you their details and it needs to be easy for them to do it. Think about screen size on catchy text. There is no point paying for a campaign if that data is going to get lost of someone gives up the will to complete the process of filling it in.

Events

A couple of examples. PADI recently was a completely none diving Event for above water sports, we got our foot in the door at the national watersports festival. PADI then teamed up with a local dive centre to help run DSD’s and we then both spread the message of diving to everyone attending. As this was a National event I was pointing people to their nearest dive centre for when they return home. Another recent and month long event has seen PADI teaming up with the Aqua Lung to help promote learning to dive in a Drysuit to those Centres customers who had taken up the offer. As you are hopefully aware you can easily “bolt on” the Drysuit course to both the Openwater and Advanced Openwater Diver Courses. Those PADI Centre’s who took part ran a promotion for learning to dive or taking their Drysuit Course as a “Fusion” distinctive Speciality. It was great fun and meant I was at different sites over the various weekends. I am looking to do more of the same. 

But, what about taking part in a local event to yourself? Have you thought about summer fairs, corporate events, market or a creative car boot stall? It shouldn’t have to cost lots but it should look professional. Reaching out to none divers it is important to look like they will be safe in your hands. PADI has a budget to help with none dive show events and as a 5* Centre you can apply for a marketing support pack (packs are limited to a specified budget but you should get in touch with your Regional Manager regardless).

What about running a regular Project AWARE event and adopting a dive site?  https://www.projectaware.org/

Funding

You should look at ways and means to apply for funding. Funding can unlock the means to really do something special to help those that may not normally get to take part in our beautiful sport. I have been keen to follow what Herts Dive Club has been doing since they were awarded Lottery Funding

http://www.hertsdiveclub.co.uk/i-can-dive-a-lottery-funded-initiative/.

It really does pay to give back as there is a huge about of positive messaging that comes out of doing something that makes a difference.

Corporate

Have you reached out to your big local businesses? It is worth knowing that most companies will have a staff benefits scheme. If you are not on that list then why not. Let your regional manager know if you would like some help getting your foot in the door.

Youth Market

Don’t forget there is a huge promotion that PADI is doing with regards to helping your centre with the youth market. If you are not yet on the PADI approved youth training scheme please get in touch with the office.

If you would like more help with Marketing why not sign up for the PADI Business Academy?

The Business of Women in Diving

Written by Megan Denny

The average entry-level diver is 27-30 years old, college educated, and male (60 percent are male). For many years the gender ratio of 65 percent male versus 35 percent female remained constant. However, there’s been a shift in the past five years and women now make up 40 percent of new divers. That’s good progress, but the pool of potential women divers is still massive.

An average female consumer is an ideal scuba diving customer. The numbers don’t lie.

Major companies, such as Nike and the PGA (Professional Golfers Association) are taking statistics like these to heart. After Nike chose to focus on women, sales jumped 20 percent and Nike expects revenue from women’s apparel more than double in five years. The PGA recently launched a campaign to increase women’s participation in golf – an industry that is in decline. Only 19 percent of all golfers are women, and PGA research shows, “there are millions of women who want to participate in golf, but they don’t feel welcome. They haven’t been invited.”

Make Women Feel Welcome

Many of the things that make your business female-friendly are just plain smart business practices including:

  • Offer PADI eLearning® – Working women and those trying to balance family commitments will appreciate this flexible, go-at-your-own-pace option.
  • Keep it clean – Many people, not just women, think negatively about a business with a dingy bathroom or changing room. If you’d think twice about showing your mother your facilities, it’s time to spruce up the place.
  • Invite them back – Get in touch with women who’ve dropped out of scuba diving and invite them back by promoting ReActivate®.
  • Stock women’s gear – Having dive gear and other products designed for women available is welcoming.

LadyGearPool_0716_01sml

One of the most effective ways to bring in new female divers is by asking current customers to invite other women to try diving. Be upfront: let them know you’re trying to change the perception that scuba is for old guys. Ask what you could do to bring in more women and offer an incentive. The results will pay off.

“Camaraderie keeps women diving, buying gear, taking trips,” says Chelsea Cameron, Sales and Marketing Manager for The Diving Locker in Vancouver, Canada. “There’s one group of ladies at our store that went to Cozumel together and they‘re like the three amigas. They’ve been doing courses together, they all bought dry suits together and they egg each other on.”

Female Staff and Instructors are Essential

“Having female staff helps to draw in more female divers. They feel more comfortable when they see other women in the sport. Especially when fitting gear, there are things guys don’t think of, especially with getting into wetsuits,” says Cameron.

Virginia Watson, Marketing Manager at Dive Otago, New Zealand echoes this sentiment. Having a mix of male and female instructors enables us to provide good role models for female divers that are just beginning in their dive career. They see that even in our harsher conditions, women are more than capable of diving day in day out.”

ShawsCove_0415_0980

Women make up at least half the staff at both Dive Otago and The Diving Locker and research proves this is a smart idea for any business.

  • An economist from Carnegie Mellon found teams with at least one female member had a collectively higher IQ than male-only teams.
  • When Fortune 500 companies had at least three female directors, the return on capital, sales and return on equity increased by 40 percent or more.
  • Studies from a variety of industries found that having a larger number of women on a team accounts for greater psychological safety, team confidence, group experimentation and team efficiency.

Source themuse.com

Greg Kocher owner and president of The Diving Locker notes, “I’ve been in business for 50 years and I’ve always tried to promote scuba to different age groups and demographics. I have eight full time employees and half of them are women. It’s proven to be a good model. I’ve been in business so long because of the exceptional staff.”

At Broadreach, a youth educational adventure company, 75 percent of headquarters employees are women and 62 percent of their dive staff are female. “Having so many women in leadership and instructor roles makes us a very adaptable company, as we’re all coming to the table with different points of view. It makes us better problem solvers and communicators, plus it gives us stronger collaborative spirit,” says Creative Director Ladye Jane Vickers.

Kate Farthing, Director of Field Operations at Broadreach adds, “Our programs have attracted more female students each year, and having females working in the industry is often encouraging to parents trying to support their young women as they reach for their goals. The ability to understand, support and encourage our female students is really rewarding and I think sits well with our clients.

“Female dive staff, for lack of a better way to put this, can help ease the concerns of female participants in ways that male instructors have a harder time with. Getting in and out of wetsuits, lugging gear around, what do I do if I’m on my period…all of these things are so naturally facilitated by female dive instructors (not to say that guys aren’t able) but it’s important to have both so all students feel comfortable sharing their concerns and finding solutions.”

Marketing to Women

Virginia Watson from Dive Otago shared this tip: “Championing female divers on Facebook is an awesome way to boost enrollment numbers organically. When we are actively looking to increase female numbers through paid advertising we specifically target that demographic and use images of inspiring female divers. People need to identify themselves in the imagery so including photos of woman in all areas of your marketing should also help… it might inadvertently pull in more males too!”
Check out: 7 Women in Diving Everyone Should Know or female PADI AmbassaDiver™

Photo courtesy of Dive-Otago-2

Photo courtesy of Dive Otago

The Family Factor

Roughly half of women of childbearing age are mothers, and some PADI® Dive Centers have found success partnering with a child-care service or hiring a babysitter. This helps mom take a breather (off a regulator) while she does a scuba review, and gives parents a chance to enjoy time together as a couple.

Another popular way to attract mothers and families is by offering kids scuba programs and selling products that cater to divers with children. “We run a week-long scuba camp for kids 10-15 years old four times during the summer. Predominantly, three women teach the camp, and they enjoy doing it. But all of our staff are involved in teaching, selling, and running weekend trips,” says Kocher of The Dive Locker.

Broadreach Dive Instructor Hannah Tannenbaum shared her thoughts on the benefits of scuba for girls and young women, “Diving is empowering because it’s an entirely new realm in which social pressures and appearance don’t matter. All that matters is your safety, awareness, and immense humility in acknowledging we are such a small piece of this wide and beautiful world, and that our stresses and day-to-day problems don’t matter as much in the face of a sea turtle. I love teaching young women to dive and seeing them develop a new sense of self and gratitude for their world which diving opens.”

Build a Community

A study from Indiana University on exercise habits found that people with a regular gym buddy experienced only a 6.3 percent dropout rate after twelve months compared to a 43 percent dropout rate for people who worked out alone. Help female divers stay active by starting a “Diva Dive Club,” or a PADI Pro mentorship program.

CUR06_1784_Women

Kate Farthing from Broadreach notes, “The mere presence of our female staff offers such a great vision of the future to our students. They know being a dive professional isn’t such a far off goal.  Many of our dive instructors began as Broadreach students in middle school and worked their way to being instructors by the age of 18. Our students really build lore around the instructors who have been around Broadreach since they started diving and think they are the coolest of the cool. It’s an easy thing to aspire to.”

Nondiving events (beach parties, bar nights, clean-up events, etc.) can help divers – male or female – connect with new dive buddies. Encourage customers to invite female friends who are curious about diving, but aren’t ready to sign up for a class. Scuba diving can seem intimidating, but meeting fun and supportive divers can quickly shatter that perception.

If you’re interested in bringing more women into diving, use PADI Women’s Dive Day on 15 July as a kickoff event. Dive Otago plans to offer free Discover Scuba® Diving sessions, high tea and tutus. Broadreach has numerous Women’s Dive Day activities planned including a thank you celebration for their female staff and live-streamed dives.

Get started at the PADI Pros’ Site Women in Diving page

DFD_WDD

Trying something new can be intimidating – for potential female divers and business owners. But when more women dive, it’s a win-win. Here are some parting words from Chelsea Cameron at The Dive Locker, When you’re out on a dive with more female divers it’s more low pressure, people are more comfortable sharing stories. Having more women is great for the shop the atmosphere. We enjoy it a lot, we have fun, we keep the guys in check.”

2017 PADI Women’s Dive Day Global Video Contest

Share a video of your PADI Women’s Dive Day event with us and be entered to win a FREE 2018 PADI Membership Renewal.

The PADI Marketing Team is looking for amazing video footage showcasing the spirit of Women’s Dive Day for inclusion in the 2018 event promotional video.

The contest is open to PADI Dive Centers, Resorts and Individual Members worldwide who are hosting a 2017 PADI Women’s Dive Day event.

How to Enter

  1. First things first! If you haven’t already, be sure to register your PADI Women’s Dive Day event. Learn more here.
  2. Grab your underwater camera and take video throughout your event. Whether your event is training in the pool, diving a lake or exploring the open ocean, show how you and your divers are celebrating the spirit and comradery of Women’s Dive Day. A few things to keep in mind:
    • While the primary objective is to promote women in diving, the footage can certainly show all participants regardless of age or gender. After all, the foundation of Women’s Dive Day is to reinforce the understanding that diving is open and enjoyable to everyone.
    • PADI standards should be adhered to and reflected in the footage.
    • Footage that shows any touching or damaging of marine life will not be considered.
    • Be sure to get signed releases from people that are shown in your video footage and photos. Download a sample release here.
  3. Edit your video so that it is between two and five minutes in length. Video should be a minimum 1080p.
  4. Submit your entry to jennifer.small@padi.com, including entrant’s name, PADI Member/Store Number and contact information. Videos must be sent using a file sharing service such as We Transfer or Dropbox. High resolution photos (minimum 1000 pixels) and/or event description and quotes are welcomed, but a video must be submitted to be considered for the prize.
  5. Check your email to see if your video was selected as one of the winners. If so, you will receive one-year 2018 Membership Renewal free and a set of goodie bags for your 2018 Women’s Dive Day event.

Click here to see Official Rules

For inspiration, watch the 2017 PADI Women’s Dive Day video:

Thank you for taking part in PADI Women’s Dive Day 2017 and the Global Video Contest! For more information about PADI Women’s Dive Day, visit padi.com/women-dive.

PADI Continuing Education – Specialty Courses

Since you started diving, I´m sure you heard your Instructor saying, at least once a day, that it is important to continue your education. I´m sure you did – otherwise you would not have become a PADI Professional… But what is Continuing Education and why is it so important for yourself and the diving Industry in general? If you are familiar with the PADI system, you should know and understand that the continuing Education is the backbone of the PADI System.

 

 

Are you already a Specialty Instructor?

The Power of Continuing Education (CON-ED)

The power of the PADI system of diver education is its diversity in courses

  • From entry level all the way up to professional
  • All are standardized
  • Aim is to improve specific skills
  • Specialization improves the market value
  • Enough choices for everybody

It adds variety in teaching… Which means that you are not only stuck with the core course like the PADI Open Water Course, the PADI Advanced Open Water course or the PADI Rescue course. It connects in the same time to the interest of the student and improves the skills and therefore the safety of the divers.

Specialty courses can create different tracks to follow; For example it can add-on sales of diving equipment, or it will open a road to the PADI Master Scuba Diver certification.

It is essential that an Instructor in these days can offer various Specialty courses.

How many Specialty Certifications do you have?

What if I tell you that Specialties are the reason to become very successful in the diving industry? The more specialties you can teach and the more languages you can bring into a new position for a Dive Center – the more valuable you will become in the whole industry.

I can only highly recommend that you follow the Specialty Instructor Training! It will certainly build up your confidence and it will give you new insights. The more specialties you offer, the bigger your income can grow!

 

It shows to the Dive Center owner and to PADI that you understand the PADI philosophy – and together with the new Elite Instructor program – it will also be recognized by PADI.

How can you apply to become a PADI Specialty Instructor?

There are two ways to obtain the Specialty ratings:

  • The first is completing a PADI Specialty Instructor course with a PADI Course Director. This reduced the number of dives you must have – 10 versus 20 – showing experience in the specialty area.
  • If you already have the experience (min. 20 logged dives), you can apply directly to your PADI Regional Headquarters. You will find on the PADI Prosite the Specialty Instructor Application.

To summarize – If you offer a variety of courses – this will have a direct impact in your Dive Center.

Why?

Specialty certifications have a direct impact on equipment sales, because the courses are creating a demand for new equipment and it also triggers the lust for more adventure. At the end of the day you will have more satisfied customers and happier staff.

To push the PADI Continuing Education courses is the foundation for success! Because your Customers are always aiming for new experiences and challenges.

Check out the newest challenges for 2017

PADI Elite Instructor

2017 – MSD My PADI Challenge