My PADI Club™

The Portal to a World of Underwater Exploration and Discovery.

Written by Mohammad Dahdul, PADI Marketing Consultant

Sharing your passion for diving, the ocean and ocean conservation is what you do as a dive professional. You’re likely looking for innovative ways to make diving accessible and increase engagement for those who want to continue their dive journeys. My PADI Club™ was created to help you keep your ­customers diving for a lifetime.

Based on the extensive research ­provided by McKinsey & Company, one of the world’s leading research and business consulting firms, My PADI Club is designed to overcome the barriers people experience when learning to dive and help prevent divers from drifting away from diving. It provides what they need to stay active in the sport.

The barriers identified include dive planning being too difficult, trouble finding people to dive with, and reliable ratings of dive sites and dive businesses being unavailable. When it launches, My PADI Club will offer divers an online community for finding information about dive centers and sites globally, a dive buddy finder, custom dive notifications and trusted ratings. The platform’s tools work to not only make diving more accessible to the average ocean explorer, but to also increase repeat customers and drive business growth for PADI® Members in numerous ways.

Advertise Your Business

Advertising is imperative to grow your business and My PADI Club actually makes it easy. Publicizing what you offer and promoting your events is funda­mental to customer acquisition, and in building and maintaining customer loyalty. Think of My PADI Club as another marketing tool to drive customers to your store and participate in your events. The more you advertise and network, the larger, more loyal customer base you’ll build.

There are various ways to use My PADI Club as an additional advertising tool. Upload promotion or event flyers to the activity feed, change your dive center display ad with monthly specials or tent sales, and directly interact with customers through “likes” and “comments.” By uploading a display ad and linking it to your website or event page, you’ll be able to drive more traffic to your events. Reference the photo specs in the Settings section of My PADI Club to make sure your photo is the correct dimension and size.

Although advertising’s main ­objective is typically to foster business growth, you can also use it to share your passion for conservation with your network. Use the platform as a way to highlight the conservation projects that you and your team are working on. Invite your My PADI Club connections to your Dive Against Debris® events and enlist them to help have a ­positive impact on ocean health.

The wide reach of advertising through My PADI Club gives you the opportunity to grow your business, build a community of like-minded individuals, and work toward PADI’s Pillars of Change.

Build Stronger Customer Relationships

People and Community is one of PADI’s Pillars of Change and is the heart of teaching the world to dive. Building a community of divers in your area is a crucial way to keep customers returning to your business.

In Entrepreneur’s 5 Ways to Build Killer Relationships with Customers, connecting and communicating are two of the most important actions to forging healthy customer relationships. Both interpersonal and online interactions have a direct effect on whether or not a customer returns a second time. The consistency of these interactions also plays a large role in keeping your business, and diving in general, at the top of a customer’s mind. In the technologically advanced world in which we live, maintaining constant contact with another person is as easy as tapping a button on your smartphone. My PADI Club can offer this consistent, and instant, interaction.

Use the convenience of My PADI Club to your advantage by connecting and interacting with your customers in several ways. Update your instructional team on your dive center profile so student divers can easily follow their dive mentors. Make sure you and your instructors follow your students’ profiles as well. Once you’re following them, comment and like their logged dives, photos and videos encouraging them to continue their dive adventures. Post interesting content that will prompt your customers to interact with you. Maintaining these relationships could lead to referrals to friends and family.

Another way to prompt students to dive with you is by contributing to Go Dive Alerts™. As a PADI Pro, you are the local expert of the sites you frequently dive. Report conditions in My PADI Club for dive sites each day to alert divers of conditions that might pique their interest – for example, perfect water temperature and great visibility. My PADI Club users can customize notification triggers – Go Dive Alerts – for their favorite dive sites. As you report conditions, divers who chose to receive alerts for specific parameters at their favorite dive sites will be alerted to go dive. Prompting divers to dive reinforces their passion for scuba and gets them back into your dive center more often.

Having the ability to follow new and existing divers, other PADI Members, as well as share your passion and knowledge of diving within your community will make your voice and influence as strong, and global, as ever.

Grow Your Business

Using My PADI Club to advertise and build stronger customer relationships ultimately leads to business growth. By enabling your customers to become My PADI Club Premium members (coming later in 2018), you help them access exclusive savings on PADI continuing education courses and gear from some of the top dive brands. Leveraging these premium features is the best way to sell a Premium membership to both new and experienced divers.

What’s in it for you? Earn commissions for every new Premium membership sold. Commissions are paid on first-time Premium members only and the diver must remain a Premium member for at least 60 days. You will be paid in credit each month and also have the option to cash out credit via a check.

Encouraging your customers to join My PADI Club and upgrade to a Premium membership not only benefits them, but you as well. When customers seek out your dive services and products time and time again, you earn more revenue from each return visit. By bringing all your divers into the largest online dive community, you grow a robust dive tribe and expand your influence.

Set Up Your Profile

Now that you know there are many ways to leverage My PADI Club, it’s time to learn how to create and update your profile. Use these steps:

  • Step 1: Visit my.padi.com and log in using your PADI Pros’ Site or ScubaEarth username and password.
  • Step 2: Click on Profile to update your profile image, avatar, and general info. Connect with divers and share your photos.
  • Step 3: For Dive Centers and Resorts: Although some aspects of your profile can be updated directly on the My PADI Club dive center profile, information such as parking, transportation, services and courses must all be updated within the PADI Pros’ Site Premium listing section. To update these additional store details, go to PADI Pros’ Site (padi.com/mypadi). Log in using your Dive Center/Resort account, select the Account tab and then select Premium listing. Update your Premium Listing to improve your My PADI Club profile. This information will automatically populate into your My PADI Club ­profile within 24 hours.

Be sure to make your profile stand out. Add photos, videos and content that’s intriguing to your customers to make your profile distinctive. Remember, ­interaction and content are key in attaining the ­maximum benefits of My PADI Club.

Using the tools discussed throughout this article will help you leverage the My PADI Club platform. As mentioned, the best ways to fully benefit from My PADI Club is to be an exceedingly active member through consistent updates, constant interaction and communication with other users, and posting interesting content. Use your voice and influence as a dive mentor in My PADI Club to spread your passion for diving and encourage others to continue their exploration of the ocean, and to protect it while doing so.

 

 

How you as a Divemaster can encourage more women into the world of diving

 

 

July 21, 2018 marks the fourth annual PADI Women’s Dive Day. With hundreds of events hosted by PADI Dive Centres and Resorts around the world, divers will join together to celebrate female divers, aiming to encourage more women to take up the sport. 

 As a PADI Divemaster you can help encourage more women to take the plunge and sign up for a scuba diving course. Here are 5 top tips how to inspire and empower others to enjoy diving as much as you do!

  •  Promote PADI eLearning

PADI eLearning provides a flexible learning option that enables women and men alike to easily fit dive theory around work and family commitments. Learning to dive has never been more convenient!

  • Promote ReActivate

As a PADI Divemaster you can conduct the ReActivate™ program for certified divers. With that in mind get in touch with women who have dropped out of diving and invite them back to ReActivate.

  • Promote scuba diving lessons for kids

Having more female divers generally increases the number of families diving, which helps create a stronger and more active dive community. As a PADI Divemaster you can further attract mothers and families into diving by promoting kids scuba programs, such as PADI Bubblemaker, PADI SealTeam and PADI Junior Open Water Diver. Learning to dive will help the soon to be female divers relax from the stresses of daily life and keep the kids active at the same time!

  • Organise non-diving events

Non-diving events (for example, beach clean ups, hosting fundraising events for Project AWARE) can help divers and non-divers alike connect with the dive community. As a PADI Divemaster you can encourage your customers to invite female friends who are curious about diving, so they can network with scuba enthusiasts and get a flavour of what extraordinary experiences lie ahead of them on their scuba journey.

  • Stock women’s dive gear

Encourage your dive centre to stock up on female and children’s dive equipment. When walking into a dive centre for possibly the first time, people need to be able to identify themselves in imagery, so including bright and vibrant photos of women diving in your marketing materials should help inspire more female divers.

 

Don’t forget to register your event on the PADI Women’s Dive Day event locator so divers can easily find information and make plans to take part. It’s easy! All PADI Members (dive shops and individual pros) can simply enter the details here and your event will show when a diver looks for Women’s Dive Day events near them.

PADI Divemasters, we are reaching out to you to help us spread the word! By implementing one of our top tips you can help to encourage more women into the world of diving!

 

 

 

 

 

Help Divers Avoid Injuries

Written by DAN Staff

In the Northern Hemisphere spring is a great time to maintain both equipment and skills in preparation for warmer weather and a busy dive season. As many divers make sure their gear is ready to get in the water, you can help them make sure they’re ready, too. By familiarizing yourself with the most common causes of diving accidents, you can offer tips for effective skills practice.

What causes the most accidents?

Accident analysis data has shown that there are five leading causes of preventable dive accidents and injuries:

  1. Uncontrolled ascents
  2. Ear and equalization problems
  3. Poor air management
  4. Diving beyond personal limits
  5. Failure to adequately plan and perform dives

At least one of these factors is present in the vast majority of reported incidents.

How can you help divers avoid incidents?

A great way to minimize problems is to get divers to practice foundational dive skills. Encourage your students and customers to consider which of their skills need improvement and suggest ways for them to practice these skills. Ascents, buoyancy control, ear equalization and emergency weight release at the surface can all be practiced in the pool. Divers can work on air management and dive planning by calculating their air consumption and planning practice dives with you or an experienced buddy.

BonaireOW0213__0757_Equalize

What else can you do?

Some dive accidents are caused by unexpected equipment problems. Make sure divers know how to maintain, store and care for their gear. Also suggest they practice responding to different gear failures – regulator malfunction or stuck BCD inflators – by reviewing air sharing skills, freeflow regulator breathing and disconnecting their low pressure inflators underwater. Although not common issues, divers should feel comfortable responding to such events before they get in the water.

For more information about safe diving practices or preventing dive accidents, visit DAN.org.

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Training Bulletin Live – Webinar Schedule 2Q2018

Please find below the dates for the next round of Training Bulletin Live Webinars:

As always, we will be discussing the latest standards changes, providing background information on the updates and insight into how these can be integrated into your training. We will also be reviewing new products and providing business and marketing advice.

2nd Quarter 2018:

24/04/18 English

https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/7839064196215400195

25/04/18 French

https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/7603107901475808771

26/04/18 Italian

https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/1567667576097658114

01/05/18 Dutch

https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/2106645976039839233

02/05/18 Arabic

https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/3571879361440354818

03/05/18 Polish

https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/6347696520440875010

07/05/18 Scandinavian

https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/7929177971619022594

08/05/18 Spanish

https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/886614679682627587

09/05/18 Portuguese

https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/4978906799319278850

16/05/18 Russian

https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/2943718472887247362

16/05/18 German

https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/4462673994655468033

If you have any questions regarding the webinar you can email [email protected]. We look forward to speaking to you during the webinar.

Quality Management Tips from the Field

Quality Management Tips from the Field

Throughout 2018, we’d like to share tips from PADI staff in the field on how to maintain and improve safety in your professional diving activities. This month we heard from PADI Territory Director, Rich Somerset:

“We are blessed with a career that puts us in contact with the ocean – and the ocean demands our respect. Treat her with respect and she will give you a lifetime of adventures, but underestimate her at your peril. Remember: be prudent in your decision making, put your students’ safety above your ego and – if in doubt – stay out.”

The ocean is a truly awe-inspiring environment, and as divers we experience its benefits every time we enter the water. But as Rich says – the ocean also demands our respect.

All dive professionals should know their limits and will endeavour to stay well within them. This means having an even-handed grasp on the abilities of your students too. Use your judgement when assessing factors such as water conditions, ability of participants, your and your assistant’s personal limitations, and ratios etc.

Ask yourself questions such as:

  • “Am I familiar with this dive site?”
  • “Can I expect bad visibility or perhaps strong currents?”
  • “Can I provide adequate assistance to all divers in the group?”

With all things considered, you as the dive professional have the ultimate responsibility for making the final decision as to whether to dive. If something goes wrong, the question likely to be asked is– “Should the divers have been in the water at that time, in that environment, in those conditions, with their experience?” In these instances, you, as the professional, may well be asked to defend your decision to dive.

Rich couldn’t be more right when he says “be prudent in your decision making, put your students’ safety above your ego and – if in doubt – stay out.”

Expand into Instructor Training

EFRIT

Helping new EFR instructor candidates to gain instructor level knowledge and skill and then pass that on through positive coaching to their own students is the role of the EFR Instructor Trainer. As an EFRIT your own skills will also be polished as you role model instructor level teaching. You’ll also consider opportunities outside your normal market as you guide instructors considering work in a wide range of environments.

If you would like to be an EFR Instructor Trainer you will need to:

  • Be an EFR Primary / Secondary Care Instructor
  • Be an EFR Care For Children Instructor
  • Have registered at least 25 EFR students

OR

  • Have conducted at least 5 separate EFR courses

And successfully complete an EFR Instructor Trainer Course. For dates and locations of these courses please click here.

Responders in Action

Emergency First Response would like to congratulate Samra Abd El Wahab (PADI OWSI and EFR Instructor # 372290) for providing much needed assistance when called upon.

Samra was on the way home from a Halloween party in the early morning of the 01.11.2017. She entered a subway station in Munich and at the platform she saw a group of young women (about 20 years old) screaming, and one girl was lying on the floor. Samra approached them and saw that the girl on the floor had white foam around her mouth and was already quite blueish in her face. She directed her friends to call the ambulance and to notify the police station in the subway about the situation. At the same time she checked the airways and found that the girl was not breathing. She started CPR and Rescue breathing for about 2-3 minutes until the girl started breathing again. The girl regained consciousness, and Samra stayed with her, keeping her calm until the ambulance arrived.

Well done, Samra!

Emergency First Response Manuals Go Digital

Emergency First Response Manuals Go Digital

The first EFR digital student manuals are planned for release during 2018.

With more and more people using their tablets, phones and computers the option for online and offline digital study materials is increasingly popular and in demand.

The manuals will be accessed through the Adobe Experience Manager (AEM) platform which offers a great online and offline experience. It also offers the ability to search for key words so that a learner can quickly find information to review or jump back to a specific topic or course content. Updates are almost seemless and each time the user logs in the most current content is available.

With such an exciting prospect we can hardly wait! Watch out for further information and announcements later in the year.

Diving with Hazardous Marine Life

Written by DAN staff

Diving, swimming and even just going to the beach offers the opportunity to observe marine animals in their natural environment. Unfortunately, inappropriate or unintentional interactions with some marine life can lead to serious injuries. The good news is that most injuries are largely preventable with some forethought, knowledge and awareness. However, accidents do happen and each year a number of divers sustain marine life injuries. Below are best practices for dealing with some of the most common marine life injuries:

Urchins

Sea urchins are echinoderms, a phylum of marine animals shared with starfish, sand dollars and sea cucumbers. They are omnivorous, eating algae and decomposing animal matter, and have tubular feet that allow movement. Many urchins are covered in sharp, hollow spines that can easily puncture the skin and break off, and may penetrate a diver’s boots and wetsuit.

Urchin

Injuries caused by sea urchins are generally puncture wounds associated with redness and swelling. Pain and severity of the injury ranges from mild to severe, depending on the location of the injury and the compromised tissue, and life-threatening complications do occur but are extremely rare.

Divers can prevent sea urchin injuries by avoiding contact with good buoyancy control and being cautious of areas where sea urchins may exist, such as the rocky entry points while shore diving.

Treatment for sea urchin wounds is symptomatic and dependent on the type and location of injury. Application of heat to the area for 30 to 90 minutes may help. Sea urchin spines are very fragile, so any attempt to remove superficial spines should be done with caution. Wash the area first without forceful scrubbing to avoid causing additional damage if there are still spines embedded in the skin. Apply antibiotic ointment and seek medical evaluation to address any embedded spines or infection risk.

Stingrays

Stingrays are frequently considered dangerous, largely without cause. Stingrays are shy and peaceful fish that do not present a threat to divers unless stepped on or deliberately threatened. Stingrays can vary in size from less than 30 centimetres/one foot to greater than two metres/six feet in breadth, and reside in nearly every ocean.

From DAN_stingrays_iStock_000019476594_WEB

The majority of injuries occur in shallow waters where divers or swimmers accidently step on or come in contact with stingrays. Injuries from stingrays are rarely fatal but can be painful. They result from contact with a serrated barb at the end of a stingray’s tail, which has two venomous glands at its base. The barb can easily cut through wetsuit material and cause lacerations or puncture wounds. Deep lacerations can reach large arteries. If a barb breaks off in a wound, it may require surgical care. Wounds are prone to infections.

Injury treatment varies based on the type and location of the injury. Clean the wound thoroughly, control bleeding and immediately seek medical attention. Due to the nature of the stingray venom and the risk of serious infections, seek professional help for stingray wounds.

For more information on first aid and safe diving practices, visit DAN.org/Health

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PADI Divemasters, Lend your Voice to Marine Conservation!

Dive against Debris

Dive against Debris

PADI Divemasters have the power to be the world’s most passionate advocates for marine conservation. With your unique underwater access and dive skills, you are a powerful movement – one that can seek out action and mobilise change for the better! So, with that in mind, here are 5 tips how you can lend your voice to promote marine conservation efforts.

 

  1. As a mentor to divers the focus of your dives should be on the education and understanding of local marine life you are hoping to see. PADI Divemasters supervise both training and non-training related activities by planning, organising and directing dives. You can use these attributes to empower divers to become ocean stewards in several ways, such as:

 

  1. You can partake in the development of environmental education and awareness programs! As a PADI Divemaster you can teach the Coral Reef Conservation and Project AWARE Specialist course on completion of the following: 1) the “Learning, Instruction and the PADI System” presentation from the Assistant Instructor Course. 2) a PADI Speciality Instructor Course taught by a qualified PADI Speciality Instructor Trainer. Make sure you ask your students to choose a Project AWARE version of their PADI certification card to support a clean and healthy ocean!

 

  1. Strengthen your ongoing commitment to global marine conservation activities by working for, or continuing your dive education with, a 100% AWARE partner. Across the world, PADI dive centres have committed to ocean protection through the 100% AWARE partnership. 100% AWARE partners support a healthy ocean by making a donation to Project AWARE on behalf of each student that they certify. Visit the 100% AWARE Dive Partner Map to locate a 100% AWARE dive centre or instructor.

 

  1. Inspire year-round action to remove, report and prevent underwater debris by organising Dive against Debris clean up actions. Check out the Dive Against Debris Event Organizer Kit to download helpful tools to recruit and organise your volunteers. The data collected helps influence policies and drive change needed to stop trash from reaching the ocean in the first place. Don’t forget to encourage your volunteers to upload their findings on the Dive Against Debris™ Interactive Map to further highlight the quantity and type of marine debris littering our seas.

 

  1. Spread the word about the importance of ocean conservation! One person can make a difference, but think how much greater an impact you’ll have if you recruit fellow divers to the cause!

So, what are you waiting for? Lend your support and your voice by becoming an active advocate for ocean conservation!