GDPR – New Privacy Regulations in the Old World

 

You have likely heard that the European Union General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR) is here. But do you know what it is, what it means and who it applies to? Here’s an overview.

 What is the General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR)?

The GDPR legislation replaces the 1995 Data Protection Directive and was designed to unify data protection laws across the European Union while providing greater data control and protection for European Union citizens.

Why was it brought into force?

Today’s world revolves around data and it is dramatically different from the world in which the 1995 directive was developed. Many of the original provisions are valid and remain, but the increasing number of privacy and data breaches have made it imperative to update this policy for a number of reasons – including the need to protect European Union citizens.

How is GDPR different from the 1995 Data Protection Directive?

Who does it apply to?

  • GDPR primarily applies to businesses established in the European Union but it also applies to businesses based outside European Union that offer goods or services to European Union residents or collect data about European Union residents (Article 2 – Material Scope and Article 3 – Territorial Scope)

What does compliance mean?

  • Because of the complexity of this legislation, full compliance requirements will vary. Please seek information from an appropriately qualified source such as your professional or legal counsel.

When does compliance enforcement begin?

  • 25 May 2018

Is there a grace period?

  • The European Parliament approved GDPR in April 2016 and it was officially published in May 2016. There is no grace period.

Where can I go for more information?

Sources:

 

Disclaimer

The materials in this post do not constitute legal advice and others and are provided for general information purposes only. It is recommended that you contact your general or legal counsel.

 

The Heat Is On: Sea Turtles Are Becoming Mostly Female Due To The Earth’s Warming Climate

Some of the more charismatic inhabitants of the reef here at Gili Lankanfushi are the Turtles, and we do our best to help them thrive.

In fact, our resident Hawksbill Turtle, the aptly named ‘Gili’, was initially found here in critical condition, but was rescued by our marine biology team who sent her straight to the Four Seasons Rehabilitation Centre for recovery. Of all the threats posed to these animals; poaching, entanglement in fishing gear, plastic and other marine debris, and ocean pollution – There is one issue you may not be aware of: Climate change is turning Sea Turtles female.

As reported by Sarah Kaplan for The Washington post, scientists in the 1980s accidently discovered that temperature can determine the sex of Turtles. The team were attempting to aid a population of sea Turtles by rescuing eggs from vulnerable beaches and keeping them warm in incubators until they were ready to hatch. To their surprise almost all the hatchlings were male. What these scientists observed was “Temperature-dependent sex determination (TSD)”, a phenomenon that occurs only in reptiles (and some fish).

At what biologists call the ‘pivot temperature’ (roughly 29oC for Green Turtles), nests will produce equal amounts of males and females. A little warmer and embryos develop as females, but keep the eggs just a few degrees cooler (like the scientists did with their incubators) and they’ll come out mostly male.

Turtles tend to target their breeding periods to times when the sand is slightly warmer than their pivot temperatures, resulting in populations moderately skewed towards female, but a recent study conducted around Australia’s Great Barrier Reef found that the populations are becoming more than moderately skewed. On the warmer nesting sites 99.1% of juvenile Green Turtles were female, as were 86.8% of adults, suggesting that there has been a shift in gender ratios over the last few decades.

Scientific evidence for warming of the climate system is unequivocal
-Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change

Global warming is rapidly emerging as a universal threat to ecological integrity and function, say scientists studying coral reef assemblages. In species with temperature-dependent sex determination the impacts of rising temperature are particularly pertinent. At the key breeding grounds of many Sea Turtle populations the sand has warmed significantly since the 1990’s and researchers say that this almost certainly accounts for the dramatic decrease in the number of males. Since turtles will often return to the same beaches where they were born to lay their own eggs, this cycle will likely continue; and with global temperatures continuing to rise, many Sea Turtle populations are in danger of high egg mortality and female-only offspring production.

“Finding that there are next to no males among young Northern Green Turtles should ring alarm bells, but all is not lost for this important population.”
– WWF Australia CEO Dermot O’Gorman

The good news is that management strategies are possible. Options include shading beaches or using artificial rain to cool the beach. Protecting some of the big breeding males from threats such as poaching and entanglement is also going to be of particular importance.

Of the seven species of sea Turtles in the world, five species have been recorded in the Maldives and some species are known to nest here: The Green Turtle (Chelonia mydas), Hawksbill Turtle (Eretmochelys imbricata), Olive Ridley Turtle (Lepidochelys olivacea), Loggerhead Turtle (Caretta caretta) and Leatherback Turtle (Dermachelys coriacea). The Maldivian archipelago clearly serves as an important habitat for Sea Turtles, and here at Gili Lankanfushi we strive to help maintain that habitat by educating our guests about the negative effects of global warming; reducing the amount of harmful marine debris entering the ocean and growing our seagrass beds that act as a carbon sink and produce food for our sea turtle population.

So, what can you do to help mitigate climate change? Start by finding ways to reduce your carbon footprint; embrace a minimalist lifestyle, walk instead of drive, [a comprehensive list of ways to reduce your carbon footprint can be found here and here] and support only the large companies that are reducing theirs too.

Acknowledgements:

Guarino, Ben. 2018. Climate change is turning 99 percent of these baby sea turtles female’. Washington Post.

Hogge, Katie. 2018. Not Cool: Climate Change Turning 99% of These Sea Turtles Female. Ocean Conservancy.

Jensen, M.P., Allen, C.D., Eguchi, T., Bell, I.P., LaCasella, E.L., Hilton, W.A., Hof, C.A. and Dutton, P.H., 2018. Environmental warming and feminization of one of the largest sea turtle populations in the world. Current Biology, 28(1), pp.154-159.

Kaplan, Sarah. 2016. Some like it hot: Scientists figure out why female turtles are born at higher temperatures. Washington Post.

WWF. 2018. How climate change is turning Green Turtle populations female in the Northern Great Barrier Reef. WorldWildLife.org.

PADI guest blogger Jon Fry introduces himself:

After receiving my degree in Marine Biology & Coastal Ecology from Plymouth University I worked in Madagascar where I gained experience in reef restoration and tropical biology. I believe awareness is the most important tool we have in conservation, and I am pleased to be here at Gili Lankanfushi where I can educate the curious about marine life and sustainability.

Green Sea Turtle Nesting on Earth Day 2018

In the early hours of Earth Day, 22nd April 2018, a female green sea turtle was coming to an end of her journey as she finished laying the last of her 150 ping pong ball sized eggs in the sand close to the tree line at Gili Lankanfushi.

The adult turtle was around one meter in size with her carapace (shell) measuring around 80cm. After arriving on the beach just before high tide (at 4:30am) she searched for a safe spot to lay her eggs in an area where the sand was soft enough to dig a hole around 50 cm deep.

She succeeded on her second attempt and went into a trance to deliver her clutch. We did not want to disturb her but used this opportunity to assess her size and check the hole was deep enough for her eggs.

After a two-hour process, she began to make her way back to the ocean. Her energy levels were high and her timing impeccable as she re-entered the water at 6:15am, just before first light.

The nest is in an area that could be disturbed by hosts or guests walking, so we constructed a make shift boundary to protect the eggs from the pressure of human feet above.

After a 60 day incubation period we hope to witness the emergence of the hatchlings as they make their way down to the ocean. Turtle hatchlings follow the light of the moon to reach the ocean so we will be sure to turn off external lights during this time as any light pollution could cause the hatchlings to make a wrong turn and reduce their chance of survival.

Female green sea turtles nest three to five times per season and they lay their eggs on beaches within a 100kilometre radius of where they hatched. We hope she is planning to nest again on Gili’s shores in the next few months. We noticed a unique marking on her carapace and we will try to use this white mark to identify her in the future. However, we were not able to get clear photographic identification as we did not want to disturb her behaviour by shining a light on her.

As she entered the water, we became acutely aware of the responsibility we had been given – to keep these eggs safe from disturbance and predators for around two months until they emerge as hatchlings.

As only one in 1000 turtle hatchlings make it to adulthood we can safely say that Gili is carrying precious cargo into the months ahead.

PADI’s guest blogger Clare Baranowski introduces herself:

I am a marine zoologist from the UK who has worked throughout the tropics researching mega fauna and reef ecosystems in the Caribbean and Indian Ocean. I have experience monitoring and restoring coral and surveying manta, turtle and dolphin populations. I began my career as a science communicator before moving into research and management roles, this is why I incorporate outreach and education into every project I work on and I hope to continue this at Gili Lankanfushi

Earth Day – Sunday 22nd April

On Sunday 22nd April, the Prodivers team and guests of Hurawalhi joined the largest civic-focused day of action in the world – Earth Day! The campaign for Earth Day 2018 was ‘End Plastic Pollution’, a movement dedicated to providing information and inspiration needed to fundamentally change human attitude and behaviour towards plastics.


Plastics are a substance the earth cannot digest. The very qualities that made plastics such an attractive material initially; durable, flexible, versatile and inexpensive, have ultimately generated rubbish with staying power – a huge environmental issue. Our voracious appetite for plastic goods, coupled with our tendency to discard, litter and thus pollute, has led to an estimated 8 million tonnes of plastic entering our oceans every year. Plastics not only threaten our wildlife through entanglement, ingestion and habitat disruption, but their ability to absorb chemicals and accumulate in the human food chain has also led to plastics negatively affecting human health.


So, instead of diving with sharks or snorkelling with manta rays, the 48th Earth Day saw Hurawalhi staff and guests dive and snorkel for debris instead! They were let loose to clean up as much plastic and rubbish they could find off a nearby reef. Whilst they may have made only the tiniest dent in removing some of the debris currently be in our oceans, every action counts. There are so many simple ways to reduce plastic consumption in our day-to-day lives, here are some of the tips our Marine Biologist, Kirsty, shared with all of our volunteers this Earth Day:

1. Refrain from using plastic straws, even in restaurants. If a straw is a must, purchase a reusable one.

2. Forget the plastic bag. Purchase a reusable produce bag and be sure to wash them often.

3. Give up gum. Chewing gum is made of a synthetic rubber, i.e. plastic.

4. Ditch bottles for boxes. Often, products like laundry detergent come in cardboard which is more easily recycled than plastic.

5. Leave the single-use plastic bottles on the shelf. Use a reusable bottle or mug for your beverages, even when ordering from a to-go shop.

6. Don’t buy foods in plastic containers e.g. berries, tomatoes etc. Ask your local grocer to take your plastic containers back.

7. Disregard the disposable nappy. Use cloth nappies to reduce your baby’s carbon footprint and save money.

8. Stop purchasing single serving products. Buy bulk items instead and pack your lunch in reusable containers and bags.

9. Refuse to buy disposable razors and toothbrushes. Purchase replaceable blades instead.

Abstain from buying frozen foods. Even though those that appear to be packaged in cardboard are coated in a thin layer of plastic, plus you’ll be eating fewer processed foods.

A great quote from Marine Biologist, Sylvia Earle, sums up perfectly the importance of looking after the ocean: ‘No water, no life. No blue, no green’

PADI’s guest blogger Kirsty introduces herself:

Growing up in Mallorca, surrounded by the riches of the Mediterranean Sea, Kirsty’s ambition to pursue a career in marine biology was ignited from a young age. Kirsty completed both her undergraduate and postgraduate degrees at Newcastle University in England. During her studies she had the opportunity to conduct fieldwork in the Bahamas, Bermuda and the Maldives. It is not surprising then that her research interests to date have focused on tropical reef ecology. More specifically, Kirsty is interested in studying the movement patterns and habitat use of sharks and rays. Kirsty is currently part of the Maldivian Manta Trust research team, collecting data around the country’s manta population, its movements, and how the environment and tourism / human interactions affect them.

 

 

The Adaptable Prevail – A Message from PADI’s CEO

Put “adaptive” and “PADI” together and it conjures images of people overcoming disabilities and challenges, and rightly so. Diving is one of those rare, rich experiences that can help heal the body, heart and soul, whether someone’s dealing with PTSD (post traumatic stress disorder), paraplegia, cerebral palsy, amputation – the list goes on, as you know. With its performance-based design focused on what people can do instead of what they can’t, the PADI® System’s adaptive approach has opened diving and the underwater world to thousands.

Thousands? I should say millions. The PADI System’s adaptability isn’t new, and it benefits 25 million of us and counting – that’s every single PADI Diver. It has made PADI the world’s dominating force in diving because we all have challenges, needs, interests, preferences and desires. Only a system that adapts to the infinite individuality of learning and teaching can address all of these distinct variables.

What makes the PADI System stand apart is its ability to fit a standardized diving instructional system to so many people individually, in so many ways. It is international, cross-cultural, multilingual and transgenerational, so that beyond accommodating varied learning needs and preferences it builds a bridge that makes us one amid our differences. Take five PADI Divers from China, Italy, Mexico, Russia and Vietnam and put them on a boat for a day. They share a language even if they don’t, because they “speak” diving and the ocean, thanks to the PADI System you and your fellow PADI Professionals apply every day.

The PADI System succeeds because it stands on a solid, unshakeable but adaptable philosophical and instructional foundation that retains our core values while evolving as emerging technologies and social trends change how we meet individual needs, one student at a time. As the PADI family stands up for ocean health and marine animal protection, and champions the power of diving in community, and health and wellness, we need to recognize that, hand in hand with tenacity, this is where our strength lies. Overcoming challenges requires adapting what we do, whether it’s to help one person with an individual need or one planet with a social need.

The Chinese philosopher Lao-tsu said, “An army that cannot yield will be defeated. A tree that cannot bend will crack in the wind. The hard and stiff will be broken; the soft and supple will prevail.” The PADI family has emerged as a force for good because we don’t try to live in someone’s idealized version of what the world should be. Rather, we are supple. We adapt and change to meet what the real world blows our way. Together, we always have, and I expect, always will.

Good luck, good teaching and good diving,

(Drew Richardson Ed.D.
PADI President and CEO)

Using Virtual Reality in your dive store

Virtual Reality in your dive store

The modern day shopping experience is constantly evolving. Customer’s need their senses tingled before committing to a purchase, and virtual reality will do just that. Swapping quaint imagery of Red Sea fish life for the PADI® VR Scuba Planner app will give your customers the immersive experience of Egypt right from your store.

For dive businesses that plan dive trips to Egypt, the PADI® VR Scuba Planner is a great tool to back up a sales promotion. Instead of relying on your word to explain how great Red Sea diving is, simply let your customers see for themselves. Through VR glasses, divers and non-divers alike can experience 360-degree videos on a mobile device. Giving your customers virtual bottom time on some of the Red Sea’s most memorable dives will certainly tempt them to book their place on a trip.

In addition to the modern day sales pitch, the app also has the very real benefit of being able to plan dives. Available on Apple and Android, divers can plan 67 immersions in the Red Sea with tips and advice from PADI Pros in the area. The geo-positioning and mapping feature allows for accurately planned dives accompanied by maps, photos, key information and illustrations to further assist with pre-dive planning.

Use this post from the PADI Blog, The Virtual Red Sea, across your social media channels to encourage your customers to come and check out the PADI VR Scuba Planner!

The PADI VR Scuba Planner is available in eight languages and can be found here:

For Apple devices

For Android devices

Project AWARE® and how to introduce more to your Business

I have mentioned before about Project AWARE® and the benefits for your Business. But I have been moved by the recent uptake of PADI Centres and Instructors who have signed up as 100% AWARE Partners. If you don’t include myself there is now 9 Centre’s and 4 Instructors in the UK. Each one making a contribution to the cause with every Certification they are doing.

Thank you
Oxford Dive Centre
Vivian Dive Centre
Reef Scuba Ltd
Scuba Leeds
The Fifth Point Diving Centre
Wavecrest Scuba
Viewpoint North Diving
Gatwick Scuba
London Diving Centre
Instructor’s Daniel Chan, Ollie Powell, Geoffrey Creighton and Ian Edge

One of our goals at PADI is to mobilise  Divers to Be a Force for Good, which is critical to PADI’s Four Pillars of Change.

Project AWARE® plays a huge part in our Ocean Health Pillar.  Ocean Health is vital to us all on this Ocean Planet and we at PADI are forging partnerships with organisations that support the establishment of more marine protected areas (MPAs) and the reduction of human pressures that threaten the future of our blue planet like marine debris.

Please take time to mobilise your own divers and get engage through the Project AWARE® specialty courses. Why not include Dive Against Debris® as part of your Advanced Open Water or conduct it on every dive as it is so easy now to record your data using the Project AWARE® App.

Do you generally dive at the same spot, then why not Adopt a Dive Site™? Adopt a Dive Site is tailored to our most dedicated dive leaders: participants commit to carrying out monthly Dive Against Debris surveys, reporting types and quantities of marine debris found underwater each month from the same location. This picture was sent to me from The Fifth Point Diving Centre. What was really interesting was the fact that Tudor Crisps went out of business in 1993, so that bag which looks relatively intact has been around for some time.

I was watching with interest over Scuba Leeds’ quest to find a site to adopt. The social media interactions over this from people who were inquiring as to how to join in and to let them know next time they were doing a dive was phenomenal. Fantastic work everyone and please keep up the great work.

Why not have a look at the interactive map  and get your own clean up on there. It will certainly raise your profile when you share it.

Please speak to your Regional Manager to find out more about it.

 

PADI Regional Manager Project AWARE Dive Against Debris

It was a very proud day for me as Regional Manager of Malta (and Northern UK), to have recently been able to introduce my fellow PADI Regional Managers, to one of my regions, Malta.

Malta played host to a major conference at which time all of the PADI Regional Managers from around our EMEA Region, also we had all of the Territory Directors, Vice Presidents as well as our CEO Drew Richardson and CMO Kristin Valette-Wirth in attendance.

The annual conference is a chance for us to update each other and get a better understanding of how we can, as PADI Regional Managers better support our Members.

During this conference, we made time to conduct a Project AWARE  Dive Against Debris®.  This opportunity allowed us to lead by example as one of our goals at PADI is to mobilise our Divers to Be a Force for Good, this is critical to, PADI’s Four Pillars of Change.  (find out more here http://www2.padi.com/blog/2017/04/11/mobilizing-divers-to-be-a-force-good-padis-four-pillars-of-change/)

Project AWARE plays a huge part in our Ocean Health Pillar.  Ocean Health is vital to us all on this Ocean Planet and we at PADI are forging partnerships with organisations that support the establishment of more marine protected areas (MPAs) and the reduction of human pressures that threaten the future of our blue planet like marine debris.

Our clean up took place at the HMS Maori (a Tribal-class destroyer, sunk while at Malta in 1942) which now sits near the bottom of the walls to the stunning capital Vallette.

Please take time to mobilise your own divers and get engaged through the Project AWARE speciality courses. Why not include Dive Against Debris® as part of your Advanced Open Water or conduct it on every dive as it is so easy now to record your data using the Project AWARE App (https://www.projectaware.org/news/use-your-phone-take-action-clean-ocean).

Do you generally dive at the same spot, then why not Adopt a Dive Site™? Adopt a Dive Site is tailored to our most dedicated dive leaders: participants commit to carry out monthly Dive Against Debris surveys, reporting types and quantities of marine debris found underwater each month from the same location. (https://www.projectaware.org/adoptadivesite).

Please speak to your Regional Manager to find out more about it.

Matt Clements
PADI Regional Manager

 

Aqua Lung iXperience Tour2018

Aqua Lung has decided on the occasion of its 75th Anniversary to organize a Tour of events, all over Europe in collaboration with PADI EMEA and DAN Europe.

Unlike the European side of the tour there’s no need to book through an Aqua Lung Centre, simply select your venue and visit the Aqua Lung tent at the water’s edge and collect a computer*. This is your chance to dive the new Aqua Lung range of computers – FOR FREE!

Why not take advantage of this opportunity and participate in the Nitrox Specialty courses both at Professional and recreational level?
PADI will be following up this event with a “Business of Nitrox” Seminar and promotion. The “Business of Nitrox” will be organised and open to all PADI instructors and Centres by the PADI EMEA Regional Managers Matt Clements and Emma Hewitt.

Finally, there will be the possibility to participate in a workshop organized by the DAN Research Team, to download the dive profiles on the Dive Safety Guardian platform.

The tour runs across six dates and venues, simply select your venue and visit the Aqua Lung tent at the water’s edge and collect a computer*

Everyone that tests a computer has the chance to win a Reveal mask and a matching Aquilon snorkel!**

Location Dates
Capernwray
LA6 1AD
14th and 15th April 2018
Stoney Cove
LE9 4DW
21st and 22nd April 2018
Vobster Quay
BA3 5SD
5th and 6th May 2018
Wraysbury
TW19 5ND
12th and 13th May 2018
NDAC
NP16 7LH
19th and 20th May 2018
The Delph
PR7 5PR
26th and 27th May 2018

Come and speak to your Regional Manager to find out more about integrating computers into your courses.

** Aqua Lung rental equipment is free | Product availability will vary due to demand | Proof of dive qualification or instructor supervision required.
** The winner will be drawn at the end of each day and contacted the following Monday.

*Please note, entry fee to the dive location (if applicable) is not included.

The Virtual Red Sea

PADI’s newest app makes diving the Red Sea even easier. And you don’t have to be a diver to do it.

By Tara Bradley Connell

Panorama

Thanks to the recent addition of the PADI® VR Scuba Planner, divers and non-divers alike can experience the underwater realms of the Red Sea. The PADI VR Scuba Planner, developed by I Love the Sea, is the newest addition to  I Love The Sea suite of virtual reality apps, featuring Red Sea experiences such as dive site tours, geo-positioning and route planning.   The real thrills come with the 360-degree views that give users virtual bottom time on some of the Red Sea’s most memorable dive sites, without ever getting wet.

Available on Apple and Android apps, the PADI VR Scuba Planner enables divers to plan 67 immersions in the Red Sea with tips and advice from PADI Pros in the area.  The geo-positioning and mapping feature allows for accurately planned dives accompanied by maps, photos, key information and illustrations to further assist with pre-dive planning. Each  dive site is also  shown in a 360 video, making it possible for each user to enjoy the dive from their mobile device in 360 or, to  maximize the experience,  through VR glasses.

The PADI VR Scuba Planner is available in eight languages and can be found here:

For Apple devices

For Android devices