Get yourself covered all year round, worldwide

As a PADI Professional, it is critical that you can get on with what you do best. Teach students the world’s most popular dive curriculum, show them the wonders of the ocean, and transform their lives. To help you do this, PADI has teamed up with Divers Alert Network Europe (DAN Europe) to offer PADI endorsed professional liability, personal accident insurance and FREE dive accident cover for an unlimited number of your students so you can have peace of mind while you teach.

Maintaining current liability insurance is not only good risk management but PADI Pros working within the PADI Europe, Middle East and Africa territory may need to carry professional liability insurance to remain in PADI Teaching/Active status.

As a PADI dive professional, you’re a champion of safety working on the front lines every day to protect the divers in your care. The PADI endorsed DAN Europe insurance program provides PADI Pros access to risk-mitigation and safety programs to protect both divers and dive professionals.

Features of PADI endorsed DAN Europe insurance program

    • Personal accident cover for diving emergencies that is valid all year round, worldwide
    • Access to the renowned DAN specialised multilingual hotline, 24/7
    • Unlimited cover in case of hyperbaric treatment and repatriation
    • Travel insurance provided for non-diving medical emergencies abroad
    • € 4,000,000 professional liability cover, including legal defence, per occurrence
    • EXCLUSIVE PADI FEATUREFREE dive accident insurance for an UNLIMITED number of your dive students up to PADI Advanced Open Water Diver (AOWD) and PADI Advanced Freediver level*

In addition:

    • Members benefit from specialized consultancy services from the DAN Legal Network, so you have access to a worldwide network of legal experts and lawyers who are knowledgeable in diving-related disputes

Exclusive pricing for PADI Pros – Get Pro Silver for the price of Pro Bronze!

PADI Pros get access to discounted DAN Europe insurance plans receiving Pro Silver coverage for the price of Pro Bronze!

Sign up for the PADI endorsed DAN insurance program today

 

*The dive accident cover for an unlimited number of YOUR dive students is for the following PADI courses: Discover Scuba Diving, Open Water Diver, Advanced Open Water Diver, Basic Freediver, Freediver and Advanced Freediver.

Student dive accident cover includes:

  • Alarm Centre and management of medical emergencies 24/7
  • Worldwide emergency medical treatment & medical evacuation (€15,000,00)
  • Search & rescue of the missing diver (€ 2,500,00)

How Can We Protect More of Our Oceans?

For more than two decades, scientists have been telling us that Marine Protected Areas (MPAs) are one of the keys to long term ocean health. While some debated their worth early on, today there’s little dispute. As reported by Smithsonian Magazine, MPAs with full protection have four times as much life (biomass). Species grow larger and reproduce proportionately more. MPAs and the areas around them recover more quickly from environmental damage, and (along with fishery management) have higher fish catches — so much so that commercial fishing comes out ahead despite the loss of fishable area.While established as big wins for everyone, global governments arenot on track to meet a U.N. goal to have 10% of the world’s ocean under full protection by 2020. Officially, we’re at just under 6%, but some say it’s really under 4% because some declared MPAs have no enforcement and nothing’s changed.

Moreton Bay Hope Spot Anemone Fish – Photo By Chis Roelfsema

But thanks to Hope Spots, we can help catch up and get ahead of the curve. Hope Spots, if you’re not familiar, were conceived by Dr. Sylvia Earle, with coordination and oversight by Mission Blue, a not-for-profit organization Dr. Earle founded to unite people and organizations for this cause. Hope Spots are unique marine areas identified as particularly distinct due to the diversity of species found there, the habitat’s importance for reproduction, threats from human activity, community economic needs or any other attribute that makes a location central to marine environmental health.

The idea is to conserve and preserve Hope Spots by leveraging public perception and attention so they receive appropriate protection (not necessarily becoming MPAs, and some Hope Spots are already MPAs). As you’d expect, the PADI organization formally partnered with Mission Blue in 2017, adding the weight of 26 million+ PADI Diver voices to the Hope Spot cause. Thanks to Dr. Earle, Hope Spots are a conspicuous example of how one person with a great idea can inspire millions to unite across borders and cultures for a common purpose.

Global Hope Spots map. Photo: Mission Blue

Today, there are almost 100 existing and proposed Hope Spots, and they are important, even though preserving them will not, in itself, halt global climate change, clean up the oceans, stop overfishing, etc. These bigger problems call for big, broad and deep social changes (that are not impossible), but we still need Hope Spots for several reasons:

  • By creating areas with proven biological productivity, they help us buy time addressing some of these challenges. For example, Hope Spots won’t solve overfishing, but by providing areas in which fish reproduction functions unchecked, we prop up fish populations as we sort through the management issues.
  • Hope Spots help preserve biodiversity. Some scientists see this as helping the ocean bounce back with as many species as possible as we make positive changes. Others, accepting that some change is permanent, see biodiversity as central to marine ecology. That is, some coral species tolerate heat better than others; having a diverse genetic supply of such species may be important in a warmer ocean.
  • Hope Spots are inspirational and visible. Hope Spots draw attention. They remind communities just how close and personal ocean threats are, but that we can (and must) act to offset them. As a source of local pride, Hot Spots inspire area divers and ocean advocates to speak up for and fight for them. Mission Blue, PADI and other supporters use social media to highlight Hope Spot stories to make and keep them in the broad public eye.

As a diver, you can support the PADI organization, Mission Blue and others united behind Hope Spots. You can nominate a Hope Spot, and you can participate in events promoting/protecting a Hope Spot (many led by PADI dive shops or instructors, and may tie in Project AWARE as well). Of course, you can contribute to Hope Spot funding – check out mission-blue.org. If you live near or visit a Hope Spot, talk about it in person and on social media – especially with those who may not be aware of it. Finally, get involved with Project AWARE and your local PADI dive operation to make every dive count. Millions of people like you and me passionately preserving, conserving and restoring the ocean is the best hope there is.

Dr. Drew Richardson
PADI President & CEO

PADI and The Reef-World Foundation Embark on a Global Venture to Make Sustainable Diving the Social Norm

PADI® and Reef-World have joined forces to promote sustainable diving practices for the protection of the marine environment. This partnership will raise awareness and deliver tools to implement the Green Fins standard of best practice, helping to ensure the long-term sustainability of coral reefs, recreational scuba diving and local livelihoods.

Green Fins is the only internationally recognized environmental standard for dive and snorkel operators, established through a partnership between UN Environment and The Reef World Foundation. Green Fins uses a unique and proven three-pronged approach; green certifications of dive centers, strengthening regulations and environmental education for dive staff, divers and government.

As the largest diver training organization in the world, PADI has the reach and influence to mobilize divers to be citizen activists. With 6,500 PADI Dive Centers and Resorts, 135,000 PADI Professionals and more than 25 million divers around the world, the PADI network has tremendous potential to make an impact on critical environmental issues.

PADI is committed to supporting social and environmental efforts through its Pillars of ChangeSM, designed to empower divers, and the dive industry, with information to get involved with causes they care about in tangible ways. With PADI’s support and more dive operators worldwide adhering to the best practices outlined by Green Fins, the dive industry can play a significant role in creating a more sustainable future.

“Reef-World is working in partnership with UN Environment on the front lines alongside business, government and the public to be the driving force for making sustainable diving and snorkeling the social norm globally. Our ultimate goal is to reduce local threats to coral reefs, allowing them to be more resilient to global impacts such as climate change. We’re thrilled to work with PADI, alongside other dive industry leaders, who can engage divers and diving businesses worldwide, helping us to scale solutions with the urgency that is required.” – JJ Harvey, Reef-World

Many locations are experiencing increasing numbers of tourists who are attracted by vibrant coral reefs. Ensuring that every diver and dive operator in all corners of the globe are equipped with appropriate training and knowledge will help relieve pressure on the marine environment.

“Unquestionably, there are serious and formidable issues threatening the world’s coral reefs. That said, I’m a firm believer in engagement, problem identification and mitigation. The PADI organization is committed to acting as a force for good. By empowering divers and connecting them to the PADI family and global issues relevant to our industry, we can help people be a powerful catalyst for change.” – Drew Richardson, President and CEO of PADI Worldwide.

“Saving coral reefs as a source of livelihoods and as a business asset requires collaboration between industry, civil society and governments. This partnership is set to raise the sustainability bar of the diving industry and will help establish environmentally friendly diving as the global norm” – Jerker Tamelander, Head of Coral Reef Unit, UN Environment

The partnership between PADI and Reef-World aims to reach more divers and businesses with the Green Fins lessons and tools. This will be achieved by:

  • Collaborating to help scale the proven solutions of Green Fins: PADI supports market research efforts for the development of a new Green Fins online support system for broader global implementation and easy adoption.
  • Promoting the Green Fins approach: PADI Dive Centres and Resorts are encouraged to adopt the Green Fins Code of Conduct and, where available, seek Green Fins certified membership.
  • Help deliver on PADI’s Pillars of Change focusing on marine animal protection and sustainable tourism by raising awareness throughout the diving industry about available tools and materials to promote change in business practices and reduce environmental impact.
  • Promoting sustainable dive tourism and coral reefs protection through the development of new online media content that inspires environmentally friendly actions.

Working collaboratively provides greater opportunity for dive operators around the world to be better informed and equipped to apply sustainable dive practices, using Green Fins’ guidelines. Reducing environmental threats and pressure on the fragile marine environment will result in improved coral reef resilience and increased sustainable tourism at dive destinations. The partnership delivers on the goals of Agenda 2030 of the United Nations, specifically SDG 12 (Sustainable Consumption and Production) and 14 (Life below water).

About Reef-World:

Reef-World supports governments and communities in sustainable consumption and production of coastal resources and marine life. This is done through the Green Fins initiative, established and implemented in partnership with UN Environment. Green Fins is a free membership program for participating businesses that provide scuba diving or snorkeling activities and pledge to follow a set of best environmental practices. Within the 550+ businesses that have implemented Green Fins across nine countries, consistent reduction in threats to the marine environment has been measured, reflecting continued improvements in environmental practice. Specific areas of change are seen in reduced single-use plastics and chemical cleaning products, more responsible underwater behavior among divers and improved environmental awareness within our target audience. For more information visit reef-world.org and greenfins.net.

PADI announces its 2019 Shows!

PADI has been busy planning its 2019 events schedule and is excited to announce that it will be exhibiting at the following shows:

Salon de la Plongée (Paris, France): 11 – 14 January – PADI Village.

BOOT (Dusseldorf, Germany): 19 – 27 January – PADI Village.

DIVE MENA Expo (Dubai, UAE): 26 February – 2 March.

EUDI (Bologna, Italy): 1 – 3 March – PADI Village.

PADI will also have a presence at these shows:

Moscow Dive Show (Moscow, Russia): 31 January – 3 February.

Duikvaker (Houten, Netherlands): 2 – 3 February.

DykMassan (Stockholm, Sweden): 16 – 17 March.

Additional 2019 shows will be added as they are confirmed. Check in regularly for an updated list.

We hope you’ll join us at one or more of the shows. If you’d like to partner with us in one of the PADI villages please contact your Regional Manager for more information.

Dive Opportunities in Salalah – Oman

When it comes to dive center ownership, location is everything. You need access to good diving, good transport links for customers to reach you and a demand for diving that will sustain your operation. Salalah, the capital city of Dhofar province in the Southern region of Oman, provides these qualities for PADI Dive Centers.

What can you expect from owning a dive center on Oman’s Southern coast?

Like most places on Earth, dive store owners here can expect seasonal variance. In real terms, June to September is considered the low-season due to the Indian Ocean climate change. Although monsoon rain settling over the mountains turn the typical Arabian landscape into lush green scenic views, the diving grinds to a halt. Heavy rains wash out many dive sites and turn the underwater flora from vibrant coral fields into dense kelp forests. The strong winds and limited visibility make diving opportunities in Salalah difficult in this Khareef (autumn) season.

To learn more about the unique nature of Oman’s diving, visit the PADI Blog.

Once the Khareef is over, the diving starts! As to be expected from a Gulf country, everything goes back to normal sunny days during September. The green mountains fade for another year, giving way to the beautiful wild and white beaches. Temperatures average 30 degrees and are twinned with a pleasant constant ocean breeze. The water warms up and divers are ready once more.

Where to dive and what to expect?

Mirbat – Beach Diving and shallow waters. PADI Dive Centers can conduct all of the PADI Entry Level Courses in Mirbat.

Mirbat is approximately a 45-minute drive from Salalah. It is reached by 4X4: halfway on a scenic highway, paved alongside the Dhofar’s mountains, and the remaining part of the journey is an off-road drive above sandy dunes. All the dive sites in Mirbat are characterized by easy access directly from the shore. Underwater, the abundance of sunlight and limited depth provide the perfect conditions for corals to flourish. Mirbat’s diving environment not only offers stunning coral gardens, but also a great range of fish: from the tiniest Nudibranches, Flat Worms, Shrimp and other crustaceans to Clownfish, Octopus,  Morays, Stonefish …and if you keep an eye on the blue, it is not unusual to spot different Rays, Turtles  and Barracudas.

Main diving spots are: Eagle Bay, China Wreck and Aquarium.

Salalah – Boat Diving and depths of 30m offer a wide range of diving opportunities for a PADI Dive Center

Differently from Mirbat, diving in Salalah is operated by boat – departing from the fisherman’s port, which is easily reachable with a short drive from any accommodation in town. Dive sites are all located West of the port and along the cliff’s faces. Bottom’s depth in this area averages from 7 to 30 mt. therefore dive sites vary in topography each with something unique to offer; depending from your certification level, you can choose the better depth range that fits your needs. Given the location, marine life here changes with the season, constantly offering something new to admire: there is a large variety of Morays, Crocodile fish, Cuttlefish, Frogfish, the occasional huge Turtle and gigantic – up to 2mt.-Stingrays. During the dives, it is a good habit to monitor the surface as there is always a chance to find yourself caught in a school of Sardines being hunted by Trevally or even Mantas searching for Plankton.

Main diving spots are: Port wall, Raysut point and Donkeys Head east/west

What are you waiting for?  For more information on diving in Oman, contact PADI Regional Manager Teo Brambilla

 

New, improved, 2019 PADI Show Support Pack

This year we’ve upgraded your Show Support Pack, to further assist 100% PADI Dive Centers to convert customers. Feel the power of the PADI Brand with more show support than ever before.

2019 Show Support Pack contains:

  • NEW design PADI 3.5m Beach Flag (with Pole & Base)
  • 100 PADI recycled pens
  • 50 PADI Stickers
  • PADI Course Brochures – Go Dive, Keep Diving, Teach Diving

Show Support Packs are a benefit available to 100% PADI Dive Centers. We invite you to complete the 2019 Show Support Pack Application*, return it to Amber Swan-Hutton and, once approved, the goodies are yours!

Your pack will be shipped to you with your next Sales order, or delivered to the PADI stand for you to collect if PADI is exhibiting at the same event.

* Complete and submit the PADI Show Support Pack Application with evidence of attendance at your Expo at least eight weeks prior to your Expo.

Risk Management Tips

As diving instructors, we have a duty of care to the students we take into the water. We are the experts, and therefore we need to be prepared to make decisions on behalf of our students as well as on behalf of ourselves, taking into consideration their current skill levels and general comfort.

PADI standards provide a fundamental structure within which instructors can operate. For example, the student to instructor ratios represent the maximum number of participants an instructor could take in ideal conditions – instructors can then use this to work back to an appropriate ratio for their personal environment, experience and students.

Ensuring students have appropriate equipment is another example of good risk management. Consider whether their thermal protection is appropriate for the water temperature anticipated at your prospective dive site.  Also consider their likely air consumption – students who are nervous will breathe air far more rapidly than an experienced instructor. Even in relatively shallow water, an Open Water Diver course student or Discover Scuba Diving participant may go through their air very quickly. Consider how often you will need to monitor their air supplies, taking the prevailing water conditions into account.

Sometimes the most mundane factors can be overlooked, however a thorough briefing and debriefing after each dive, along with a clear plan for how your dive will be executed, can be very important in the event of an incident underwater. In some parts of the world, a certified assistant is required by law, but in other areas the instructor is responsible for determining whether they wish to take an assistant with them. Consider your supervision of the divers at all levels, and how you will handle a large group if one of them has a problem.

PADI standards also help to enforce good risk management practices from the very start of a diver’s experience. The Statement of Risks and Liability / Liability Release & Assumption of Risk form outlines the risks inherent in scuba diving activities to your students so that they are suitably informed. Similarly, the Medical Statement is used to help screen out divers with possible medical contraindications to diving. This screening is a crucial risk management tool, and failure to use the relevant medical statement – or failure to act appropriately upon the answers from a medical statement by ensuring that written approval is obtained from a physician prior to any in-water activities if there are any “Yes” answers on the medical questionnaire – represents a serious risk to your students as well as compromising your own legal position in the event of an incident.

Adhering to standards and always being safety conscious when supervising others is your best approach to minimise the likelihood of an unfortunate incident from occurring, and ensure you provide your students with the best possible training experience.

Trade Shows: Thinking outside of the box!

During September a few PADI Dive Centers in the Middle East started exploring alternative ways to promote the diving industry to increase diver acquisition.

The idea behind that is really simple yet very effective: attending non-diving related events / trade shows with the aim of attracting enthusiastic people interested in:

  • Increasing emotional well being
  • Visiting paradisiacal places
  • Connecting with nature
  • Building long lasting friendships
  • Feeling freedom
  • Increasing confidence and self esteem

There are several similar events regularly taking place in your region, just think about this: where could I meet people matching the characteristics above? …that’s the place where you want to exhibit, share your passion and attract new souls in discovering the beauty of the underwater world!

Here below some successful examples:

Dive Holics – Jeddah – Saudi Arabia

 

attending one of the several events scheduled for The National Day

 

Nautilus Diving – Kuwait City – Kuwait

 

attending the Outdoor Sports and Safari Show

 

Gulf Marine – Abu Dhabi – United Arab Emirates

 

attending the International Hunting and Equestrian exhibition

Is Your Member Contact Information Up to Date?

Without accurate member contact information, PADI cannot reliably deliver member benefits and important standards-related information to you. Be sure to update your personal details every time your postal address, email address, phone or fax number change, and ensure that you keep your teaching location up to date.

You can view the contact information PADI currently has on file for you at any time simply by accessing the Pros area of padi.com (go to Members’ Toolbox and then click on My PADI Information to check the information). If anything is missing or inaccurate, you can easily update the information online, or if you prefer, you can contact the Customer Relations Department at your PADI Office (as listed on the site) to provide updated details. It is also important that we have your language preference on file as we will always endeavour to communicate with you in your preferred language. Where we are unable to communicate in your language of choice, we will default to English.

Why is it important to keep all personal information up to date?

  • Member benefits.

Ensures that you continue to receive all the benefits of your PADI membership, including The Undersea Journal and Training Bulletins (which are required reading for all PADI Members).

  • Region-specific information.

Allows you to access important region-specific information such as insurance requirements and information regarding local regulations pertinent to scuba diving.

  • Streamlines your communications with PADI.

Minimises any delays in processing by ensuring that any correspondence or queries relating to your membership, applications, or certifications submitted will be handled by the relevant department at the most appropriate PADI office from the outset.

  • Training hints and tips.

Updating your current contact details, including your language preference, means you will continue to receive specific regionally targeted communications, providing you with helpful training hints and tips relevant to your local teaching environment and details of upcoming training webinars such as the Training Bulletin Live, as well as information regarding the most current sales and marketing initiatives in your area.

Don’t miss out – visit the Pros’ site to check your personal contact details today!

PADI’s role in UK Heritage and Sea Use Issues

What PADI does in the background to ensure the least amount of licence burden in terms of diver access to our deeply loved wrecks and for our recreational diving activities in general.

There are thousands of wreck sites in UK Territorial Waters, caused by a long and busy history of sea-faring, inclement weather and human error. Historic England Archive alone, contains over 40,000 records of documented losses, seabed archaeological features and wreck sites. If you look at a plot of wrecks sites against a UK map, you get a hugely accurate coastal outline including major estuaries.

This provides fantastic diving opportunities but also raises issues of safety, preservation and protection, accessibility, and sustainable and respectful resource use. That’s why PADI alongside other key stakeholders (including BSAC) participates in committees, meetings and consultations with the relevant authorities both UK wide and in the devolved administrations, to best address these issues.

PADI’s role

PADI has worked hard over the years to represent the views and interests of the recreational diving community.  PADI sits on various stakeholder committees such as the Joint Nautical Archaeological Policy Committee to keep abreast of changing regulations and engages in many and varied heritage consultations and meetings to ensure our best interests are considered.  We work with the authorities (e.g. Ministry of Defence, Historic Scotland, Historic England, CADW, Crown Estates, MMO, MCA and others) to ensure diver access where possible, and to prevent (sometimes unintended) regulatory consequences that could inhibit recreational diving activities.

For example, the MMO had originally intended to make use of a lift bag a licensable activity, which some in the archaeological community had presumed would afford better protection to vulnerable historic sites.  We were able to negotiate use of a lift bag for smaller and contemporaneous objects, without the need for a licence, to ensure diver training, litter picks and recovery of diving equipment could continue without the need for a licence, whilst still maintaining the need for a licence for large scale commercial recovery or recovery of historic items.

Recently we have been working with the Crown Estate to clarify when seabed survey licences would be needed, and to ease the licence burden for recreational divers, compared to commercial operators.

 Summary

PADI advocates a look,don’t touch approach to visiting wreck sites, leaving the site in tact for others to enjoy.  We support in site preservation where possible again for future generations of divers to enjoy, and always advocate for responsible diver access, conceding that some of the most vulnerable (and unsafe, sometimes due to unexploded ordnance) sites may be off limits to us from time-to-time. Generally a licence isn’t needed to dive most of the wreck sites in the UK on a look,don’t touch basis, and licences aren’t needed for diver training activities.

For dive centres needing to place marker buoys for long periods, a self-service marine licence is available for markers placed for more than 28 days. If the marker is placed for less than 24 hours, no marine licence is needed, and for placements between 24hours and 28 days, you need to notify the MMO by completing an exemption notification form.

If you’re engaged in archaeologically activities, then you’ll need to consider a range of licencing obligations.

Here is a little reminder of just how beautiful the wreck diving  around the United Kingdom is. Located off Scotland’s Northern most tip, Orkney is home to Scapa Flow – a huge natural harbour. Here, in 1919 the entire German high sea’s fleet collectively scuttled. With 7 wrecks remaining to dive – this is one for the bucket list!

 

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