Life beneath the surface in the Maldives is an underwater Disneyland, perfect for dive enthusiasts. The Maldives is renowned as one of the very best diving locations in the world. There’s not only an abundance of reef life here but also spectacular coloured coral and crystal clear water.

Photo credit - Ruth Franklin

Photo credit – Nigel Wade


The Maldives ticks all of the boxes when it comes to diving holidays. This tropical location boasts visibility levels of up to 40 meters, making it a great destination for advanced divers. However diving in the Maldives is not just for the experienced. The shallow lagoons and channels make it the perfect location to try diving for the very first time. Plus what better destination in the world is there to gain your scuba-diving certifications?

Photo credit - Ruth Franklin

Photo credit – Renee Sorenson

The Maldives is also home to protected UNESCO Biosphere Reserves. The presence of currents in this island nation means that open water channels are perfect for drift diving and it’s also possible to swim with gentle ocean giants like manta rays and whale sharks. Don’t forget the Maldives has year round water temperatures of 26 – 29 degrees Celsius!


Fortunately, the diving season in the Maldives is open all year round with the calmest conditions from December through to June. As the Maldives is located in the tropics, it is susceptible to both wet and dry seasons. June to November is the south-west monsoon season, bringing with it with overcast and wet conditions, especially in June and July. During these months expect slightly less visibility and different currents, although there is still plenty of marine life on offer, as well as sunny spells. Generally reef life is more varied and visibility is better on the western side of any atoll from May to November and on the eastern side from December to April. Reef sharks, hammerheads and whale sharks are found in the Maldives year round, along with manta rays and sea turtles, you just need to know where to head at the time of year you plan to dive!

Photo credit - Ruth Franklin

Photo credit – Renee Sorenson


There are a number of diving options when it comes to Maldives. For example at Secret Paradise, value for money diving holidays and tours will be offered that you will remember for a lifetime. Enjoy an all-inclusive guesthouse stay and be transferred by boat to incredible nearby dive sites, the same sites that you would dive from a resort but at half the cost! Our diving holidays are an affordable alternative to a resort stay and also allow you the flexibility of island hopping or if your budget is larger, atoll hopping to benefit from the best dive locations during your time of travel.

Photo credit - Ruth Franklin

Photo credit – Renee Sorenson

Liveaboards are a popular dive holiday option, allowing you to scour the waters for the ultimate dive spot each day. These days most Liveaboards operate a year round schedule offering 7 night, 10 night and 14 night cruises not only in the central atolls but to the deep south and deep north offering opportunities to discover less dived sites and pristine coral.


 Secret Paradise, offers six diverse one island based diving packages, all in different atolls allowing you access to what are some of the best dive sites in the world. Our packages include Dharavandhoo, perfect if you want to encounter 100s of manta rays in Baa Atoll, Hulhumale if you need to stay close to the capital, Maafushi, South Male Atoll, Dhigurah home of the whale shark in Ari Atoll, Rasdhoo, the ideal location to spot a hammerhead and Gan in Laamu atoll.

Photo credit - Ruth Franklin

Photo credit – Boutique Beach

Our island hopping itineraries in Male Atoll and Ari Atoll allow you to discover a range of dive sites and marine life whilst at the same time experiencing Maldives local life, tradition and culture, with or without a private dive guide.


All partners of secret Paradise are PADI affiliated dive centers and are operated by both local and European dive professionals. A personal interest is taken in promoting scuba diving in the Maldives, through education and awareness about the underwater environment here. Their objective is to encourage underwater conservation and safe diving practices

Photo credit - Ruth Franklin

Photo credit – Nigel Wade

Dives are generally conducted from the beach within an island’s inner reef for beginners or from a local dive boat, a dhoni, for certified divers. Dive sites are chosen daily based on both the weather and current conditions as well as diver ability.

The teams will take you to the best dive spots and willingly introduce you to the characteristics of the underwater world of the Maldives. All offer boat dives, NITROX, night dives and a full range of PADI courses and will always ensure you get the best out of your dive. If you are learning to dive, you can do anything from completing a try dive or just the open water dive section of your PADI Open Water certification to completing the full PADI Open Water certification. Whatever you choose to do you can be assured of fun and safe diving with us and our partners.

Photo credit - Ruth Franklin

Photo credit – Nigel Wade

Secret Paradise Co-Founder, Ruth Franklin a diver herself with over 1500 dives in the Maldives is always happy to share her own diving experiences and is on hand for honest dive advice.

About Secret Paradise

Since 2012 Secret Paradise has been at the forefront of the Maldives local island tourism industry, promoting and supporting guesthouses, dive centres and activity operators based on locally inhabited islands throughout the Maldives archipelago. Offering group and private tours or independent travel packages, Secret Paradise holidays are designed to allow guests to engage with local people and experience the best from a paradise generally known as a luxury resort destination.

Responsible Tourism plays a very large part in what we do. We are mindful of ensuring we promote local tourism in line with Maldivian culture and beliefs and through education of both guests and locals we aim to protect the environment and limit where ever possible any negative impact to local life. We partner NGOs such as Save the Beach and marine charity organisations such as Maldives Whaleshark Research Program to provide opportunities for our guests to learn and support local conservation initiatives.

The benefit of travelling with us is that Secret Paradise guarantees you prompt and efficient personal service. We deliver high standards of service and professionalism and you can rely on Secret Paradise to provide expert local knowledge, clear communication and honest advice.

Customer Service

Because we are spending time and money to bring customers through our doors, we must offer excellent customer service!

And with all of the customer touch points out there and all of the channels consumers have for obtaining goods and services we need to step-up our game!

There is a new bar

Customers now have the expectation you’ll provide nothing less than exceptional customer service..!


“Your company is no longer being compared to just your competition. Your customers compare you to the great service they had at the restaurant they ate at last night – or any other company inside or outside of your industry that provided them with a good customer service experience.” Shep Hyken


Elements of Exceptional Customer Service Includes

  • A staff with a passion
  • Employees that have a smile (even on the phone)
  • A staff that have your customer’s interest at heart and understand your businesses culture

Great Customer Service is An Attitude!


Top 3 Customer Service tips

  1. Listening and confirming what has been said is key. People don’t care how much you know, they care about how much you care. Too often we’re not listening, we’re waiting to talk. When it is your time to talk be aware of your communication style and potential pitfalls (ummms, body language)

Remember that 55% is tone, 38% is body language, only 7% is words


  1. Using a positive language: it greatly affects how the customer HEARS your response

Example one –  “our ‘x’ language instructor can’t teach you and is unavailable at this time to answer your questions”

Example two – “our ‘x’ language instructor, who will be perfect to teach you this course, is available for you in two days time. Until then he/she can answer some of your question by email”

  1. Tenacity

Demonstrate to your customer you will do what it takes to deliver a product or service that meets their needs and wants.


Customers are people too, and knowing that putting in the extra effort will come back to you ten-fold.


Please contact your PADI Regional Manager if you wish to know more – or if you are interested in a Customer Service Training session.



PADI Continuing Education – Specialty Courses

Since you started diving, I´m sure you heard your Instructor saying, at least once a day, that it is important to continue your education. I´m sure you did – otherwise you would not have become a PADI Professional… But what is Continuing Education and why is it so important for yourself and the diving Industry in general? If you are familiar with the PADI system, you should know and understand that the continuing Education is the backbone of the PADI System.



Are you already a Specialty Instructor?

The Power of Continuing Education (CON-ED)

The power of the PADI system of diver education is its diversity in courses

  • From entry level all the way up to professional
  • All are standardized
  • Aim is to improve specific skills
  • Specialization improves the market value
  • Enough choices for everybody

It adds variety in teaching… Which means that you are not only stuck with the core course like the PADI Open Water Course, the PADI Advanced Open Water course or the PADI Rescue course. It connects in the same time to the interest of the student and improves the skills and therefore the safety of the divers.

Specialty courses can create different tracks to follow; For example it can add-on sales of diving equipment, or it will open a road to the PADI Master Scuba Diver certification.

It is essential that an Instructor in these days can offer various Specialty courses.

How many Specialty Certifications do you have?

What if I tell you that Specialties are the reason to become very successful in the diving industry? The more specialties you can teach and the more languages you can bring into a new position for a Dive Center – the more valuable you will become in the whole industry.

I can only highly recommend that you follow the Specialty Instructor Training! It will certainly build up your confidence and it will give you new insights. The more specialties you offer, the bigger your income can grow!


It shows to the Dive Center owner and to PADI that you understand the PADI philosophy – and together with the new Elite Instructor program – it will also be recognized by PADI.

How can you apply to become a PADI Specialty Instructor?

There are two ways to obtain the Specialty ratings:

  • The first is completing a PADI Specialty Instructor course with a PADI Course Director. This reduced the number of dives you must have – 10 versus 20 – showing experience in the specialty area.
  • If you already have the experience (min. 20 logged dives), you can apply directly to your PADI Regional Headquarters. You will find on the PADI Prosite the Specialty Instructor Application.

To summarize – If you offer a variety of courses – this will have a direct impact in your Dive Center.


Specialty certifications have a direct impact on equipment sales, because the courses are creating a demand for new equipment and it also triggers the lust for more adventure. At the end of the day you will have more satisfied customers and happier staff.

To push the PADI Continuing Education courses is the foundation for success! Because your Customers are always aiming for new experiences and challenges.

Check out the newest challenges for 2017

PADI Elite Instructor

2017 – MSD My PADI Challenge



Minor Mishaps and Maladies

Written by DAN staff

As a dive professional, you know that planning, preparation and careful decision-making are key risk management tools for preventing serious dive incidents and injuries during training. Because of this, the “worst” injuries most student divers face are often bumps and bruises that can be addressed quickly and easily. Knowing that minor mishaps do occur, it’s important to refresh your first-aid skills regularly, and be ready to deal with common problems. The following are a few maladies to consider and ways to handle them.

DAN_First Aid


Blisters and hotspots are annoying and detract from a diver’s ability to focus on learning. Left unattended, blisters can become serious problems if allowed to get worse or become infected. Whether they’re caused by equipment that doesn’t fit right or too much exposure on sensitive skin, address all hotspots and blisters before they become worse. Protect them from friction using moleskin or a thick bandage. In areas where it’s particularly difficult for a bandage to adhere, consider using a tincture of benzoin or another medical adhesive to keep the bandage in place. Avoid draining a blister if possible, but if a blister must be broken use a sanitized needle or a sharp blade to make a small incision near the bottom of the blisters edge, and keep the wound covered.

Infected Wounds

Any open wound can become infected and infections are of particular concern when divers travel. Student divers who are dealing with travel stress, a different diet, sweat, dirt and increased physical activity are more likely to have their wounds become infected, which puts a damper on a dive vacation. It’s important to keep an eye on all wounds and address them before they become serious concerns. Use the acronym SHARP (swelling, heat, aches/pains, redness, and pus) to identify wounds that need medical care. If signs of an infection appear, re-clean the wound, apply moist heat (as hot as the patient can tolerate) every four to six hours, and change the dressings multiple times per day.


Fiji10_682_OverheatDealing with the hot sun while distracted by dive equipment or preparations can lead to overheating (hyperthermia). Heat exhaustion is the result of a hot environment combined with insufficient hydration. Heat exhausted individuals often complain of headache, nausea, dizziness and display vomiting, profuse sweating, pale or flushed skin and disorientation. The condition is inconvenient and uncomfortable, but can be remedied with hydration and rest in a cool, shady spot. If the condition is allowed to progress however, it can become heat stroke, which is a real medical emergency. Heat stroke is the elevation of the body’s core temperature to greater than 40ºC/105ºF and immediate intervention is required. If a diver stops sweating, begins to have cramps or faints, seek medical attention immediately and aggressively cool the individual. Get exposure protection off and put ice packs at armpits, neck and groin. Fanning or directing cool air from a scuba cylinder over the diver are good steps to aid cooling, while evacuating the individual to professional medical care.

For more information on everyday first aid and safe diving practices, visit

Listen To Your Ears

Written by DAN Staff

In the first metre/three feet of a descent, your ears experience 10 percent greater pressure than they did at the surface. At two metres/six feet that percentage doubles, and at three metres/10 feet, there’s enough pressure differential to rupture ear drums, or burst blood vessels and draw fluid and blood into the inner ear.


Despite the fact that most ear injuries can be prevented, many divers seem to equalize their ears almost as an afterthought. Injury statistics show that ear issues are one of the leading causes of dive injuries. You can help reduce you student divers’ risk of an ear injury by firmly establishing the importance of equalization early in their training and continually reinforcing the need to equalize before any discomfort occurs.

Ear injuries can occur quickly, so take a moment to brush up on your ear injury knowledge to help improve your divers’ safety and comfort.

Middle Ear Barotrauma

A middle-ear barotrauma is a condition in which pressure in the tympanic cavity (air-filled space in the middle ear) is significantly lower than the pressure outside the ear. This results in a relative vacuum that causes the eardrum to bulge inward, ear tissue swells, and fluid and blood from ruptured vessels leak into the tympanic cavity. This can be caused by a failure to equalize or Eustachian tube obstruction on descent. Divers with middle ear barotrauma will generally report initial discomfort that may intensify to severe pain, and the feeling of clogged, or stuffy ears.

Perforated Eardrum

A rupture of the tympanic membrane (eardrum) is generally the result of a failure to equalize the middle ear, or too forceful a Valsalva maneuver. The condition often causes pain, although the rupture may relieve the feeling pressure on the ear, and vertigo may follow. Most perforations will heal naturally within a few weeks, although some cases may require surgical repair. Factors like congestion, inadequate training, and excessive descent rates can increase a diver’s risk of eardrum perforation.


Inner Ear Barotrauma

Similar to eardrum perforation, inner-ear barotrauma can be caused by a failure to equalize or an inappropriately aggressive Valsalva maneuver. A significant pressure differential between the external and middle ear can cause an outward bulging of the ear’s round window. This can cause inner ear injuries without a rupture. If the round window ruptures, the loss of fluid in the inner ear can damage the balance and hearing organs, and surgical repair may be required. Divers with inner ear barotrauma often experience severe vertigo, hearing loss, tinnitus (persistent noise in the ears), a feeling of fullness in their ear, and involuntary eye movements known as nystagmus.

Facial Baroparesis

In some individuals, increased pressure in the middle ear can stop circulation to a facial nerve resulting in facial baroparesis – paralysis of the facial nerve. This reversible condition can happen while flying or diving, and symptoms usually include numbness, tingling, weakness and facial paralysis. Facial droop can sometimes be seen and can cause concern, but facial baroparesis often resolves spontaneously. Divers who exhibit symptoms of facial baroparesis should seek medical attention to rule out other serious conditions.

For more information on ear injuries and safe diving practices, visit

PADI Store Wrapping

In my previous blogs I was talking about the importance to find a difference to your dive center colleagues, next door. As you know, PADI is offering to design your Shop windows, your walls in the Dive Center or your dive center cars. This is called PADI Store wrapping.




When you are interested in a Store or Wall Wrapping, you need to do the following:

  1. Contact your PADI Regional Manager
  2. Fill in the Application, which your PADI Regional Manager will provide to you. The PADI Marketing Department needs the following information from you:
  • How many Windows or Wall Wrapping – indicate the number
  • Decide what % of your store window should be covered
  • half window bottom
  • half window top
  • full window
  • Other

Measurements – provide the exact measurement of your windows or walls in width x height

Please supply any high resolution (300dpi) photographs or graphics that you want us to use and any logo’s you want to be included – also in high resolution


Theme – Which topic do you like to have in your wrapping?

  • Kids diving
  • Go Dive
  • Keep Diving
  • Go PRO
  • TecRec
  • Specialties
  • PADI Con-Ed Flowchart
  • Other

Imagery – please provide PADI with the kind of pictures you would like to add to the wrapping:

  • Warm Water
  • Cold Water
  • Pool



Text – Please provide this in both English and all other languages that you require the final artwork in:

ExampleGet your PADI at XZY Dive Center


  1. Send the Application, together with all the Photos and Logo attached – together with a Pictures from the location where you wish to have the wrapping – back to your PADI Regional Manager



When you are interested in a Car Wrapping, you need to do the following:

  1. Contact your PADI Regional Manager
  2. Fill in the Application, which your PADI Regional Manager will provide to you. The PADI Marketing Department needs the following information from you:

Provide the Marketing Department with the exact type of your car. The designer needs to get the Blue Print from your vehicle.

Please supply any high resolution (300dpi) photographs or graphics that you want us to use and any logo’s you want to be included – also in high resolution.

Theme – Which topic do you like to have in your wrapping?

  • Kids diving
  • Go Dive
  • Keep Diving
  • Go PRO
  • TecRec
  • Specialties
  • PADI Con-Ed Flowchart
  • Other

Imagery – please provide PADI with the kind of pictures you would like to add to the wrapping:

  • Warm Water
  • Cold Water
  • Pool


  1. Send the Application, together with all the Photos and Logo attached – together with a Pictures from the location where you wish to have the wrapping – back to your PADI Regional Manager


Important information

  • Measurement of windows, doors, walls etc. must be exact.


  • Please note that there is a minimum turnaround time of 45 days for a store wrap designs.


  • All photographs and graphics that are submitted must be in the correct resolution/format, otherwise they may not be included in the design.


  • The Dive Centre confirms that it has the right to publish the provided photographs and/or graphics and that it possesses the applicable Copyrights. The Dive Center confirms that PADI can use these photos. PADI shall have no responsibility for photographs or graphics that are not supplied from the PADI database.


  • Please note: No artwork creation will begin until all required information has been received.

Egyptian Divers of the future at Red Sea Diving Safari – Marsa Shagra !

In February 2017, Red Sea Diving Safari had a visit from 55 students and staff from the New Cairo British International School (NCBIS) in Marsa Shagra.

For students at the NCBIS, the last week in February means ‘challenge week’, where students get to choose from a variety of trips and experiences. With some students opting for skiing and others choosing Bali, these kids all opted to stay much closer to home in Marsa Alam.

In recent years, Red Sea Diving Safari has seen a sharp increase in the number of Egyptians taking up scuba diving and, more importantly, getting PADI certified. In 2015, 35% of entry level certified divers in Marsa Shagra were Egyptian, while in 2016 the number increased to 57%. So far in 2017, Egyptians have made up a quarter of Shagra’s entry level certified divers vs. 16% for the same period in 2016. The past few years have seen internal tourism to Marsa Alam boom due to increased internal marketing for the Red Sea as a destination as well as issues with currency exchange rates, which have made it expensive to travel abroad.

The students from NCBIS ranged from 11-18 years old with 36 students totally new to diving and starting their PADI journey with the Open Water Course, or Junior Open Water Course. The rest of the group opted for either the PADI Advanced Open Water Course or Enriched Air Diver course to continue their diving education. Students were divided into groups: Turtles, Dolphins, Nudibranches, Stingrays, Remoras, Clownfish, Octopus, Seahorses and Sharks, and then the fun began!

On the first day, students went through the process of getting their equipment. For some this was the first time they had tried on a mask or seen a BCD! Then it was off to Shagra’s restaurant for a group session to watch the PADI Open Water Course DVD.

All the students were immediately taken in by this new adventure and learning curve, whether it was something their parents had signed them up and sent them away for, or it was something they had heard about and dreamed of learning one day. They practiced assembling and dissembling equipment until it was second-nature and tackled the PADI Open Water Course skills one by one. Advanced Students opted for adventure dives including Fish Identification and Peak Performance Buoyancy alongside their compulsory Navigation and Deep dives.

Groups were coordinated to carry out different parts of the course to make sure each group had space to learn and do activities in an unrushed, constructive but fun learning environment. For the confined water activities, the different groups were divided between the local swimming pool and Marsa Shagra’s shallow sandy-bottomed bay, which is ideal for training.

Working through the skills, the students gradually became more and more comfortable underwater, with the help of Shagra’s dedicated instructors. While the Open Water students worked through their open water dives on the house reef, the Advanced Open Water students went to dive Marsa Egla, a local shore dive site, and explored the outer parts of Marsa Shagra’s vast house reef by zodiac.

By night, other activities were on offer, including a campfire on the beach and a guided Astro Tour at the Bawadi Bedouin café to learn about the night sky and take advantage of the unpolluted, clear skies of the Southern Red Sea.

On one evening, a team from HEPCA (Hurghada Environmental Protection and Conservation Agency) visited to conduct a workshop with the students, talking about their valuable activities in the region, including their new Red Sea Defender educational vessel. They then collected plankton from Marsa Shagra’s bay and examined their findings under the microscopes, giving them an insight into the science behind what they were seeing underwater and the importance of protecting the fragile environment.

On the final day students celebrated all their hard work and certifications with a trip into the desert close to Marsa Shagra, with sunset camel ride and traditional Bedouin dinner.

By the end of the week, it’s fair to say that students, teachers and the team at Marsa Shagra were exhausted but thanks to the hard work and dedication of everyone, many new divers were born and buzzing about what adventures their PADI certification will take them on in their future.

On behalf of PADI, congratulations to NCBIS students and staff! 

…. and special thanks Red Sea Diving Safari’s Team : keep up the good work!








Certificates – Greek Diving Legislation / Πιστοποιήσεις – Ελληνική Καταδυτική Νομοθεσία

(GREEK) English version below

Ελληνικές Πιστοποιήσεις για Δύτες

Η PADI εκδίδει Ελληνικά Πιστοποιητικά όπως απαιτείται από την Ελληνική Νομοθεσία.


Όταν ο δύτης χρειάζεται το Ελληνικό Πιστοποιητικό (π.χ. ώστε να γίνει επαγγελματίας δύτης), μπορεί να κάνει αίτηση για να το αποκτήσει.

Για να εκδοθεί ένα Ελληνικό Πιστοποιητικό ο δύτης πρέπει:

  • Να συμπληρώσει ένα έντυπο
  • Να στείλει μία ψηφιακή φωτογραφία

Πού μπορεί ο δύτης να βρει αυτό το έντυπο;

  • Στο Καταδυτικό του Κέντρο

Που μπορεί να βρει το Καταδυτικό Κέντρο το έντυπο και που πρέπει να το στείλει μαζί με τη φωτογραφία;

Ελληνικά Πιστοποιητικά για τους Επαγγελματίες της PADI

Η PADI εκδίδει το Ελληνικό Πιστοποιητικό για όλα τα επίπεδα Επαγγελματία. Είναι ένα από τα έγγραφα το οποίο ο Επαγγελματίας χρειάζεται να το καταθέσει στις Λιμενικές Αρχές για να εργαστεί.

Πώς λειτουργεί;

  • Το έντυπο αυτό είναι ένα από τα υποχρεωτικά έντυπα στο IDC
    • Στα Ελληνικά για τους Έλληνες
    • Στα Αγγλικά για τους τους ξένους
  • Οι Εκπαιδευτές Εκπαιδευτών (Course Directors) πρέπει να δίνουν αυτό το έντυπο για κάθε υποψήφιο στον Εξεταστή
  • Μετά την έγκριση της αίτησης στο γραφείο της PADI, η πιστοποίηση εκδίδεται και ταχυδρομείται στον Υποψήφιο.

Το έντυπο είναι διαθέσιμο εδώ: IEinfosheet2017


Εάν έχετε οποιαδήποτε ερώτηση σχετικά με την Ελληνική Καταδυτική Νομοθεσία μπορείτε να στείλετε τις ερωτήσεις σας στα Ελληνικά ή στα Αγγλικά στην ηλεκτρονική διεύθυνση

Σε αυτό το ηχογραφημένο webinar καλύπτουμε την Ελληνική Νομοθεσία που σχετίζεται με τα Καταδυτικά Κέντρα, τους Εκπαιδευτές και τους δύτες.​

Webinar στα ΑΓΓΛΙΚΑ – εγγραφή ΕΔΩ

Webinar στα ΕΛΛΗΝΙΚΑ – εγγραφή ΕΔΩ


(ENGLISH) Greek version above

Greek Certificates for Divers 

PADI issues Greek Certificates, as required by the Greek Diving Law. When a diver wants the Greek Certificate (e.g. in order to be a commercial diver), can apply for it..

In order to issue a Greek certificate the diver has to:

  • fill in a form
  • send a digital photo

Where the diver can find this form?

  • At his Dive Centre

Where the Dive Centre can find the form and where to send this form with the photo?

Greek Certificates for PADI Professionals

PADI issues the Greek Certificate for all the Professional Levels. It’s one of the documents that the Professional has to give to the Port Authorities in order to work.

How this works?

  • This document is one of the mandatory documents on the IDC
    • In Greek for Greeks
    • In English for non-Greeks
  • Course Directors have to give this form for each candidate to the Examiner
  • After approving the application at PADI office, the certificate will be issued and sent by post to the Candidate

The document is available here: IEinfosheet2017


If you have any questions on Greek Diving Legislation you can always ask it in English or Greek at

On this recorded webinar we cover Greek law related to the Dive Centers, Instructors and divers.

Webinar in ENGLISH – register HERE

Webinar in GREEK – register HERE

PADI IDC in Bulgaria – 2017


Търсите ли кариера в дайвинга? Искате ли да станете PADI Assistant Instructor или PADI Open Water Scuba Instuctor? Ако отговорът е ДА, то не пропускайте да се запишете на курса  PADI Assistant Instructor или програмата IDC (Instructor Development Course).  Тази година, през Август в България под ръководството на Курс Директор Стефан Марков ще се проведе пълен IDC.

В програмата на курса са включени:

16-17 Август – IDC Подготвителен курс

18-26 Август – Instructor Development Course (IDC): Курсът дава ясно определение на целите на обучението и философията на PADI и се състои от два компонента:

  1. Assistant Instructor Course (AI)
  2. Open Water SCUBA Instructor (OWSI)

27-28 Август – Emergency First Response Instructor Course (EFRI): Този курс Ви дава нужните знания и умения да преподавате курсовете EFR Primary Care и Secondary Care(До лекарска помощ).

КОГА: 16 – 28 Август 2017

КЪДЕ: гр. Царево, Бургаска Област


Стефан Марков

Course Director PADI 624668

Mob/Viber: +359 898 670 602                                                                                                                                             


Are you looking for a career in diving? Want to become a PADI Assistant Instructor or PADI Open Water Scuba Instuctor? If the answer is yes, do not forget to sign for PADI Assistant Instructor course or the program IDC (Instructor Development Course). This year in August in Bulgaria under the guidance of course Director Stefan Markov will hold complete IDC.

The program of the course includes:

16 17 August –  IDC Preparation Course

18 – 26 August – Instructor Development Course (IDC): The course provides a clear definition of the objectives of education and philosophy of PADI and consists of two components:

  1. Assistant Instructor Course (AI)
  2. Open Water SCUBA Instructor (OWSI)
    27 28 August – Emergency First Response Instructor Course (EFRI): This course gives you the knowledge and skills to teach courses EFR Primary Care and Secondary Care (to a doctor).

WHEN: 16 – August 28, 2017

WHERE: g. Tsarevo, Burgas Province


Stefan Markov

Course Director PADI 624668

Mob/Viber: +359 898 670 602

Project AWARE – Dive against Debris in the Canaries and Switzerland

The 4th of March 2017 – was a great day for Project AWARE in the Canary Islands and Switzerland! Two Key Accounts in my Regions organised on the same day a Project AWARE Dive against Debris with outstanding results!



Dive against Debris Crew Tenerife

One Project AWARE Dive Against Debris event happened in Tenerife in the Canary Islands and has been organised by the Big Fish Dive Center in Los Cristianos. The other event has been organised by Adventure Sports and the Dive Club from Frauenfeld & Eschenz in Switzerland.
Both Events were organised almost similar. The Event from Adventure Sports in Switzerland started the evening before with the orientation for the Project AWARE Dive against Debris course – while the event in Tenerife started in the morning of the 4th of March.

It was amazing to see how passionate the participants were involved to clean the Beach underwater in Playas las vistas In Tenerife and in the “Untersee” in Steckborn. Even more impressive was the amount of rubbish who has been removed from the Atlantic and from the Lake of Constance.

Big Fish Tenerife

Data collected:
Divers collected the following amount in Tenerife;
66 KG 





Divecorner Frauenfeld



Divers collected the following amount in Steckborn;
259 KG 



A big Thank you goes to the organizers in both Countries. Thank you Michal Motylewski and Sandro Krawinkler!

The world and our environment needs more people like you! You are an inspiration for all of us and I hope that with your example we can make a difference and animate more Dive Centres, Divers and citizens of both regions to protect our beloved environment!





Dive against Debris Crew Steckborn

How can you help to protect the ocean?

Dive Against Debris is a global marine debris survey – the only data collection effort of its kind that involves volunteer divers collecting, recording and reporting data on marine debris found on the seafloor. Marine debris is a problem that is often considered ‘out of sight – out of mind.’ By sharing data on the debris we find underwater, we’re able to contribute the underwater perspective. It’s really exciting – divers can have a powerful role to play in helping contribute data to influence marine debris policy.
So how can you get started?

1. Download our Dive Against Debris Survey Toolkit – here you’ll find the survey kit for your divers, including a certificate to award to your volunteers.
2. Add your action to our Event Map. Create your My Ocean profile and add your action to our interactive map for our dive community to see. You can also blog and upload photos or videos in My Ocean.

. Promote over social media, through your network and communications – don’t forget to use the following hashtags #ProjectAWARE, #DiveAgainstDebris, #MarineDebris, etc.
4. Report your data. Data is critical. Don’t let your dives go to waste. Make sure you report the data on the litter you found.
5. Share the data with your divers by showing them the Dive Against Debris Map.

Project AWARE ® can offer you mesh bags and a banner to advertise your action during the day. Each mesh bag comes with a donation of € 6.00. This way, Project AWARE is able to send you some other promotional materials to use during your action (leaflets, posters, stickers, badges, etc.).
Adopt a Dive Site™ is a campaign where Project AWARE launched last year on Earth Day, which basically is repeated Dive Against Debris surveys in one dive site: Project AWARE requires divers adopting a specific dive site to clean up and report data at least once a month. You can find all information on the website and if you are interested, just sign up on the website.

Start your Ocean protection today, sign up with adopt a dive site and take an example of the two Dive Centres in Switzerland and in the Canaries! Together we can make a difference and educate the coming generations!

I still believe in us humans and that we can change the current situation, but the time is ticking… Our beautiful environment is counting on you!
#myOcean #myHope