Interview: PADI Course Director Zoona Naseem

Zoona Naseem is only the second Maldivian to have attained the rank of PADI Course Director, and the country’s first female to do so. She is the owner of Moodhu Bulhaa Dive Centre in Villingili Island, just 10 minutes away from the capital, and is passionate about getting young people diving. Here she shares her PADI journey, discusses what it’s like to be at the top of a male-dominated industry, and advises instructors on the best way to become a CD.

 What inspired you to become a PADI Pro?

I spent the first few years of my life in a small island in Noonu Atoll in the north of the Maldives, so I was always in the ocean as a child. I learnt how to swim at the same time I learnt how to walk. When I did my first dive at 17, honestly, I found it so easy that I thought to myself ‘Why isn’t everyone doing this? And why are there no female instructors?’ I think I knew after that first dive that I was going to become a PADI Pro.

How do you think you’ve changed as you’ve moved up the ranks to become a PADI Course Director?

I did my IDC when I was 18, straight after leaving school, so I’ve been a PADI Pro for my entire adult life. One of my first jobs was at a resort called Sun Island Resort & Spa and the dive centre was one of the busiest in the country at that time. It was like a dive factory! I got to teach every day and I really developed my skills as a teacher. Of course, later I learnt managerial skills as a dive centre manager but it’s my teaching skills that I am continually improving as I move up the ranks.

What will it mean to the Maldives to have its first female Course Director?

In the Maldives, there are still very few women working in the tourism industry, and I feel that this is down to a lot of lingering misconceptions about resorts amongst Maldivians. But in reality, resorts are fantastic places to work for women. You get exposed to so many different cultures, you save everything you earn and there are lots of opportunities for travel and training. So I think that with a female PADI Course Director working in the country, I can show people what a fantastic industry we are a part of, and what you can achieve as a PADI instructor. My greatest hope is that more women will follow my example, and I have set a personal goal to have two female Maldivian instructors working in my dive centre.

What do you consider to be your greatest achievement in your diving career?

Becoming a Course Director. It was a long journey to get here, and I didn’t really even believe it was possible until recently. Nobody ever told me that this was an option for me! So it definitely feels like a big achievement. And my other greatest achievement, the thing that gives me great happiness, is seeing so many of my students now owning their own dive centres. They are leaders in the Maldivian dive industry, and I’m extremely proud of them.

What does diving give you that nothing else does?

On a personal level, when I’m diving, I get a sense of peace and happiness that I can’t find out of the water. There’s nothing in the world like diving. But as a diver, I also have the chance to be an advocate for our environment, to be a marine ambassador, and that’s a privilege.

Did you have to overcome any fears, challenges or obstacles to get where you are now in your diving career?

When I was working for Banyan Tree International, I was managing five dive centres, plus five water sports centres – so it was a real challenge. And at first, managing all those male employees proved a little tricky. They found it hard to accept a local female as their leader, but I didn’t give up! With a little patience and perseverance, the team soon saw that I knew what I was doing.

Do you believe PADI instructors change others’ lives through diving?

For sure! When you take someone underwater for the first time, they will always remember you. One of my strongest memories was of taking a blind student diving. He simply wanted to experience how it felt to be underwater; to be weightless. We have the chance to create amazing experiences for people, and to educate them about our fragile underwater ecosystems.

Describe in a few sentences how you would convince a non-diver to learn to dive?

Well in the Maldives, it’s pretty easy to convince people, because the best of this country is underwater. There’s not a boring second when you’re diving, and it’s extremely safe. Actually, being underwater is much safer than walking in the busy roads of our capital city!

PADI Course Director Zoona Naseem

What does “Be Best. Be PADI” mean to you?

 It’s simple. PADI is the best diving organisation in the world; there is no comparison. PADI changes lives!

What would you say to other PADI Instructors hoping to become PADI Course Directors?

 I would always encourage instructors to keep moving ahead, and to explore opportunities to increase their training, knowledge and experience. I tell everyone that becoming a PADI Course Director is an option open to them, you just have to work towards it.

What did you enjoy most about completing the PADI Course Director training?

The trainers were without doubt the best part of the course. Their presentations were so entertaining and creative that I honestly never lost focus. And just getting the chance to meet these incredible divers from all over the world and to work on group assignments with them was so enjoyable.

And lastly, what’s your favourite dive site in the Maldives?

Oh, that’s a hard question but I think I’ve got to say Embudu Express, which is a channel that we often visit with our dive centre. There can be dozens of sharks, huge schools of eagle rays, and abundant fish life. But every dive is different, and it depends on how you dive!

 

Crown of Thorns Eradication

As the corals of the Maldives are already vulnerable our understanding and removal efforts of the crown of thorns starfish is paramount to the health of our reef.

Everyday Gili Lankanfushi has sightings of the voracious crown-of-thorns starfish (COT) Acanthaster planci. Native to coral reefs in the Indo-Pacific region and the largest species of starfish (Asteroidea), they are generally seen at depths of up to 30 metres. However, they have also been known to travel between Atolls at great depths of around 200m. There are four species of COT, but it is A. planci which is responsible for coral mortality in the Northern Indian Ocean and the coral triangle. COTS are corallivores and during optimal conditions can grow to over half a meter in diameter and have more than 30 arms.

Crown of Thorns

Generally COTS can be considered a keystone species because they can maintain healthy coral reef diversity by primarily feeding on fast growing corals, such as staghorn and plate (Acropora sp.) and enable the slower massive corals to establish and develop. When coral coverage is low, often resulting from COT outbreaks, COTS will eat PoritesMontipora, sponges, algae and encrusting organisms. One COT can consume all the coral in a 6 to 10m square radius annually, so the impact on an already vulnerable reef is catastrophic. The feeding behaviour is dependent on population density, water motion and species composition. COTS are covered in venomous spines coated with saponin which causes irritation and pain at a puncture wound. The spines are long, sharp and lowered to avoid drag.

Fossil evidence suggests that COTS developed millions of years ago. However, COT outbreaks have only occurred in the last 60 to 70 years and with increasing frequency and intensity. The first recorded outbreak occurred in the 1950s in the Ryukyu Islands off Japan. Combined with anthropogenic threats and other stresses outbreaks are greatly detrimental to coral reef survival and the fish associated with the reef.

Crown of Thorns destruction: 1 – healthy coral, 2 – freshly killed coral, 3 – recently killed portion colonised by algae and bacteria, 4 – long dead coral

COT outbreaks in the Maldives are relatively recent; the first recorded outbreak was in the 1970’s, the second in the 1990’s. Currently we are experiencing an outbreak which started in 2013. It began in North Male Atoll and has spread through to Ari Atoll, Baa Atoll, Lhaviyani Atoll, South Male Atoll and large densities have recently been documented in Shaviyani Atoll.

Outbreaks result for a variety of reasons. Firstly, when there is an excess of nutrients entering the water as a consequence of runoff from sewage, fertiliser and other island practices. The resulting eutrophication leads to increased plankton for the COT larvae and decreased juvenile mortality. Secondly, loss of COT predators; napoleon wrasse, lined worm, harlequin shrimp, starry puffer fish, titan and yellow margin triggerfish and triton’s trumpet (red and spangled emperor and parrotfish have been known to feed off young COTS before they have spines).

COT being predated upon by Triton’s Trumpet.

Loss of predators occurs due to overfishing for the souvenir trade, bycatch and habitat destruction. This leads to a drop in already low predation pressure and results in a COT population surge. Finally, COTS have excellent adaptations as they are resilient organisms with an selected life history (high growth rate, typically exploit less crowded ecological niches and produce many off spring). COT females can produce 65 million eggs annually between October to February. The eggs are released into the water column and are fertilized by clouds of sperm from nearby males. After fertilisation larvae are in their planktonic form and remain that way for weeks. After settling on the sea floor and developing into their adult form they develop their spines and start feeding off coral. This process can take around a year. COTS are most vulnerable before their spines are developed. Additionally, they can survive between 6 to 9 months without food, and body parts lost due to stress or predation can regenerate within 6 months.

Short and long term methods are being established around the world to minimise the effects of current outbreaks and to help prevent future outbreaks. The marine biology team at Gili Lankanfushi is focused on the removal of COTS. Our primary aim is removing these creatures from the overwater villas and jetty’s. Guests and hosts report sightings of COTS, and our team of marine biologists will remove them by injecting them with vinegar. This method is labour intensive and is carried out as regularly as possible by both the Marine Biology team and the Dive Centre.

PADI’s guest blogger Emma Bell introduces herself:

I am a marine biologist and scuba diver from England. I have had the privilege of working in Greece, Seychelles and Maldives. I have worked in an aquaculture research centre where I focused on hormonal manipulation of a pelagic fish species. In addition, I have experience with coral restoration projects including frames and ropes; habitat restoration – crown of thorns, drupella and invasive plant species removal; educational activities and social media updates including blogs. I have also monitored population dynamics of bird, turtle, shark and cetacean species to aid in their conservation. I started my career working in the Maldives and I have done a round trip via Greece, England and Seychelles, I hope to increase my skills set and knowledge further whilst I am at Gili Lankanfushi, Maldives.

 

Colonies of Hope

Blog written by guest blogger and marine biologist Clare Baranowski

Preserving coral reefs is a growing concern in the Maldives

At Gili Lankanfushi, we are recovering our coral reefs through the Coral lines Project. By growing small fragments of coral on hanging ropes (lines) and then transplanting them to our house reef near One Palm Island, we hope to see regeneration and aim to kick start the health of our house reef.

Our Coral Lines Project started three years ago and currently holds around 7484 coral colonies. We are consistently adding small fragments of coral to the already growing population on 153 lines.

Josie monitoring our 153 coral lines

The vulnerable nature of coral populations mean that they undergo cycles of disturbance and recovery. Our house reef was affected by warmer waters created by the El Nino event in 2016 which bleached much of the corals. Yet against all odds, most fragments in our coral lines nursery survived.  They have also been faced with a Crown of Thorns (coral predators) outbreak this year and have still remained intact.

In some cases, the corals in our lines are no longer present on shallow reefs in the area.

Now, is the perfect time to begin stage two of our coral restoration project by moving coral from our nursery to our house reef.  Transplanting coral is a delicate procedure with a lot of trial and error. We began slowly by creating a test site with a small number of coral colonies to ensure we would not lose healthy coral unnecessarily.

Josie beginning the process

We found a site with conditions not too dissimilar to the nursery. The area had to be flat and solid, with no loose material and space for growth.  It also had to be an area that is easily accessible for monitoring, but nowhere in danger of tampering or accidental damage.  We chose a depth of 8 metres in the middle of house reef drop off where we regularly snorkel. Another major concern was the Crown of Thorns Starfish, so we placed the coral in an area visited regularly by Harvey Edwards, Ocean Paradise Dive Centre manager, who has been removing these starfish from the reef for months.

Clare cutting the coral from the line

The next step was to cut the colonies from the lines in the nursery, and transport them in mesh bags in the water. We decided to use three different Acropora species to begin with as they are fast growing and like a lot of light and a moderate current. Once at the site, we cleaned the area of algae and attached the coral to ensure protection from extreme water movement. We placed them an equal distance apart to allow quick growth and attached the coral using epoxy, which is a clay like cement. We were aware from previous studies that Miliput (epoxy clay) has been seen to kill the part of the coral it is attaching, so we placed small amounts of putty at the base of the coral.

Once a week, for a total of six weeks, we will measure growth and survivorship of the coral.  We hope to replicate the test at different depths and locations to find a suitable site to start a larger restoration project. However, we will hold off on most of the major transplantation until after the monsoon season.

Attaching the colonies using epoxy

Due to the fragility of coral species, our rehabilitation plans are very flexible, and subject to a long monitoring period.  We expect to adapt our approach and long term management to ensure we keep up with the changing environment of the reef. Previous restoration plans have been hindered by external threats, so we are so excited to finally begin this project. We will be producing scientific data along the way which we hope will contribute to current coral reef rehabilitation knowledge.

Although our transplants are working well so far, we will still have many question to answer in the future such as: are the corals on the house reef still reproducing? As these corals survived the last bleaching, will they be more genetically suited to future hostile conditions? The answers to these questions are all just a work in progress and we will have to keep on watching and learning as we replant and monitor these corals over the next few years. As our house reef sustained a lot of mortality and the coral cover is low, we hope that this new project will help to rejuvenate the reef and raise awareness.

PADI’s guest blogger Clare Baranowski introduces herself:

I am a marine zoologist from the UK who has worked throughout the tropics researching mega fauna and reef ecosystems in the Caribbean and Indian Ocean. I have experience monitoring and restoring coral and surveying manta, turtle and dolphin populations. I began my career as a science communicator before moving into research and management roles, this is why I incorporate outreach and education into every project I work on and I hope to continue this at Gili Lankanfushi.

“Person of the Year”

“Person of the Year” of the Republic of Maldives

Maldives First PADI Course Director Mr.Hussain Rasheed Sendi was named “Person of the Year”  at Maldives Travel Awards People’s Edition by Maldives Association of Travel Agents and Tourators (MATATO).

Sendi who is also the Managing Director of Dive Oceanus has been among the active dive industry professionals who have worked hard in training the youth as dive masters and instructors. His contribution to keep the marine industry safe is remarkable while his experience and knowledge to keep the diving industry going ahead by awareness programmes on species and environment have benefited the tourism industry and the nation.

The first event of Maldives Travel Awards People’s Edition has been held on 13th July at Adaaran Select Hudhuranfushi in North Male’ Atoll.

Ten Individuals were honored with the title of “Person of the Year” at the special function. MATATO started the Nation’s first travel industry recognition brand in 2012 and succesfully deleivered Maldives Travel Award events in the country and a special edition in Dubai.

In 2017 MATATO has introduced 3 editions of Maldives Travel Awards, recognizing Guesthouses, People’s Edition and the Gala.

 

 

No Limit Diving

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Cast your mind back to that moment when you decided that you wanted to become a PADI Pro. It may have been what got you started diving or it may have been during one of your courses when you had that Eureka moment and decided that teaching divers to dive was for you. No matter when you started you immediately had that thirst for knowledge and wanted to learn  more.

Generally most people start their professional path with the rescue course. Besides learning many important rescue skills you would have also learnt many new Physiological terms that you may not have previous encountered. Things like Arterial Gas embolisms, Sub Cutaneous Emphysemas and Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation. Your quest for knowledge was unending and you sought out seasoned instructors to feed you with the knowledge you craved.

Then you started your Divemaster course. Again there was so much to learn, both in the classroom and underwater. Theory became even more daunting, physics was a nightmare and would you ever master decompression theory and the Recreational Dive Planner? But you studied hard, practised your diving skills repeatedly and that day finally dawned when you could stand proud as one of the elite, a PADI Divemaster.

Onwards and upwards, next came your \instructor development course. Seven to ten days of early mornings and late nights, cramming in as much knowledge as possible. From knowledge development presentations, Dive Theory, General Standards and procedures you worked late into the night to get it all perfected for the Instructor Exam.

Once again you stood proud, this time as a PADI Instructor. Ready to start teaching people how to dive. And so you did. And you are a good instructor, training divers the way they should be taught. But what have you done to further your knowledge since becoming an instructor?

Its important that as a PADI Instructor that you should continue with your own personal development. The more knowledgeable you are, the better an instructor you will be. Its easy to stay up to date.

Make sure you register for the quarterly training bulletins. Ensure that you download the latest instructor manual as part of your yearly renewal benefit. Read the PADI blogs that appear monthly. Further develop your training. Sign up for speciality courses with a PADI Course director thereby ensuring that you gain from their knowledge. Read diving magazines and publications. Do equipment servicing courses with equipment manufacturers.Make the effort to develop yourself and your students will ultimately be the ones to benefit the most.

Do not stop learning. Do not limit yourself. No limit diving.

Big Business for Prodivers Maldives

Divers who signed up to join the Noon Atoll full-day trip with Kuredu Prodivers hoped to see some ‘big-stuff action’ with the locally renowned shark spot, Orimas Thila, high on their agenda. They got rather more than they bargained for…Blue Whale

On their way back, whilst on their dhoni, crossing the channel between the Noon and Lhaviyani Atolls, something big was spotted in the water – or rather something massive!

Blue Whale

In fact, they witnessed the largest creature ever to have lived on Earth – a Blue Whale! Great excitement ensued and estimates of size range from ‘huge’, 12 metres and 18 metres. Blue whales can grow to over 33 metres in length and have a heart weighing as much as a car. Their huge mouth can fit 100 people inside but, fear not, we are not on their menu; Blue Whales are filter feeders and eat krill – shrimp-like invertebrates.

Blue Whales have been around on Earth for about 54 million years and were once prolific, but in the first half of the 20th century they were almost hunted to extinction. There are now an estimated total of 10.000 – 25,000 individuals left on the planet and the International Union for Conservation of Nature (IUCN) Red List rates them as ‘endangered’. While whaling is no longer a threat, increased shipping leading to more collisions, oil spills and climate change all threaten the existence of the majestic Blue Whales. Blue Whale

 The ocean is full of surprises and, as well as the usual exciting encounters of sharks and manta rays, as you can see, every now and then something a little more unusual and unexpected turns up.

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New Year News – A short heads up on 2017

Hi all,

With this being a monthly blog aimed at the North of the UK I wanted to share some useful information that will hopefully bring you all a few bits of success in 2017

Freediving

I have mentioned the PADI Freediver programme before and what benefits it will bring to your Centre http://wp.me/s4SSW1-9766. It brings me great joy to announce that we now have Steve Millard on board as a PADI Freediving Instructor trainer. Steve has a long history with Freediving so I was very happy when he spoke with me about choosing PADI to help grow the Sport within the UK. Steve is happy to be your go-to person to either bring you (or the team) up to speed as freediving instructors and beyond. Or if you see the business sense to add it to your centre but don’t feel you can do it justice then he could be your instructor for hire to start building your Squad.

If you have not tried it yourself the PADI Freediver manual is 3 courses in one (Freediver, advanced Freediver and master Freediver). I will be going on the road with Rich Somerset, Steve and some of the major brands to run the Business of freediving workshops. Please let me know if you are in the UK North and would like to find out more.

Here is the latest video on the PADI YouTube channel

Live Events 2017

I will be on tour with some of the big guns looking at workshops, training and forums across the North of the UK. Locations we are looking at are

  • Newcastle – Forum, freediving and equipment in.
  • Leeds – Business Academy
  • Capernwary – Dive day, drysuit and Forum.
  • Blue lagoon, Dive day, speciality Schermafbeelding 2017-01-13 om 14.44.50workshop and Forum.
  • 8 Acre – freediving.
  • Stoney, Forum – freediving and equipment.
  • The Delph- Forum, drysuit and equipment.
  •  Gildenburgh – Dive day, drysuit and Forum.
  • Orkney – Forum.
  • Edinburgh equipment, Dive day and Forum.
  • Glasgow, equipment, Dive day and Forum.

This is not a definitive list as there are a couple of big events in the pipeline but, as I write this blog these are what I have planned for the first 6 months. I will be looking to do a good number of private forums still this year also.

Events will be shared on Eventbrite, Facebook and direct emails.

PADI Business Academy PBA Lite 2017 Blog Header

 

There is a planned Business Academy in Leeds on 3rd of July. If you have never been on one then you are missing out. We cover a whole load of Business training in an environment that you can focus on the Job in Hand. Let me know if you would like some details but it is worth coming along from a Networking point alone as there will be like minded Peers who are driven to make a success of their business.

Pricing Work Shops.

One of the most commonly raised points on a meeting is over prices. Only you know your costs but what I can help with is to make sure you are getting a profit from really crunching the numbers and suggesting solutions. Do you know which items are given you the best returns? This workshop something that can be done remotely and is a real commitment in time for both yourself and me so this will be on the first come first severed basis. But if you would like to work on it yourself then I am more than happy to send you the files to work on. As with all things that are finance you have, to be honest with the report you are running and anything shared with me will be kept in confidence.

PADI Sales incentive 2017

Emily and Su-Li have been working hard with Emma and Myself to really look at a sustained campaign for 2017. Please call them in the office for the details but it would be worth your while to get up to speed on the offers and factor them into your pricing. PADI staffThere is only one goal that we have as your PADI team and that is to help you do as well as possible. We are all believers in growing the UK market and have invested heavily in marketing the UK to new divers.

London outdoor and adventure show 2017

I will not be at the show myself this year as I will be expecting to be a dad part 2 over that weekend. A shame not to see you all but… I hope you understand. The rest of the team will be there so please come and see them. But again the main focus of the PADI stand will be to reach out to new and old divers alike to drive them into PADI dive Centres to help bring them to the underwater world that we all hold so dear.

I am looking forward to seeing you over the coming 12 months but please email/call/facebook/Whatsapp/etc etc if you need any help.

One last video to leave you with as a hopeful touch of inspiration.

PADI Business Academy Lite 2017 Schedule & Pricing

PBA Lite 2017 Blog HeaderSupercharge Your Dive Operation in 2017 & Beyond

Want to streamline your multi-channel marketing strategies this year and improve the overall effectiveness of your initiatives?  Learn how by attending one of the PADI Business Academy Lite one day Seminars.

1 day PADI Business Academy Lite – €99 – £88 – CHF107

2017 Presentation Topics

The PADI Business Academy Lite focuses on the integration of both a strong digital marketing strategy as well as business, sales, customer service and training opportunities.

PBA Lite attendees will benefit from presentations on:

• Website enhancement
• Sales techniques
• Social Media
• Customer Service improvements

And as a Business Academy Graduate attendees will be entitled to an exclusive Sales Promotion, helping to drive their digital business forward.

To register, simply click here to download and complete the form and return it to David Protheroe in the Marketing department.

Date Country City Language
22 February Sweden Stockholm English
27 February Sweden Göteborg English
20 March Switzerland  Bern German
22 March Denmark Copenhagen Danish
7th April Portugal Lisbon Portuguese
9th April Saudi Arabia Jeddah Arabic
21st April UAE Dubai English / Arabic
25th April Spain Madrid Spanish
26th April Spain Barcelona Spanish
2nd May Cyprus Paphos English
3rd May Cyprus Protaras English
10th May Canary Islands Lanzarote English
12th May Canary Islands Tenerife English
27th – 28th June Maldives Villa College Male English
24th – 25th July Cape Verde Santa Maria Portuguese
1st September Italy Ustica Italian
October Zanzibar Zanzibar Town English

EXCLUSIVE SALES OFFER!
Register today and as an attendee you will be entitled to our exclusive 5-4-4 sales offer on all digital products¹

OWD_touch¹Valid on all PADI digital products excluding eLearning for PBA Lite 2017 attendees.

*Please note that PBAs shown in this Schedule may be subject to change or to be cancelled. If you plan to attend a 2017 Business Academy Lite, please check this schedule regularly. Additional PBAs may be added during the year.

** For accounts purposes the currency charged will be reflective of the currency that the attendees pays their renewal fee in, irrespective of PADI Business Academy Lite location.

***Price does not include VAT

5 PADI Pro Tips: How to Deal with Nervous Students

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The first breaths underwater are always very exciting for first-time divers, and usually the fascination for this new underwater world is much bigger than any fears. Sometimes, however, there are some new divers who are very nervous about learning to dive, and need to be treated very carefully by their PADI Instructor.

Follow these 5 tips on working with nervous divers to help alleviate their fears and encourage them to succeed in the best possible way.

#1 – Talk to your students about their fears

If you notice that one of your students is very anxious, then you should talk to them about their fears and concerns. Ask them questions to help identify what and where the problem is, and explain to them objectively, using facts and reassurance, about why there is no need to be scared.

#2 – Explain all of the exercises in detail in your briefing

As a PADI Pro you’ve already learned to describe and explain all the skills, exercises and dives which you’re performing with other divers or students.

If you have one or more anxious divers in your group, you should extend your briefings and deal with the concerns of the divers. Prepare your group and let them know what could be the challenges during the exercises or dives you’ll do together – and tell them how to deal with them in the best way.

#3 – Position anxious students correctly

If you’re doing underwater skills with students, or guiding a dive for a group of divers, then make sure that any nervous members of the group are always very close to you.

While training for skills in larger groups, any nervous divers should never sit completely at the end of the row. If possible, they should always have another diver on either side.
Make sure you begin the practice of diving skills with a more confident diver – not with someone who is already anxious. This reduces the nervousness when one sees that another diver masters the skill without any problems.

If you’re guiding a group with an anxious diver, you should offer them to dive directly behind you. Form a buddy team, and give them the safety and attention they need to build confidence underwater.

#4 – Reduce the distance between nervous divers

As a PADI Pro you’ll already know that you need to stay close to your diving students to have complete control over them. However, if you have a very nervous student in your group you should pay special attention to stay as close as possible to them in particular. This makes it possible for you to intervene at any time, and gives them a feeling of safety and security.

#5 – Give anxious students frequent commendation

After each training session, you should highlight one thing in every debriefing that all diving students have done particularly well – that’s what we call positive reinforcement.
With anxious divers in your group you can expand this positive reinforcement even more and give them extra commendation for things they have mastered. With this additional positivity and praise, you’ll push the self-confidence of anxious divers, which in turn will help to relieve their nervousness and boost their confidence in the water.

Extra Tip: Work in small groups with more time – if possible!

Where possible, work in groups of max. two divers, and plan more time for your course from the beginning – this should be helpful for anxious divers who will feel less pressured by others’ progress. In a smaller group, you can respond even more effectively to the problems and concerns of each student.


christian_huboThis article was written by guest blogger, Christian Hubo. A PADI diving instructor, Christian has enjoyed over 4,000 dives whilst travelling around the world. Above the surface, he’s hiked thousands of kilometers across the natural world. Christian is a freelance web and media designer, underwater photographer, social media and marketing consultant and freelance author. His magazine articles and blog, Feel4Nature, inspires people to follow an independent, individual and eco-conscious lifestyle.

PADI Business Academy Bristol

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PADI EMEA is proud to welcome in its EMEA office the final PADI Business Academy of the year.

During this unique event, the biggest one for 2016, the 33 attendees from dive centres all around the EMEA region will be going through a series of presentations and workshops on all the aspects of running a dive centre from website design, online strategies and pricing issues.

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This exceptional PADI Business Academy is presented in 5 languages (Spanish, French, English, Italian and German) by your PADI EMEA management team and Regional Managers.

The 2-day program will enable PADI business owners to expand their knowledge, get the latest PADI products updates and meet other from the diving industry and all the PADI staff.

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We wish all our Bristol PADI attendees a successful PADI Business Academy.

Do not miss out on your chance to join a PADI Business Academy next year! The 2017 schedule will soon be available.

For more information on this program please download the 2016 brochure here.

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