Developing a Diving Destination of Excellence

Let´s talk about how to develop a diving destination of excellence. One of my many duties as a PADI Regional Manager is to help the dive industry grow in the particular Region I manage. As a PADI Regional Manager, I´m responsible for Cyprus, the Canary Islands and Switzerland. This time – I would like to have a closer look how to develop Cyprus and how to bring Cyprus on the map as a diving destination of excellence.

What is a diving destination of excellence?

Diving is classified as adventure tourism – and the definition of excellence is measured by the image of the destination itself by the tourists themselves.

I´m sure you heard about the Zenobia Wreck, which sunk on the 7th of June 1980. The Zenobia lays now at roughly 42m and about 1.5km offshore in front of the marina in Larnaca.

In order to be classified as an excellent destination the Zenobia must fulfil both short term and long term criteria.

Short term view:
Ability to fulfil divers expectation: The diver must be immediately satisfied.

Long term view:

  • The value generated by diver tourism must be shared between all involved parties
  •  Preserve the dive sites: marine conservation
  • Must comply with the ethical principles recognized by international law

The Zenobia has long been classified as one of the top ten wrecks in the world. We can look at past wreck specialty certifications from 2004 – 2014.

As you can see the number of these certifications has remained vastly the same over this period. This illustrates that we have maintained this dive destinations’ global rating, but also shows us the opportunity for growth. The Zenobia already generates 25 million euros per annum in dive tourist revenue. Promoting the Zenobia in the right way will ensure a steady and sustainable growth of revenue, and dive-tourism Island wide will also benefit. This niche in adventure tourism will put Cyprus on the destination of excellence map for reasons that go beyond that of the “cleanest beaches of Europe” and with the right market strategy we could also get the on the top dive destinations of Europe too.

How do we do this?

Cooperation, cooperation, cooperation!!

Official bodies like the CTO, the CDCA and all dive operations must have the same goal and we must, above all work together. Competition should be seen as a challenge to raise the overall standard of this beautiful island as a dive destination. The Zenobia and the purposefully sunk wrecks all form artificial reefs that boost fish stocks and get some more life into the Mediterranean. Improved fishery Laws and enforced marine parks will all help generate dive tourism by making our sea more alive, more beautiful and therefor more interesting. PADI is here to support you, organizations such as Project AWARE have the sole aim to improve the ecology of the world’s oceans, and it offers support to regional areas to allow this improvement to happen in a sustainable way. Improvements must have long term goals to ensure divers are both immediately satisfied, but also want to return year after year. Sustainable growth through quality will ensure quantity with continuously grow. We have been doing a fine job……now let’s strive for excellence.

How does dive tourism affect island wide tourism?

Divers who are attracted to Cyprus as a dive destination will most likely be travelling with non-diving companions or family. These non-divers also have satisfaction criteria that must be met by the island. This naturally generates growth of Tourism Island wide, by the normal avenues of tourism – such as hotels, restaurants, attractions and activities outside of the diving realm. The beauty of the islands marine environments may even generate a growth in entry level certifications and diving, especially when the dive sites are in the caliber of the Zenobia. Diving is, as we all know, highly addictive. This enthusiasm is contagious. Marketing and promotion in the right way will ensure that this enthusiasm is transformed into new diver acquisition and an every improving revenue in the dive tourism sector.  It’s a circle of benefits that feed each other. Let’s keep the keep the wheel turning!

Future trends

Seeing as diver numbers for wreck specialties have remained fairly constant over the last decade we can see that growth needs come both from successful marketing of the current dive attractions and the development of ever more niche markets within diving. The ever increasing interest of side mount and technical diving allows ever new avenues of diving opportunities to be explored and profited from. By maintaining high standards, variation and cooperation within the industry we can ensure future trends are positively advantageous to tourism as a whole.

Let´s work together and bring more divers to the beautiful island in the eastern Mediterranean.

 

Minor Mishaps and Maladies

Written by DAN staff

As a dive professional, you know that planning, preparation and careful decision-making are key risk management tools for preventing serious dive incidents and injuries during training. Because of this, the “worst” injuries most student divers face are often bumps and bruises that can be addressed quickly and easily. Knowing that minor mishaps do occur, it’s important to refresh your first-aid skills regularly, and be ready to deal with common problems. The following are a few maladies to consider and ways to handle them.

DAN_First Aid

Blisters

Blisters and hotspots are annoying and detract from a diver’s ability to focus on learning. Left unattended, blisters can become serious problems if allowed to get worse or become infected. Whether they’re caused by equipment that doesn’t fit right or too much exposure on sensitive skin, address all hotspots and blisters before they become worse. Protect them from friction using moleskin or a thick bandage. In areas where it’s particularly difficult for a bandage to adhere, consider using a tincture of benzoin or another medical adhesive to keep the bandage in place. Avoid draining a blister if possible, but if a blister must be broken use a sanitized needle or a sharp blade to make a small incision near the bottom of the blisters edge, and keep the wound covered.

Infected Wounds

Any open wound can become infected and infections are of particular concern when divers travel. Student divers who are dealing with travel stress, a different diet, sweat, dirt and increased physical activity are more likely to have their wounds become infected, which puts a damper on a dive vacation. It’s important to keep an eye on all wounds and address them before they become serious concerns. Use the acronym SHARP (swelling, heat, aches/pains, redness, and pus) to identify wounds that need medical care. If signs of an infection appear, re-clean the wound, apply moist heat (as hot as the patient can tolerate) every four to six hours, and change the dressings multiple times per day.

Hyperthermia

Fiji10_682_OverheatDealing with the hot sun while distracted by dive equipment or preparations can lead to overheating (hyperthermia). Heat exhaustion is the result of a hot environment combined with insufficient hydration. Heat exhausted individuals often complain of headache, nausea, dizziness and display vomiting, profuse sweating, pale or flushed skin and disorientation. The condition is inconvenient and uncomfortable, but can be remedied with hydration and rest in a cool, shady spot. If the condition is allowed to progress however, it can become heat stroke, which is a real medical emergency. Heat stroke is the elevation of the body’s core temperature to greater than 40ºC/105ºF and immediate intervention is required. If a diver stops sweating, begins to have cramps or faints, seek medical attention immediately and aggressively cool the individual. Get exposure protection off and put ice packs at armpits, neck and groin. Fanning or directing cool air from a scuba cylinder over the diver are good steps to aid cooling, while evacuating the individual to professional medical care.

For more information on everyday first aid and safe diving practices, visit DAN.org/health

Andrea Zuccari and Freediving World join the PADI Freediving Family!

PADI is happy to announce the registration of the first PADI Freediving Center in Sharm El Sheikh, Freediving World Apnea Center!

We are also particularly proud to have the center’s owner Andrea Zuccari, multiple Freediving Record Holder and PADI Freediver Instructor Trainer on-board the PADI freediving family.

Let’s start with Freediving World Apnea Center

Freediving World meets PADI Freedivers needs at all levels all the way from beginner to instructor level. The center is equipped with a 25m swimming pool, platforms which are fitted with counterweight systems as well as several buoys/lines reaching different depths, a perfect set-up for freediving courses, group training sessions and workshops.

…and now, let’s talk about Andrea


  • 3 Italian National Records in Variable Weight (VWT) and No Limit (NLT)
  • 10 Swiss National Records in CWT, CNF and FIM
  • 2 No-Limits Tandem Word Records
  • In 2014 Andrea becomes the deepest man in the world using a Freediving Mask with 175m in No Limits

 

 

Andrea is currently training to reach the “no packing” target in “TheDeepDiveProject”. Stay tuned and follow Andrea on Social Media for the latest news and information about “TheDeepDiveProject”.

Records:

2007                                                                                                                                      51m: Constant Weight Without Fins (CNF) – Swiss Record

2008                                                                                                                                      71m: Free Immersion (FIM) – Swiss Record
71m: Constant Weight (CWT) – Swiss Record

2009
55m:
Constant Weight Without Fins (CNF) – Swiss Record
75m: Free Immersion (FIM) – Swiss Record
77m: Constant Weight (CWT) – Swiss Record
120m: No Limit (NLT) – Swiss Record

2011
125m:
No Limit (NLT) Tandem with Anna Von Boetticher  –  World Record

2012                                                                                                                                      131m: No Limit (NLT) – Swiss Record

2013
126m:
No Limit (NLT) Tandem with con Stavrow Kastrinakis – World Record
135m: Variable Weight (VWT) – Italian Record
155m: No Limit (NLT) – Italian Record

2014
175m:
No Limit (NLT) – Italian Record (second deepest man in the world)

 

 

In Depth: Dive Against Debris Specialty

Many divers are taking action to help fight marine debris. Teaching the Dive Against Debris® Distinctive Specialty is a great way to encourage your students to comprehend the global threat of marine debris and take meaningful steps to protect our oceans.

Who can teach Dive Against Debris®?
All renewed PADI instructors can apply to teach the Project AWARE®’s Dive Against Debris® Distinctive Specialty after completing a Dive Against Debris® Distinctive Specialty Instructor Course with a PADI Course Director, or by direct application.                                                                        

What do I need to be able to teach Dive Against Debris®?
You will need the Dive Against Debris® Instructor Guide and the Dive Against Debris® Specialty Course toolkit.

How can I link this with other courses?

The revised and updated PADI Advanced Open Water Diver course gives your students the chance to experience a Dive Against Debris® Adventure Dive – if you’re certified as an instructor in the specialty, and the student diver meets the specialty prerequisites.

If you conduct your PADI Open Water Diver course open water dives over 2 days, you may consider adding the Dive Against Debris® Distinctive Specialty as an optional dive once your students have completed their final PADI Open Water Diver Course dive.

Dive centres with a dive club, can offer the Dive Against Debris® course to club members, so they can collect debris and record their data, which may not already be monitored.

Also make sure you ask your students to choose a Project AWARE version of their PADI certification card to support a clean and healthy ocean.

 Schools and youth groups
The Dive Against Debris® course is a great opportunity to promote scuba diving to local schools and youth groups. School children will learn about the PADI Open Water Diver course, which covers various curriculum subjects including physics and physiology, and also about global conservation whilst having the opportunity to contribute to marine debris citizen science by logging their data on the Project AWARE website.

If you are not already registered as a PADI Approved Youth Centre (available for UK dive centres only) download the PADI Approved Youth Centre information pack. Send your completed PADI Approved Youth Training Centre application (located in the Appendix of the PADI Approved Youth Centre information pack) to your Regional Training Consultant su-li.wong@padi.com or emily.petley-jones@padi.com.

 

Take part in the third annual PADI Women’s Dive Day on Saturday, 15 July 2017

For the past two years, divers from every corner of the globe have come together for PADI Women’s Dive Day to bond over their love of the ocean and a passion for diving. This growing tradition will continue on 15 July 2017, further strengthening and supporting the female dive community through a day of fun, adventure and camaraderie.

PADI Dive Centers and Resorts hosted more than 700 events in 77 countries last year for the second annual PADI Women’s Dive Day on 16 July 2016. Since the 2015 inaugural event, the celebration has continued to gain momentum as new and experienced divers gear up for everything from high tea on the high seas to shark dives and underwater cleanups. As a result, PADI female certifications increased noticeably in both 2015 and 2016, narrowing the gender gap in diving.

This was possible thanks to the enthusiasm and participation from PADI Members around the world who got behind this initiative. Let’s do it again, only bigger. More new divers. More ambassadors for the underwater world.

Participate in PADI Women’s Dive Day 2017 to strengthen and grow the female dive community, attract new women to the sports of scuba diving and freediving, and motivate existing female divers to get back in the water and continue their dive training.

Start planning your 2017 PADI Women’s Dive Day event on 15 July 2017 using these simple steps.

1. Decide what type of event to host. The type of event to host is completely up to you! Whether you conduct PADI Women’s Dive Day themed courses, have a family-oriented open day, host fun dives or even a girls’ night out with your divers, only your imagination limits your event.

2. PADI Retail and Resort Members, register your event on the PADI Women’s Dive Day Event Locator. By registering your event, your dive center/resort will be included on the Event Locator at padi.com/women-dive.  To register your event, ensure you are logged into the Pros’ Site with your PADI Dive Center or Resort account (not an Individual Member account), go to ‘My Account’ page of the PADI Pros’ Site, and click on ‘Register your Women’s Dive Day event(s)’. Follow the on-screen instructions to quickly and easily add your event.

3. PADI Professionals hosting an event not affiliated with a dive center/resort are encouraged to share their event information with their regional PADI office (PADI Americas: womendive@padi.com; PADI Asia Pacific: marketing@padi.com.au; PADI EMEA: marketing.emea@padi.com).

4. Promote your event. Use different platforms to help get the word out about your event – email, social media, advertisements (print, online and in-store), and event calendars. Visit the PADI Pros’ Site Women in Diving page to download customizable PADI Women’s Dive Day marketing materials. Tag your Twitter posts with #padiwomen to have your news shared in the Twitter Feed on padi.com/women-dive.

5. Post Event Follow-Up. Follow up with all your PADI Women’s Dive Day event participants afterward. A simple “thanks for being with us” keeps divers engaged and encourages them to continue diving with you. Don’t forget to include links, telephone and a call to action. And be sure your success stories and photos with the marketing team at your PADI Regional Headquarters! Tag event photos that you post on social media with #padiwomen to feed into PADI’s social channels.

PADI Retail and Resort Members: Register your 2017 PADI Women’s Dive Day event now! 

 

Dive Into the World of Professional Freediving – Become a PADI Freediver Instructor

PADIHas freediving cast its spell on you, holding you in its net of wonder forever? Are you ready to challenge yourself and take your freediving to another level? You want to move away from recreational freediving and dive into the world of professional freediving?

Becoming a PADI Freediver Instructor will be your passport into the world of professional freediving; teaching others to redefine their limits by experiencing ultimate freedom beneath the surface.

Becoming a PADI Freediver Instructor is not only a question of acquiring the necessary knowledge and understanding but also of achieving exceptional skill and endurance levels that allows you to safely and comfortably demonstrate to your students how to perform dives.

In order to enrol on the PADI Freediver Instructor course you must be physically and mentally prepared for a minimum of four days of classroom and inwater sessions.

There are three Instructor-level certifications for PADI Freedivers.

  1. PADI Freediver Instructor: You are authorised to teach PADI Freediver and Basic Freediver.
  2. PADI Advanced Freediver Instructor:  You can teach all diver levels through to PADI Advanced Freediver.
  3. PADI Master Freediver Instructor: You can teach all diver levels including PADI Master Freediver.

There are two paths to earning the PADI Freediver Instructor rating. The first is for experienced freedivers who gain instructional skills by attending a PADI Freediver Instructor Training Course. The second path is for current freediver instructors who want to join the PADI organisation by attending a PADI Freediver Instructor Orientation.

Note that PADI Open Water Scuba Instructors (or higher rating) who are also experienced freedivers and have a PADI Advanced Freediver certification may apply directly for the rating by submitting a PADI Freediver Instructor Application to your PADI Regional Headquarters.

There really is something about this sport that takes people under its spell…we will leave it to you to teach others to discover it for themselves.

If you’d like further information on how to become a PADI Freediver Instructor, please contact our Training Department

 

Are you part of the PADI Freediver Movement?

PADI is excited to market freediving to the EMEA territory – Jump on board to be a part of this PADI Dive Center business development opportunity.

Freediving is a life changing experience. For all who venture underwater on one breath. For the younger audience, looking for a newly emerging, boundary pushing sport or for those with more years behind them and a desire to find a less materialistic hobby, that compliments a desire to get back in touch with themselves and the purer values in life, the feedback tends to be consistent. The intrinsic challenges of freediving, coupled with the discipline and control that come with it, tend to bring an unparalleled sense of power and freedom. This sport can uncover new and profound dimensions of a person’s personality and has people reconsidering what they thought they knew of themselves and the world. It is a sport that leaves people in awe of the extraordinariness of their own bodies and the beauty of the underwater world. And PADI wants to bring all that Freediving has to offer to the wider world.

PADI is excited to unveil its plans to market Freediving to the EMEA territory. PADI EMEA has developed a series of marketing tactics to inspire and incite potential freedivers all over our territory.

With marketing efforts ranging from a beautiful multilingual landing page  to printed media adverts and online advertising and messaging across powerful and influential social media platforms, the PADI Office is committing resources to supporting freediving growth throughout the territory. But perhaps most beautifully, PADI has teamed up with freediving legend Forrest Simon to create this stunning video that says it all.

As we target key audiences across EMEA, PADI is reaching out to current PADI Freediver Centers to join this movement. Marketing efforts are in place to capture and drive audiences to PADI Freediver Centers. Whether you are part of an existing PADI Freediver Center, or are wanting to register one, PADI will help you make the most of this new movement.

How to become a PADI Freediver Center

To become a PADI Freediver Center, download, fill out and return the application form to customerservices.emea@padi.com. To add the PADI Freediver Center rating to your current listing and take advantage of these marketing efforts, the cost is £160.75 + VAT (€216.25 + VAT or CHF 233.25).

PADI Freediver Center Application

PADI Freediver Classification and Membership Standards

For more information, please don’t hesitate to contact your Regional Training Consultant or Regional Manager.

 

 

Why Become a PADI Five Star Dive Center?

 Discover the exclusive benefits you could enjoy by becoming a PADI Five Star Dive Center and how these will help grow your diving business!

 What are the benefits of becoming a PADI Five Star Dive Center?

As the year has already well and truly started, it is time to look ahead to the coming months and think about what you want to achieve. Analysing how you did each year and setting goals for growth is a key part of every successful business.

PADI Five Star membership is awarded, on an annual basis, to progressive PADI dive centers that provide a full range of PADI diver education programs, equipment selection and experience opportunities, while actively promoting aquatic environmental awareness.

These businesses excel in providing quality services to divers, present a professional image and actively promote the benefits of recreational scuba diving, snorkelling, dive travel, and environmental protection. PADI Five Star Dive Centers embrace the PADI system of diver education and offer regular continuing education programs to ensure divers have the opportunity to advance their skills and knowledge. These dive businesses are active in the community and are committed to providing customer satisfaction along with great dive experiences.

But why become a PADI Five Star Dive Center?

  • As a PADI Five Star Dive Center you receive exclusive benefits including:
  • An additional 10% off your usual purchasing level
  • Premier listing (high visibility) on the Dive Shop Locator
  • Authorisation to conduct PADI Assistant Instructor courses
  • Specially-designed, gold certification cards for your students, distinguishing your business as a superior PADI Dive Center
  • £100 credit for Facebook Advertising, put in place by one of our dedicated Marketing team
  • One e-Marketing consultation (visit or online) with our e-Marketing Specialist to review your digital marketing strategy
  • Website reviews to analyse and improve your SEO (Search Engine Optimisation)
  • PADI Marketing Toolkit to update your PADI Five Star Dive Center with the latest flags and posters
  • Regular, exclusive sales offers reserved for PADI Five Star Dive Centers

Ready to take the plunge?

Contact your PADI Regional Manager today for more information on how to apply to become a PADI Five Star Dive Center!

 

PADI’s World-Class Business Support and Service Results in Record Membership Numbers

More dive centers and resorts joined PADI in 2016 than any other year. Hear why so many chose PADI…

29Mar17_bebestbepadi_02

When dive businesses consider joining the PADI® family, they discover a variety of benefits including the ability to increase course profit, leverage best-in-class business support, and access unparalleled customer service. Combined with the power of the PADI brand bolstered by 50 years of dive training excellence, plus a dedication to aquatic conservation and advocacy, and it’s easy to see why so many dive centers and resorts choose PADI for long-term business success. In fact, more dive centers and resorts joined PADI in 2016 than any other year, with retail and resort membership now exceeding 6400 members globally.

PADI Dive Centers and Resorts use the PADI System of diver education to offer quality educational programs and dive experiences. What results is that when customers visit PADI’s Dive Shop Locator, the stores they see are authorized PADI facilities and not just pins on a map.

Jim Copeland of Copeland’s, Inc., a PADI Dive Center in Corpus Christi, Texas, USA, switched his store to PADI from another training agency. “I was pleased with PADI’s high training standards; I haven’t trained so hard since I first started my dive shop in 1958!” he says about PADI’s onboarding process. “It was a very difficult decision to cross over to PADI, but I don’t regret it. Everyone at PADI has been awesome, especially our PADI Regional Training Consultant, Kristina Leadbeater – she is absolutely priceless.”

PADI’s exemplary customer service is a member benefit that receives continuous accolades. Ian Sutherland of 3 Fathoms Scuba, Ltd., a PADI Dive Center in Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada, echoes Copeland’s praise for the PADI team. “I’ve never had a single complaint with PADI’s customer service in the two years since I joined,” he says. Having joined PADI after leaving another training agency, Sutherland is particularly appreciative of the organization’s responsiveness to his needs and the close communication maintained with him. “Debbie Parker, my Certifications Coordinator, is absolutely exemplary in the way she deals with members!” he adds.

“PADI has always considered outstanding customer service paramount,” says Drew Richardson, PADI Worldwide President and Chief Executive Officer. “In a time where other businesses appear to be cutting back on customer service, PADI Regional Headquarters are expanding to deliver prescriptive business support tailored to meet members’ needs. For example, PADI’s Regional Business Support Teams include a Territory Director, who is focused on the needs of a specific geographical area, plus a dedicated Regional Manager and Regional Training Consultant. Together, this team delivers proven diver acquisition and retention tools customized for each market to provide prescriptive business support to PADI Dive Centers and Resorts.” Each PADI Regional Business Support Team also includes a Marketing Consultant and Customer Relations staff member. Together, the teams strive to deliver turnkey business solutions and concierge-level support to PADI Members.

Profitability is always on every dive business owner’s mind, which is why PADI dedicates extensive resources to developing business education programs. Many of these programs are free to PADI Members, including a wide offering of Business of Diving webinars, both live and recorded at the PADI Pros’ Site. For more in-depth business training, members turn to PADI Business Academy. “I’ve attended four PADI Business Academy programs,” says Matt Bolton, General Manager of Crystal Dive Resort in Koh Tao, Thailand. “The PADI team does an absolutely fantastic job – organized, informative, and fun, combined with lots of member-focused, one-on-one consultations.”

So, what does unparalleled training standards, superior customer service and in-depth business support result in? According to Copeland, it’s higher profits. “We definitely make more money with PADI!” he says.

Be Best. Be PADI – The Way the World Learns to Dive®

Listen To Your Ears

Written by DAN Staff

In the first metre/three feet of a descent, your ears experience 10 percent greater pressure than they did at the surface. At two metres/six feet that percentage doubles, and at three metres/10 feet, there’s enough pressure differential to rupture ear drums, or burst blood vessels and draw fluid and blood into the inner ear.

BonaireOW0213__0757_Equalize

Despite the fact that most ear injuries can be prevented, many divers seem to equalize their ears almost as an afterthought. Injury statistics show that ear issues are one of the leading causes of dive injuries. You can help reduce you student divers’ risk of an ear injury by firmly establishing the importance of equalization early in their training and continually reinforcing the need to equalize before any discomfort occurs.

Ear injuries can occur quickly, so take a moment to brush up on your ear injury knowledge to help improve your divers’ safety and comfort.

Middle Ear Barotrauma

A middle-ear barotrauma is a condition in which pressure in the tympanic cavity (air-filled space in the middle ear) is significantly lower than the pressure outside the ear. This results in a relative vacuum that causes the eardrum to bulge inward, ear tissue swells, and fluid and blood from ruptured vessels leak into the tympanic cavity. This can be caused by a failure to equalize or Eustachian tube obstruction on descent. Divers with middle ear barotrauma will generally report initial discomfort that may intensify to severe pain, and the feeling of clogged, or stuffy ears.

Perforated Eardrum

A rupture of the tympanic membrane (eardrum) is generally the result of a failure to equalize the middle ear, or too forceful a Valsalva maneuver. The condition often causes pain, although the rupture may relieve the feeling pressure on the ear, and vertigo may follow. Most perforations will heal naturally within a few weeks, although some cases may require surgical repair. Factors like congestion, inadequate training, and excessive descent rates can increase a diver’s risk of eardrum perforation.

 

Inner Ear Barotrauma

Similar to eardrum perforation, inner-ear barotrauma can be caused by a failure to equalize or an inappropriately aggressive Valsalva maneuver. A significant pressure differential between the external and middle ear can cause an outward bulging of the ear’s round window. This can cause inner ear injuries without a rupture. If the round window ruptures, the loss of fluid in the inner ear can damage the balance and hearing organs, and surgical repair may be required. Divers with inner ear barotrauma often experience severe vertigo, hearing loss, tinnitus (persistent noise in the ears), a feeling of fullness in their ear, and involuntary eye movements known as nystagmus.

Facial Baroparesis

In some individuals, increased pressure in the middle ear can stop circulation to a facial nerve resulting in facial baroparesis – paralysis of the facial nerve. This reversible condition can happen while flying or diving, and symptoms usually include numbness, tingling, weakness and facial paralysis. Facial droop can sometimes be seen and can cause concern, but facial baroparesis often resolves spontaneously. Divers who exhibit symptoms of facial baroparesis should seek medical attention to rule out other serious conditions.

For more information on ear injuries and safe diving practices, visit DAN.org