How to Be an Effective Assistant in Confined Water

Certified assistants play an important role in confined water sessions. During this transformative time, students try things they’ve never done before, overcome fears, and achieve mastery. A certified assistant aids both the instructor and students acting as a partner and a second set of eyes.

We interviewed PADI Course Directors who have overseen the training of hundreds of divers and dive professionals. Their consensus: communication, preparation, and a thorough knowledge of the course material are the keys to being an effective assistant in confined water.

Good Communication

A good team can’t function well without good communication. It’s important to meet or message with the instructor prior to class to discuss skill sequencing, equipment needs, and any struggles students may be experiencing.

“It’s important to be proactive,” said PADI Course Director Kevin O’Brien from VIP Diving. “Talk to the instructor about where will you be positioned for each skill, and whether you will demonstrate.”

Course Preparation

Anticipate equipment needs such as extra cylinders, weights for buoyancy skills, pocket masks for rescue scenarios, etc. Review performance requirements in the PADI Instructor Manual, and the list of common student problems in PADI’s Guide to Teaching. Jot down notes on the course slates.

“Make sure your gear is in good shape and working properly. A dive professional who has gear that doesn’t fit or work properly sets a bad example for student divers and wastes class time,” advised O’Brien.

Certified assistants are sometimes called upon to work one-on-one with a student. In this instance, a good assistant will refer to their course slates to ensure the student can meet all the performance requirements before sending the student back to the instructor for evaluation.

Skill Demonstration

PADI Course Director Pepe Mastropaolo from Buddy Dive Academy emphasized the importance of using a slow, controlled manner when demonstrating skills. “A good assistant also positions themselves so students can see these actions clearly,” he noted.

Appropriate Level of Supervision

Use a different approach with new versus certified divers. For example:

– In the Open Water Diver course®, the assistant should be close-in and ready to take hold of a student who loses control of their buoyancy.

– During the Peak Performance Buoyancy Specialty course, the assistant can give students more space and time to fine tune their buoyancy skills.

Be Approachable and Handle Issues Professionally

“It is no secret that many student divers feel more comfortable approaching the certified assistant than the Instructor. Having a friendly conduit between the student and the instructor makes student learning easier and enhances teamwork,” said Mastropaolo.

Open a dialogue by speaking to each student after class. Ask what they learned today, or just, “how was it?” If a student expresses a concern, be sure to communicate it to the instructor at the appropriate time. Work as a team and avoid making executive decisions.

“Never contradict the instructor or disparage your dive shop in front of student divers,” said O’Brien. “If you have an issue or disagreement, take it offline with the instructor in private for clarification.”

 

For additional tips on working as a PADI Divemaster, or how to find that dream job, visit the Divemaster section of the PADI Pros Europe blog and follow PADI Pros Europe on Facebook.

How you as a Divemaster can encourage more women into the world of diving

 

 

July 21, 2018 marks the fourth annual PADI Women’s Dive Day. With hundreds of events hosted by PADI Dive Centres and Resorts around the world, divers will join together to celebrate female divers, aiming to encourage more women to take up the sport. 

 As a PADI Divemaster you can help encourage more women to take the plunge and sign up for a scuba diving course. Here are 5 top tips how to inspire and empower others to enjoy diving as much as you do!

  •  Promote PADI eLearning

PADI eLearning provides a flexible learning option that enables women and men alike to easily fit dive theory around work and family commitments. Learning to dive has never been more convenient!

  • Promote ReActivate

As a PADI Divemaster you can conduct the ReActivate™ program for certified divers. With that in mind get in touch with women who have dropped out of diving and invite them back to ReActivate.

  • Promote scuba diving lessons for kids

Having more female divers generally increases the number of families diving, which helps create a stronger and more active dive community. As a PADI Divemaster you can further attract mothers and families into diving by promoting kids scuba programs, such as PADI Bubblemaker, PADI SealTeam and PADI Junior Open Water Diver. Learning to dive will help the soon to be female divers relax from the stresses of daily life and keep the kids active at the same time!

  • Organise non-diving events

Non-diving events (for example, beach clean ups, hosting fundraising events for Project AWARE) can help divers and non-divers alike connect with the dive community. As a PADI Divemaster you can encourage your customers to invite female friends who are curious about diving, so they can network with scuba enthusiasts and get a flavour of what extraordinary experiences lie ahead of them on their scuba journey.

  • Stock women’s dive gear

Encourage your dive centre to stock up on female and children’s dive equipment. When walking into a dive centre for possibly the first time, people need to be able to identify themselves in imagery, so including bright and vibrant photos of women diving in your marketing materials should help inspire more female divers.

 

Don’t forget to register your event on the PADI Women’s Dive Day event locator so divers can easily find information and make plans to take part. It’s easy! All PADI Members (dive shops and individual pros) can simply enter the details here and your event will show when a diver looks for Women’s Dive Day events near them.

PADI Divemasters, we are reaching out to you to help us spread the word! By implementing one of our top tips you can help to encourage more women into the world of diving!

 

 

 

 

 

PADI Divemasters, Lend your Voice to Marine Conservation!

Dive against Debris

Dive against Debris

PADI Divemasters have the power to be the world’s most passionate advocates for marine conservation. With your unique underwater access and dive skills, you are a powerful movement – one that can seek out action and mobilise change for the better! So, with that in mind, here are 5 tips how you can lend your voice to promote marine conservation efforts.

 

  1. As a mentor to divers the focus of your dives should be on the education and understanding of local marine life you are hoping to see. PADI Divemasters supervise both training and non-training related activities by planning, organising and directing dives. You can use these attributes to empower divers to become ocean stewards in several ways, such as:

 

  1. You can partake in the development of environmental education and awareness programs! As a PADI Divemaster you can teach the Coral Reef Conservation and Project AWARE Specialist course on completion of the following: 1) the “Learning, Instruction and the PADI System” presentation from the Assistant Instructor Course. 2) a PADI Speciality Instructor Course taught by a qualified PADI Speciality Instructor Trainer. Make sure you ask your students to choose a Project AWARE version of their PADI certification card to support a clean and healthy ocean!

 

  1. Strengthen your ongoing commitment to global marine conservation activities by working for, or continuing your dive education with, a 100% AWARE partner. Across the world, PADI dive centres have committed to ocean protection through the 100% AWARE partnership. 100% AWARE partners support a healthy ocean by making a donation to Project AWARE on behalf of each student that they certify. Visit the 100% AWARE Dive Partner Map to locate a 100% AWARE dive centre or instructor.

 

  1. Inspire year-round action to remove, report and prevent underwater debris by organising Dive against Debris clean up actions. Check out the Dive Against Debris Event Organizer Kit to download helpful tools to recruit and organise your volunteers. The data collected helps influence policies and drive change needed to stop trash from reaching the ocean in the first place. Don’t forget to encourage your volunteers to upload their findings on the Dive Against Debris™ Interactive Map to further highlight the quantity and type of marine debris littering our seas.

 

  1. Spread the word about the importance of ocean conservation! One person can make a difference, but think how much greater an impact you’ll have if you recruit fellow divers to the cause!

So, what are you waiting for? Lend your support and your voice by becoming an active advocate for ocean conservation!

How to Get the Divemaster Job of Your Dreams (Part 2)

Putting yourself in the Winning Seat

Your PADI Divemaster certification can open the door to a fun and rewarding career anywhere in the world, but landing a great job takes work. Last month, in Part 1, we highlighted different skills you can add to your CV to help you stand out from the crowd and put you in the winning seat.  Below are some more strategies to help you outmaneuver the competition and snatch up your dream job.

How Will You Bring in New Customers?
New customers are the key to the success for any business, and dive operations are no exception. If you have personal connections or new ideas to help the dive shop owner bring more people through their doors, you’ll have a leg up on other job applicants. Here are a few ideas to consider:

– Build relationships with the concierge at local hotels
– Suggest ways to bring lapsed divers back into the shop with PADI ReActivate™
(a program DMs can conduct)
– Pitch a kids scuba summer camp program

– Do outreach to local businesses who might want EFR training
(you can even become an EFR Instructor)

Take Advantage of Online Tools

Visit the employment board on the PADI Pros Site to learn what skills employers are looking for and how you stack up to other PADI Divemasters looking for work.

Promote your skills and passion for diving on Facebook, LinkedIn and other social media channels. Take time to learn how using social media can boost your scuba career.

Every Day is a Job Interview
The dive industry is small, and developing a bad reputation can quickly bring your scuba career to a halt. The diver next to you could be friends with a shop owner, and the server at a restaurant might work part-time on a dive boat. Always present yourself as a professional, trustworthy person online and in real life.

Your appearance can be an important factor in getting hired. Imagine two job applicants with equal qualifications: one who looks like they just washed up on shore and another who has clearly put time and effort into maintaining their hair and clothes – who do you think gets the job?

It’s also important to maintain physical fitness. A dive operation entrusts Divemasters with the safety of their customers. Do you have the strength to help someone back onto a boat? Could you egress someone during a shore dive?

Once you land that Divemaster dream job, act professionally and follow through on what you agreed to during your interview. If the job doesn’t work out, give as much notice as possible.

We hope the tips above help you take advantage of new opportunities in the New Year! For a list of dive operators looking to hire PADI Divemasters, visit the PADI Pros’ Site and choose Employment/Classifieds from the Online Services dropdown menu.

The 13 Different Types of Divemasters

A PADI Divemaster wears many hats: gear-wrangler, underwater guide, photographer, and sometimes even counselor. Over time, each divemaster develops a personal style, specializing in their own interests be it fish identification, or perhaps local history. Below are a few types of divemasters you may encounter:

The Comedian

The Comedian – The comedian divemaster delivers a dive briefing full of one-liners with the timing of a standup comic. The jokes aren’t always funny, but what they lack in quality, they make up for in quantity.

The Navigator – Even when visibility is so bad you can’t see your own fins, The Navigator somehow manages to bring the group back within a few meters of the exit point. At dive sites with a near-featureless bottom, The Navigator always finds the rocky outcropping full of life in a literal sea of nothingness.

The Prankster – If you’ve ever found yourself mobbed by fish only to discover someone put a cheese sandwich in your BC pocket – you’ve met the prankster DM. Other signature moves include Kool-Aid powder in the dive bootie and talc powder handprints in inappropriate places.

The scout

The Scout – The Scout was a shark in previous life. This divemaster can spot the faintest flicker of a big animal in the blue, and ably steers your dive group away from herds of others.

The Documentarian – The Documentarian divemaster has one eye on the group and the other behind the camera. This type of divemaster ensures every guest has a photo or video to post on social media after the dive, and challenges the Fish Whisperer as the most popular type of DM.

The Fish Whisperer – When The Fish Whisperer divemaster is around, all the bucket list animals come out to say hello. This type of DM can coax an eel out of its hole, speak fluent whale, and get their teeth cleaned by shrimp.

The Storyteller

The Storyteller – A Storyteller DM knows the backstory of every shipwreck, and the origins of every dive site name. Their stories are so entertaining, you won’t want to know whether they’re true or not.

The Most Fascinating  Divemaster in the Ocean –  The Most Fascinating DM has “been there, dove that.” This DM learned to dive before boats were invented, and Conservation International insisted they start a digital logbook to preserve the world’s forests. This DM was there when Bikini Atoll was a one-piece and once met a Cousteau.

The Cat Herder – You’re always in good hands when diving with The Cat Herder. These DMs have developed an eerie prescience: able to predict when a diver is going to or chase a fish into the depths, or linger too long photographing a coral head. The Cat Herder is always ready to wake a diver from their trance and bring them safely back to the group.

The Medic

The Medic – Whether you have an earache, a scrape or a stingy spot, The Medic divemaster is always prepared with a kind word and something to soothe the pain.

The Critter Nerd – A Critter Nerd knows the difference between a nudibranch and a flat worm and can identify their favorite marine gastropod mollusk – in Latin. They’re typically good friends with The Fish Whisperer who helps unite the nerd with the nembrotha lineolata.

The Mechanic – The Q of kit, the MacGyver of maritime activities, The Mechanic once made a rebreather from an old microwave and some surgical tubing. Whenever The Mechanic is around, no one misses a dive due to a gear problem.

The Concierge – More valuable above water than below, The Concierge knows the best place to fuel up before a morning dive, or unwind after a long day at the beach.

 

If you’re a PADI Divemaster looking to develop your personal style or discover your savant skill, enroll in a continuing education course such as:

PADI Fish Identification or Underwater Naturalist
Digital Underwater Photographer
Equipment Specialist (or a manufacturer’s equipment repair course)
DAN First Aid for Hazardous Marine Life Injuries

How to Get the Divemaster Job of Your Dreams (Part 1)

Your PADI Divemaster certification can open the door to a fun and rewarding career anywhere in the world, but landing a great job takes work. You can’t be like a sea anemone and wait for the perfect job to drift by. Use the strategies below to outmaneuver the competition and snatch up your dream job.

Do You Have the Skills Employers Expect?
For the most part, business owners would rather hire someone with experience rather than train a newbie. Review the list below to ensure when a potential employer asks if you have experience filling tanks, working on a boat, etc. – you can answer yes!

  • DSD Leader credential – By completing the PADI Discover Scuba Diving Leader internship, a Divemaster can conduct PADI Discover Scuba® (DSD) programs in a pool or confined water. This skill makes you a valuable asset to any dive operation and, because it is an optional part of the Divemaster course, gives you an advantage over other job applicants.
  • Boat Basics – PADI Divemasters, especially those hoping to work in resort areas, need to know their way around a boat. Familiarize yourself with boat terminology, local laws, and make sure you remember those knot tying skills. If you don’t have a lot of boat diving knowledge, consider taking the PADI Boat Diver Speciality course.
  • Minor Equipment Repairs – Divemasters spend a lot of time helping divers with their gear. If you don’t know how to handle minor gear issues, enroll in the PADI Equipment Specialist course and/or purchase the PADI Equipment Specialist Touch
  • Emergency Oxygen Administration – Every dive leader should be familiar with how to administer oxygen in the event of a diving emergency. Most dive operations will expect you to have this skill – in addition to current first aid and CPR training.  Learn more about the PADI Emergency Oxygen Provider Specialty. If you already have this certification, talk to a PADI Course Director about getting trained to teach this course.
  • Ability to Fill Tanks – The ability to fill scuba tanks is an essential skill for Divemasters. To distinguish yourself from other candidates, you may want to get a visual cylinder inspection certification.

What Makes You Better Than the Rest?
Why are you the best candidate for a Divemaster job? What can you do better than anyone else? If you don’t have an answer to these questions, consider picking up one of the specialised skills below:

  1. Boat Skills – Resort and liveaboard operators need staff members who can do more than just lead dives. If you can drive a skiff, have a boat handling certification, know basic boat engine or compressor maintenance, or have a captain’s license, you will be twice as valuable as a Divemaster who does not have these skills.
  2. Equipment Service Technician –  Enroll in manufacturer-sponsored courses such as regulator repair, BCD maintenance and repair, etc. Though you may find yourself at a workbench more often than a dive boat, this can be your foot in the door.
  3. Know Your Local Marine Life – Most Divemasters have a good (but not great) knowledge of local marine life. By learning about the behaviors and habitats of your local critters, you’ll be able to help divers get more from their dive experience (and hopefully show their gratitude in tips). PADI’s Fish ID and Underwater Naturalist Specialty courses are a good place to start.
  4. Photo/Video Expertise – Capturing great images of marine life and divers having fun is a huge asset to any dive business. Photos and video are an essential part of any businesses’ marketing strategy, yet many dive operators don’t have time to get them. Divemasters can also teach the PADI Digital Underwater Photographer Specialty Course (under the direction of a PADI Instructor) after receiving training from a PADI Course Director.
  5. Adaptive Techniques – PADI Divemasters can become a certified PADI Adaptive Techniques Support Diver (English only) and learn techniques to apply when training and diving with physically and mentally challenged divers.

Retail Recommendations – A Divemaster looking for work in a non-resort location should learn everything they can about the major manufacturer’s product lines. Knowing the features and benefits of popular BCDs, regulators and computers makes you a valuable employee to retailers.

Resorts – Divemasters looking for work in resort areas should be familiar with local places to eat, drink and have fun – easy right? Another thing DM’s should know is how to drive a large passenger van. Many dive operators in resort areas have a 15+ passenger van to pick up guests at their hotel(s) and to shuttle divers to/from the dive boat. Check local licensing requirements, some areas require a special driver’s license endorsement.

Knowing more than one language is also advantageous for Divemasters working in resort areas. The “best” second language to learn will depend on the area. Visit the Employment Board area of the PADI Pros Site to learn which languages are in demand.

Check in next month for Part 2 and find out about those extras that can put you in the winning seat.

New Year New Career: Becoming a PADI Instructor

InstructorAre you bored of the office? Do you dream of every diving holiday being more than just a holiday? Is it time to start doing what you really love?

Becoming a PADI Instructor not only means a new career, it can lead to a life of travel, adventure and so much more. To find out more about what’s involved and how to get started, read on!

What is the IDC?

IDC stands for Instructor Development Course and it is made up of two parts; Assistant Instructor and Open Water Scuba Instructor. Most candidates take both sections together followed by sitting a PADI® Instructor Exam to become fully-fledged PADI Instructors.

If you are already a certified diving instructor with another training organisation you may not need to complete the Assistant Instructor portion but rather go directly into the Open Water Scuba Instructor course.

InstructorWho can take an IDC?

You need to be a PADI certified Divemaster who has been a certified diver for at least 6 months and meets the following requirements;

Who will teach my IDC?

IDC’s are taught by PADI Course Directors – the highest level of Instructor rating – so you will be in safe hands. PADI Course Directors all started out as PADI Instructors so not only do they teach IDCs, they have been through one themselves. Your Course Director may also be assisted by IDC Staff Instructors and Master Scuba Instructors who are all there to help you and ensure your success.

Is it the right career choice for me?

If you like people, love diving, have a passion for travel and a thirst for adventure then YES!

Becoming a PADI Instructor not only allows you to teach diving and share your passion, it enables you to make real differences to people’s lives.

You’ll teach nervous beginners and give them confidence, you’ll teach teenagers and show them the value of responsibility, you’ll dive with people of all nationalities and ages, from all walks of life and you’ll give them one common gift – the gift of diving and a passion for the underwater world.

For most active divers, diving is more than a holiday activity, it’s a passion and, for many, a way of life. You’ll be giving this gift to each and every one of your students. Think back to your own recreational scuba diving instructors – they must have been inspiring for you to be thinking about following in their footsteps!

PADI Open Water Scuba Instructors are the most sought after dive professionals in the industry and your Instructor certification is your ticket to adventure. You’ll be able to apply for jobs in your own neighbourhood or on the other side of the planet – the world really will be your oyster.

What will I learn during the IDC?

The IDC teaches you how to conduct all core PADI Courses from Open Water Diver through to Divemaster. You’ll learn the PADI Standards and Procedures and how to find information you need in the PADI Instructor Manual. You’ll also review:

  • PADI Learning®, Instruction and the PADI System
  • Risk Management and Diver Safety
  • The Business of Diving and your role as an instructor
  • Marketing Diving and Sales Counseling

In addition to studying these key topics you’ll be reviewing your in-water skill demonstrations and learning how to deliver clear presentations for Confined Water and Open Water dives as well as for Knowledge Development presentations. Your public speaking skills will improve, your confidence will grow and your in-water skills will become perfectly honed.

Instructor

What about the Instructor Exam?

The Instructor Exams are your chance to shine and show the examiners everything you have learned during the IDC. After the IDC your Course Director will confirm that you are ready for the exams so it’s just a matter of staying calm and remembering that you know everything, relaxing and enjoying the experience.

Is there anything else I need to know?

Yes, the IDC is not just a learning experience. You’ll develop a relationship with your Course Director and in many cases they are able to assist in helping you to find employment and providing references.

You’ll also make friends for life with your fellow candidates as you take this leap into a new career and new life together. It’s an experience you won’t forget – and it’s just the beginning.

Sign me up!

If you are ready to start learning straight away why not sign up for IDC online, PADI’s eLearning option and complete your study from home at your own pace? You’ll complete 9 interactive knowledge development sections which will save you classroom time later and help to build your confidence.

Use the PADI Dive Store Locator to find IDC Centres in your chosen area and get in contact with them to find one that suits your needs.

Top tips

  • Consider if you need accommodation and ask if it is included in the price or if the dive centre can help you to find accommodation to suit your budget. In many areas some places to stay will offer cheaper rates if you are staying long term.
  • Ask about possible teaching internships after you have completed your course.
  • Ask if the dive centre or Course Director offer any assistance with job placement after certification.
  • Start looking at the PADI Pros employment board on com to look for jobs coming up in the future.
  • Download the PADI Instructor Examinations schedule from com.
  • Get in the pool and start refreshing yourself on your demonstration quality skills.
  • Get ready for an extraordinary life!

5 Ways Becoming a PADI Dive Instructor Benefits You in the Real World

There’s a lot more to being a PADI Instructor than being a great diver (but of course that helps). A good instructor is also: an engaging public speaker, someone who can anticipate a student’s needs, and someone who can break down complicated topics into easy-to-understand chunks.

These skills, learned in the PADI Instructor Development Course (IDC), are also incredibly helpful in the real world. Instructor candidates tell us frequently how PADI instructor training improved their ability to communicate ideas, bolstered their confidence in public speaking, and taught them how to give constructive criticism to others. For example: at the PADI Office, it’s not uncommon for staff members to (half-jokingly) use an IDC technique to enforce office etiquette:

“I really liked the way you – keep the break room clean. However, I noticed someone forgot to – make more coffee when the pot is empty. Remember, it’s important to keep your co-workers caffeinated.”

While some people are natural instructors, many people begin their PADI Instructor course wondering, “how on earth am I going to teach someone how to breathe underwater?” That’s where a PADI Course Director gets to work his or her magic. Using the PADI system of education, instructor candidates learn how to organize and present information, conduct skill development sessions, and manage open water dive training. By the end of the IDC, instructor candidates walk away with a noggin full of knowledge and the ability to confidently explain and present information.

In addition to improving your public speaking and in-water skills, the IDC is a great way to network with interesting people. Divers who go through a Divemaster or IDC course learn a lot about each other, grow together, and form a special bond.

If you’re dissatisfied with your current job, becoming a PADI Instructor will level-up key job skills and open new doors. PADI Dive Instructors are the most sought after scuba professionals in the world. Once you’re a PADI Pro, a quick look at the job board on the PADI Pros Site pulls up jobs in dozens of countries.

Even if being a full-time scuba instructor isn’t your cup of tea, working part-time as an instructor or dive guide is a great way to supplement other freelance work close to home or in a tropical paradise. You may also be able to earn college credit. Last, but certainly not least, being a PADI Pro and transforming the lives of others is extremely rewarding.

Learn more about becoming a dive instructor, or peruse some of the scuba diving careers available to PADI Pros. Or, contact your local PADI Dive Center or Resort to enroll in an upcoming Divemaster or IDC course.

PADI Divemaster Teaching Opportunities Expanded

As an Active status PADI Divemaster, you will be able to find work all over the world in an endless supply of exciting locations. World-class house reefs become your office and not just another desktop screen saver. The world is your oyster! Where will your adventure as a PADI Divemaster take you?

What you can do as an authorised PADI Divemaster:

  • Supervise training and non-training related diving activities
  • Conduct dive briefings, scuba reviews, PADI ReActivate and skin diver course
  • Assist in Discover Scuba Diving programs and lead additional dives
  • Lead Discover Local Diving programs
  • Teach these specialty courses without dives:
    • Equipment Specialist
    • Coral Reef Conservation
    • Project AWARE Specialist
    • PADI Distinctive Specialty Diver courses that don’t include dives
    • Digital Underwater Photographer
    • Emergency Oxygen Provider

Take a look at the Third Quarter 2017 Training Bulletin to find out how to qualify to teach these specialty courses. Stand out from the crowd and expand your PADI Divemaster teaching opportunities…who knows where your next PADI Pro Adventure will take you!

 

 

Living the Divemaster Life – Birgitta Mueck

Born and raised on the island of Orust, on the west coast of Sweden, Birgitta Mueck’s love and curiosity for the wilderness led her to become an underwater camera operator, guide, PADI Divemaster and PADI AmbassaDiver. 

Picture Credit: Nanna Mueck

We caught up with Birgitta to find out more about her adventures as a                   PADI Divemaster !  


When did you know that you wanted to become a PADI Divemaster?

The idea of becoming a PADI Divemaster is something that slowly and steadily grew with me. Whilst working as an underwater camera operator, we produced films to help promote interest and understanding for life hidden beneath the waves. Becoming a PADI Divemaster felt like a great opportunity to be able to share these wonderful experiences as-well as my love and admiration for the ocean with others. Not much beats the feeling of sharing amazing experiences – it inspires, spreads smiles, creates friendships and gives unforgettable moments.

When and where did you become a PADI Divemaster?

I signed up for my PADI Divemaster course at Blue Adventures Diving in Crete, Greece during the summer of 2012. Completing the PADI Divemaster course and working with Blue Adventures Diving was both very inspiring and lots of fun, a summer I look back on with a big smile!

Describe a typical day in your working life as a PADI Divemaster?

No day is the same, you meet so many wonderful people and experience something new every day. Regardless if working at dive centers or on live-a-boards, the days differ a lot depending on the setup, where you are and the local conditions which may vary daily. As I alternate between warm waters and freezing cold latitudes, such as Antarctica and the Arctic, my daily activities differ a lot. Having variety is also why I enjoy working as a PADI Divemaster so much!

Picture Credit: Antonis Markakos                                                                                                                    Great memories from Crete where Birgitta spent 6 wonderful months as a PADI Divemaster back in 2012

What have been your most memorable moments working as a PADI Divemaster?

That is a hard one as being a PADI Divemaster offers countless memorable moments. Dancing sea lions showing off in Antarctica, intimate curious Orca encounters in Northern Norway, beautiful and exciting cavern dives in the Mediterranean Sea to name a few… When working as a PADI Divemaster, the most important thing for me is that all guests have fun. Seeing their big smiles and their eagerness for more adventure, are my most memorable moments as a PADI Divemaster.

In 3 words, can you describe your experience being a Divemaster so far?

Fun, Social, Outdoors!

Picture Credit: Edik Skarina                                                                                                                           “Through my work I want to share my immense passion for the wonderful planet we are living on, to inspirit life, raise awareness and inspire others” Birgitta says.

What are your diving plans for the future?

I just returned to Sweden from a 6 month long sail and film expedition in Northern Norway, where we spent most of the winter filming for our ongoing film production which is a collaboration with Swedish National Television. For now, my next diving plans involve more diving and filming around the Swedish west coast and Norway. Due to my many different assignments and my own adventure projects, my life differs a lot each year. When possible, I like to keep myself flexible without planning ahead too much so I have more freedom to take up new opportunities as and when they arise.

I am  excited about many more upcoming adventures and am very much looking forward to continuing sharing my passion for wildlife and the underwater world, and spreading even more smiles as a PADI Divemaster!