Marketing, ideas to help with your Dive business.

We all know there is a cost involved in advertising to new and none divers, but this is should be considered a fundamental on going running cost. We here at PADI we are reaching out to both new and established divers on your behalf on multiple platforms (online, in print, events and shows, TV etc. etc.) and of course we try and bring those inspired customers through your Centre’s door. It is great to hear so many people to asking to get their PADI, no matter whether that is a DSD to DM or beyond.

I have been hearing great things about the ongoing Get your PADI in the UK promotion we have been running on Facebook and the number of clicks to the micro site (https://dive.padi.com/EMEA_UK/english/) speak for themselves. The success of “Get your PADI” campaign has led to a further 57 being developed and we are reaching out in 6 languages in 14 Countries, with multiple regions within each.

The above was just one campaign and not cheap to do, what I am looking to do is share some ideas that you can implement. So I have done a few ideas to hopefully spark some ideas for you.

Landing Pages

These are important to understand what they are, you need to be able to do them quickly and easily. The general idea is that you will point people to these pages from any form of online marketing. You could have it as a Competition, e-mailing, Facebook ad, and newsletter. There needs to be a reason why someone will either sign up or give you their details and it needs to be easy for them to do it. Think about screen size on catchy text. There is no point paying for a campaign if that data is going to get lost of someone gives up the will to complete the process of filling it in.

Events

A couple of examples. PADI recently was a completely none diving Event for above water sports, we got our foot in the door at the national watersports festival. PADI then teamed up with a local dive centre to help run DSD’s and we then both spread the message of diving to everyone attending. As this was a National event I was pointing people to their nearest dive centre for when they return home. Another recent and month long event has seen PADI teaming up with the Aqua Lung to help promote learning to dive in a Drysuit to those Centres customers who had taken up the offer. As you are hopefully aware you can easily “bolt on” the Drysuit course to both the Openwater and Advanced Openwater Diver Courses. Those PADI Centre’s who took part ran a promotion for learning to dive or taking their Drysuit Course as a “Fusion” distinctive Speciality. It was great fun and meant I was at different sites over the various weekends. I am looking to do more of the same. 

But, what about taking part in a local event to yourself? Have you thought about summer fairs, corporate events, market or a creative car boot stall? It shouldn’t have to cost lots but it should look professional. Reaching out to none divers it is important to look like they will be safe in your hands. PADI has a budget to help with none dive show events and as a 5* Centre you can apply for a marketing support pack (packs are limited to a specified budget but you should get in touch with your Regional Manager regardless).

What about running a regular Project AWARE event and adopting a dive site?  https://www.projectaware.org/

Funding

You should look at ways and means to apply for funding. Funding can unlock the means to really do something special to help those that may not normally get to take part in our beautiful sport. I have been keen to follow what Herts Dive Club has been doing since they were awarded Lottery Funding

http://www.hertsdiveclub.co.uk/i-can-dive-a-lottery-funded-initiative/.

It really does pay to give back as there is a huge about of positive messaging that comes out of doing something that makes a difference.

Corporate

Have you reached out to your big local businesses? It is worth knowing that most companies will have a staff benefits scheme. If you are not on that list then why not. Let your regional manager know if you would like some help getting your foot in the door.

Youth Market

Don’t forget there is a huge promotion that PADI is doing with regards to helping your centre with the youth market. If you are not yet on the PADI approved youth training scheme please get in touch with the office.

If you would like more help with Marketing why not sign up for the PADI Business Academy?

Kuredu, Sea Turtles Heaven

Since 4th November 2016, 74 sea turtles have been registered around Kuredu (Kuredu House Reef/Laoon, Kuredu Express, Kuredu Caves and Kuredu Coral Garden). 58 of those individuals are Green sea turtles (Chelonia mydas).

The reef around Kuredu houses almost one third of all registered Green sea turtles in the Maldives. Incredible! The island is an important feeding and nesting ground for Green sea turtles.

The Stars:

Audrey (GR459) is a regular in Kuredu Lagoon and often observed enjoying her sea grass meals. This Green turtle is easily identified by its missing left rear flipper. Despite being handicapped, Audrey is in good shape (and has a big appetite)!

Pia (456) is a juvenile Green sea turtle with a shell length of about 40cm. With 20 registered sightings, Pia is the most sighted individual at Kuredu Caves!

Bjoern (GR38) is one of the first identified sea turtles in the Maldives. Also, he is the only male at Kuredu Caves! His impressive size of 70cm in shell length and the long tail gives him away as a male. The length of a sea turtle’s tail tells the sex.

Every sea turtle has a unique scale pattern on the left and right side of its head. This pattern allows for individual identification and population assessments. As part of the “Hurawalhi sea turtle ID project”, every sea turtle sighting is registered. Supporting the project will be rewarded! If you submit right and left side pictures of a newly identified sea turtle, you can name it! Become a sea turtle’s namesake for a kind donation of $50 to the Olive Ridley Project. You will receive a naming certificate and updates whenever your sea turtle gets relighted.

FUN FACT: Green Sea Turtles can hold their breath for over 4 hours.

 

Prodivers is one of the leading dive and watersport operators in the Maldives with currently five 5* PADI dive centres. If you are fancy visiting them please check out their website www.prodivers.com

Kuredu Express – One dive site, endless experiences

A favourite dive site of many guests, Kuredu Express is full of surprises – the varied topography coupled with the ever-changing current conditions mean it’s never the same dive twice. This well-known site is dived by Prodivers Kuredu 3-4 times a week, and during the last 10 years we’ve dived it a whopping 2337 times!

What makes Kuredu Express so alluring?

Currents

The ‘Express’ part of the site’s name comes from the currents that flow here – sometimes fast and furious, sometimes mild and mellow but often quickly changing. The outreef current and channel currents each play their part in how the site is dived, adding to the variety of diving on offer here. Due to the rapid changes in currents, divers can encounter a vast variety of marine life which makes diving on Kuredu Express a special and unique experience. With the right conditions this site can be accessible to most qualified divers.

Topography

It’s a dramatic site with three distinct areas – the sandy channel, the corner with large terraces and the huge overhangs or bays at the start of the outreef.

Sharks!

Famous as having one of the largest shark populations in the Lhaviyani Atoll, with the right conditions the shark action here can be mind blowing, but there’s more to the life on Kuredu Express than just sharks… there’s an enormous quantity of schooling fish, eagle rays, sting rays, napoleon, tuna and, on rare occasions, even hammerhead sharks. Turtles, moray eels, and even leaf fish have been found here too. If it’s the sharks that interest you, learn about them prior to a dive with them during our Maldivian Shark and Ray Diver course, a PADI Distinctive Specialty.

Great photographic opportunities

With a small current divers can take their time exploring the overhangs and getting great shots with blue water background and, when the current is pumping, simply hang on and enjoy the show unfold at the corner as the pelagic photobomb your every shot!

Location

Just 5 minutes from Kuredu jetty – it doesn’t get much more convenient than this.

On 12th April 2017, Laurie Miller, 40 time repeater guest on Kuredu, dived Kuredu Express for the 150th time. He is a passionate diver and his knowledge of marine life is impressive. We asked Laurie to share his views about our beloved Kuredu Express:

What is it about Kuredu Express that fascinates you?

“It’s like doing 3 dives in one. First you have the deep channel with nice overhangs where strong currents present the opportunity to see some of the bigger fish, then you have the outreef where we usually see the big Napoleons and lastly the bays where the fish life is booming.”

What are your most memorable moments on Kuredu Express?

“When the sharks are swimming between the divers. First time I’ve ever seen a Blacktip reef shark was on Express. One of the few places where you will find the Palette Surgeonfish, a.k.a. Blue Tang, a.k.a. Dory. I’ve seen the peacock flounder there as well.”

How would you sum up Kuredu Express?

“It’s a different experience with new challenges every time you do it because of the different currents.”

We left Laurie to enjoy the rest of his 40th stay on Kuredu, in fact he’s still here, enjoying diving free of charge as a special perk for visiting 40 times. Check out our generous Repeater Discount Program and you could follow in Laurie’s footsteps

In Depth: Dive Against Debris Specialty

Many divers are taking action to help fight marine debris. Teaching the Dive Against Debris® Distinctive Specialty is a great way to encourage your students to comprehend the global threat of marine debris and take meaningful steps to protect our oceans.

Who can teach Dive Against Debris®?
All renewed PADI instructors can apply to teach the Project AWARE®’s Dive Against Debris® Distinctive Specialty after completing a Dive Against Debris® Distinctive Specialty Instructor Course with a PADI Course Director, or by direct application.                                                                        

What do I need to be able to teach Dive Against Debris®?
You will need the Dive Against Debris® Instructor Guide and the Dive Against Debris® Specialty Course toolkit.

How can I link this with other courses?

The revised and updated PADI Advanced Open Water Diver course gives your students the chance to experience a Dive Against Debris® Adventure Dive – if you’re certified as an instructor in the specialty, and the student diver meets the specialty prerequisites.

If you conduct your PADI Open Water Diver course open water dives over 2 days, you may consider adding the Dive Against Debris® Distinctive Specialty as an optional dive once your students have completed their final PADI Open Water Diver Course dive.

Dive centres with a dive club, can offer the Dive Against Debris® course to club members, so they can collect debris and record their data, which may not already be monitored.

Also make sure you ask your students to choose a Project AWARE version of their PADI certification card to support a clean and healthy ocean.

 Schools and youth groups
The Dive Against Debris® course is a great opportunity to promote scuba diving to local schools and youth groups. School children will learn about the PADI Open Water Diver course, which covers various curriculum subjects including physics and physiology, and also about global conservation whilst having the opportunity to contribute to marine debris citizen science by logging their data on the Project AWARE website.

If you are not already registered as a PADI Approved Youth Centre (available for UK dive centres only) download the PADI Approved Youth Centre information pack. Send your completed PADI Approved Youth Training Centre application (located in the Appendix of the PADI Approved Youth Centre information pack) to your Regional Training Consultant su-li.wong@padi.com or emily.petley-jones@padi.com.

 

PADI Embraces Earth Day with Partnerships to Support Our Oceans

With Earth Day just a few days away, PADI® is building on its longstanding history of conservation by joining forces to further support two of its Four Pillars of Change: Ocean Health and Marine Animal Protection. While continuing to support Project AWARE® in its efforts to reduce marine debris and protect endangered sharks and rays, PADI is also supporting initiatives with additional organizations that are making a positive impact on the ocean planet, including the United Nations Development Programme and Mission Blue™.

Healthy Ocean, Healthy Planet

Aligning with the United Nation’s Sustainable Development Goal 14: Life Below Water, PADI Regional Headquarters, Members and divers around the world can increase efforts to conserve and sustainably use the oceans, seas and marine resources. Leading up to World’s Oceans Day on 8 June 2017, PADI will be joining in the #SaveOurOcean dialog initiated by the United Nations Development Programme to support the implementation of Sustainable Development Goal 14. Through PADI communication channels, PADI Members and divers will be engaged in conversations to increase awareness about the importance of ocean health and its effect on the bigger sustainability agenda to end poverty, protect the planet, and ensure prosperity for all.

PADI is also working with Mission BlueTM to support its efforts to protect marine areas. Sharing stories of Hope Spots – a term for special places critical to ocean health, dubbed by Dr. Sylvia Earle and Mission Blue – help identify areas that are precursors for marine protected areas. Nominating Hope Spots provides an opportunity for the PADI family and the dive industry to help reach the goal set forth by the International Union for Conservation of Nature (IUCN) World Conservation Congress to protect 30 percent of our world’s oceans by 2030. In the coming months, the PADI community will share in the effort to protect more of our world’s waters by joining forces in recognizing important marine areas.

One Dive at a Time

With PADI support, Project AWARE continues its vital work to protect our ocean planet – one dive at a time. From collective action in local communities to large-scale change at the policy level, Project AWARE partners with PADI Members and divers to reduce the amount of marine debris entering our ocean to protecting the world’s most threatened species of sharks and rays. Diver support is imperative for the oceans’ future. PADI Divers are encouraged to dive into action and show their support through direct donations to Project AWARE, as well as in grassroots efforts including Dive Against Debris® and Adopt a Dive SiteTM. All dive professionals are also reminded to take advantage of Project AWARE’s 10 Tips for Divers Action Kit.

While in the early stages of building its new corporate social responsibility program, PADI is committed to activating its members and divers in support of global efforts to improve the future of the oceans under the structure of Four Pillars of Change. By taking action to reduce marine debris, establish more marine protected areas and protect marine animals, together we can increase biodiversity and work toward sustainable management of the oceans and their resources. While this topic is top of mind on Earth Day, on 22 April 2017, PADI is committed to bringing this conversation to the forefront year-round. PADI Members and divers are driving change every day and can share their stories to inspire others to do the same. If you have a story you want to share, email fourpillarsofchange@padi.com.

Be Best. Be PADI – The Way the World Learns to Dive®

Project AWARE – Dive against Debris in the Canaries and Switzerland

The 4th of March 2017 – was a great day for Project AWARE in the Canary Islands and Switzerland! Two Key Accounts in my Regions organised on the same day a Project AWARE Dive against Debris with outstanding results!

 

 

Dive against Debris Crew Tenerife

One Project AWARE Dive Against Debris event happened in Tenerife in the Canary Islands and has been organised by the Big Fish Dive Center in Los Cristianos. The other event has been organised by Adventure Sports and the Dive Club Rheindive.ch from Frauenfeld & Eschenz in Switzerland.
Both Events were organised almost similar. The Event from Adventure Sports in Switzerland started the evening before with the orientation for the Project AWARE Dive against Debris course – while the event in Tenerife started in the morning of the 4th of March.

It was amazing to see how passionate the participants were involved to clean the Beach underwater in Playas las vistas In Tenerife and in the “Untersee” in Steckborn. Even more impressive was the amount of rubbish who has been removed from the Atlantic and from the Lake of Constance.

Big Fish Tenerife

Data collected:
Divers collected the following amount in Tenerife;
66 KG 

 

 

 

 

Divecorner Frauenfeld

 

 

Divers collected the following amount in Steckborn;
259 KG 

 

 

A big Thank you goes to the organizers in both Countries. Thank you Michal Motylewski and Sandro Krawinkler!

The world and our environment needs more people like you! You are an inspiration for all of us and I hope that with your example we can make a difference and animate more Dive Centres, Divers and citizens of both regions to protect our beloved environment!

 

 

 

 

Dive against Debris Crew Steckborn

How can you help to protect the ocean?

Dive Against Debris is a global marine debris survey – the only data collection effort of its kind that involves volunteer divers collecting, recording and reporting data on marine debris found on the seafloor. Marine debris is a problem that is often considered ‘out of sight – out of mind.’ By sharing data on the debris we find underwater, we’re able to contribute the underwater perspective. It’s really exciting – divers can have a powerful role to play in helping contribute data to influence marine debris policy.
So how can you get started?

1. Download our Dive Against Debris Survey Toolkit – here you’ll find the survey kit for your divers, including a certificate to award to your volunteers.
2. Add your action to our Event Map. Create your My Ocean profile and add your action to our interactive map for our dive community to see. You can also blog and upload photos or videos in My Ocean.

3
. Promote over social media, through your network and communications – don’t forget to use the following hashtags #ProjectAWARE, #DiveAgainstDebris, #MarineDebris, etc.
4. Report your data. Data is critical. Don’t let your dives go to waste. Make sure you report the data on the litter you found.
5. Share the data with your divers by showing them the Dive Against Debris Map.

 
Project AWARE ® can offer you mesh bags and a banner to advertise your action during the day. Each mesh bag comes with a donation of € 6.00. This way, Project AWARE is able to send you some other promotional materials to use during your action (leaflets, posters, stickers, badges, etc.).
Adopt a Dive Site™ is a campaign where Project AWARE launched last year on Earth Day, which basically is repeated Dive Against Debris surveys in one dive site: Project AWARE requires divers adopting a specific dive site to clean up and report data at least once a month. You can find all information on the website www.projectaware.org and if you are interested, just sign up on the website.

Start your Ocean protection today, sign up with adopt a dive site and take an example of the two Dive Centres in Switzerland and in the Canaries! Together we can make a difference and educate the coming generations!

I still believe in us humans and that we can change the current situation, but the time is ticking… Our beautiful environment is counting on you!
#myOcean #myHope

Sharks, Rays and Turtles – Your PADI Speciality with Prodivers Kuredu

Photo by Stefanie Wagner

Photo by Ray van Eeden

You got to love sharks, rays and turtles! In fact, at Kuredu Prodivers we love our residents so much that we’ve compiled everything we know about them and created two specialty courses that you should put on your must-do list: Maldivian Shark & Ray Distinctive Specialty Course, and Sea Turtle Diver Course. These two courses provide the best way for you to learn more about these incredible animals – and of course see them in their natural environment, at reefs around Kuredu.

Photo by Stefanie Wagner

Photo by Stefanie Wagner

During the Maldivian Shark and Ray course you will find out more about the incredible sensory system that sharks and rays possess, learn how to identify the different species, determine their gender and understand the mating behaviour, as well as the need for us to preserve and protect the current populations of sharks and rays. The narrow channels, where the currents flow in and out of the atoll and the deep out reefs around Kuredu are the ideal habitat to get encounters with sharks and rays.

Photo by Marek Machinia

Photo by Marek Machinia

For those of you prefer the sleepy headed sea turtles, the Sea Turtle Course will surely be of interest to you, especially since Kuredu is home to the largest known population of Green Sea Turtles in the Maldives. With over 63 identified individuals resident around the island, this makes it the perfect place to enrol in the course. It offers the chance to learn more about how turtles have adapted and evolved through their fight for survival, and you will also learn how to identify the different species and to distinguish whether they are male and female, and how they reproduce. Are you familiar with the famous Kuredu Caves, a.k.a. Turtle Airport? The course is also available to snorkelers.

Photo by Stefanie Wagner

Photo by Stefanie Wagner

The PADI Maldivian Shark & Ray Distinctive Specialty Course was developed by Prodivers to help increase the awareness about these magnificent creatures. Get in touch with us to find out more about diver qualification requirements for the courses.

Visit www.prodivers.com or drop us an email via info@prodivers.com

Prodivers-logo_263x55

PADI Pioneers: Generating Ocean Warriors in the Maldives

In a quiet corner of a luxury resort in the Maldives you’ll find an PADI Five Star IDC centre quite unlike any other.

Picture77

Teaching Maldivians to scuba dive might seem to some like selling coals to Newcastle. Wherever you stand in the Maldives, you’re always barely a stone’s throw from the ocean, and many Maldivians can swim before they can walk. Diving is in the country’s DNA.

It could come as a surprise to some then, that until the mid-2000s, there were only a handful of places offering PADI Instructor Development Courses in the country, with many aspiring instructors actually having to travel to Thailand to complete their certifications.

Founding an Institution

Luckily, this didn’t go unnoticed by Hussain ‘Sendi’ Rasheed, the Maldives’ first and only PADI Course Director and in 2006, he decided to do something about it. Working at the time as the operations manager of Holiday Island Resort & Spa, part of the Villa conglomerate, Sendi approached the company chairman – the Hon. Qasim Ibrahim – and shared his concerns about the lack of educational opportunities for local dive and water sport professionals.

Picture1

 

The conversation would not only change his own life, but would ultimately change the face of diving education in the Maldives. Convinced by the lack of Maldivian educational facilities for divers, Mr Ibrahim asked Sendi to oversee the development of an institution that would change all that. Like Sendi, he wanted to provide a space for Maldivians to become qualified leaders in the diving field. And with that, The Villa Institute of Water Sports and Hospitality was born the same year.

A Place in the Sun

Purpose-built in a quiet corner of Sun Island Resort & Spa (another Villa Hotel), the institute quickly became a hub for young dive and water sports enthusiasts hoping to make a career in the industry. With spacious student and teacher accommodation and modern classrooms overlooking a lagoon that welcomes whale sharks and manta rays to its outer reef, the establishment is enough to make any Course Director drool.

Picture4j

 

But what makes the institute really special is what it aims to achieve. Its objective? To equip a new generation of certified PADI Dive Masters and Instructors with the skills needed to become not only leaders in the field of recreational diving tourism but also trailblazers in ecological advocacy.

Expansion and Diversification

Lofty goals to say the least, but within a few short years it has managed to do just that. After a restructuring to become the founding faculty of Villa College, (now the Maldives’ leading private education provider offering courses in everything from marketing to law) and an expansion to include facilities in the capital, the reigns were handed over to Dr. Sham’aa ‘Anna’ Hameed. Under her leadership and the close involvement of Sendi, the institute is well on track to realise its vision.

Picture2

Not only does the faculty run multiple PADI Instructor Development Courses throughout the year, it now offers Certificate Three, foundation and even degree courses in marine studies that offer PADI electives as course credit.

Ocean Warriors

These courses provide students with the tools to become innovators in the field of marine studies. As a result, graduating students go on to enter the Maldivian workforce in a number of roles: as dive and water sports instructors of course, but also as researchers, marine biologists, wildlife rangers, even government environmental officials and legislators.

Picture99

What started as an initiative of affirmative action to provide quality education and training for locals has now developed into an educational model that is forward thinking on an international level. As such, they are arming a legion of self-titled ‘Ocean Warriors’ with the skills to be the next generation of environmental guardians and leaders in the Maldivian diving industry.

 

About the author: Adele Verdier-Ali is a freelance travel writer and content marketer who has been living in the Maldives for over six years. She’s a certified PADI rescue diver and when she’s not underwater, she writes about Maldivian culture and tourism. You can read more of her thoughts over on www.littlebirdjournal.com

baa-dharavandhoo-1

 

ScubaFest Cornwall

ScubaFest 2017

 

It’s time to dust off your suit and get your regulators serviced…

You are invited to Cornwall ScubaFest 2017 from

Saturday 29th April – Monday 1st May

The annual Cornwall ScubaFest event is back. For three days over the Spring Bank Holiday – Saturday 29th April to Monday 1st May 2017 – scuba divers take over the Pentewan Sands Holiday Park. The event, organised and hosted by SITA (SCUBA Industries Trade Association), celebrates what great British diving is all about. A full schedule of events can be found at the ScubaFest website.

PADI EVENTS

PADI and Project AWARE will support the event, delivering a range of seminars and courses.

Saturday 29th April

PATA PADI Advanced Training Academy

PADI Advanced Training Academy

With both dry and in-water components, this programme, for PADI Pros, increases individual expertise and allows participants to network, build new friendships and learn from each other. Programme attendance also provides credit for Master Instructor and CDTC applications. (See a testimonial from previous attendees)

PADI Member Forum

2017 PADI Member Forum is an exciting, informative journey through the new, cutting-edge, educational tools in the PADI digital library. The seminar will feature a risk management presentation along with an interactive Q&A session about PADI Standards.

Sunday 30th April

Emergency First Response Instructor Trainer course

The EFR Instructor Trainer course includes online learning followed by a live knowledge development and practical element. This training enables successful applicants to offer EFR Instructor courses, making it particularly beneficial to those working at Instructor Development Centres or those involved in the IDC process.EFR

In order to apply for a space you must meeting the following criteria:

  • Be an EFR Primary / Secondary Care Instructor
  • Be an EFR Care For Children Instructor
  • Have registered at least 25 EFR students

OR

  • Have conducted at least 5 separate EFR courses

RNLI Sea Survival Instructor Specialty course

This course, released in October 2016, was developed by the RNLI, with help from PADI, in response to an RNLI survey identifying the need for divers to keep themselves safer in the sea.RNLI

The course has been created and tested within the UK, however, is completely transferrable to other diving areas or countries.  With some of the more harsh conditions we face in the UK, Ireland and parts of Europe, this course will be of great benefit to anyone teaching or diving in this part of the world.

It would be great to see you at ScubaFest. If you are interested in any of the PADI events please download and complete the registration form.

 

 

Big Business for Prodivers Maldives

Divers who signed up to join the Noon Atoll full-day trip with Kuredu Prodivers hoped to see some ‘big-stuff action’ with the locally renowned shark spot, Orimas Thila, high on their agenda. They got rather more than they bargained for…Blue Whale

On their way back, whilst on their dhoni, crossing the channel between the Noon and Lhaviyani Atolls, something big was spotted in the water – or rather something massive!

Blue Whale

In fact, they witnessed the largest creature ever to have lived on Earth – a Blue Whale! Great excitement ensued and estimates of size range from ‘huge’, 12 metres and 18 metres. Blue whales can grow to over 33 metres in length and have a heart weighing as much as a car. Their huge mouth can fit 100 people inside but, fear not, we are not on their menu; Blue Whales are filter feeders and eat krill – shrimp-like invertebrates.

Blue Whales have been around on Earth for about 54 million years and were once prolific, but in the first half of the 20th century they were almost hunted to extinction. There are now an estimated total of 10.000 – 25,000 individuals left on the planet and the International Union for Conservation of Nature (IUCN) Red List rates them as ‘endangered’. While whaling is no longer a threat, increased shipping leading to more collisions, oil spills and climate change all threaten the existence of the majestic Blue Whales. Blue Whale

 The ocean is full of surprises and, as well as the usual exciting encounters of sharks and manta rays, as you can see, every now and then something a little more unusual and unexpected turns up.

prodivers logo