2019 Instructor Development Update

We are pleased to invite you to join us at one of the Instructor Development Update events taking place in EMEA during 2019. These events will cover the revised IDC curriculum due for launch later in the year.

These live events will give you the opportunity to be fully updated on the latest standards changes to the Instructor Development Course revision, and provide a broader overview of the exciting PADI developments planned for 2019 and beyond. As a PADI Course Director attendance at one of these events will enable you to teach the revised IDC curriculum when launched later in 2019. Places at these events are limited and all IDC Staff Instructors, Master Instructors and Course Directors are welcome to attend.This program will meet Active Status Course Director requirements and will also count towards seminar credit for master Instructor and CDTC applications.

This Update will cover the following topics:

  1. What’s New – Standards and Curriculum
  2. Revised eLearning and Digital Materials
  3. Knowledge Development Evaluation changes
  4. Confined and Open Water Evaluation changes

 Dates and locations are listed below

Date Location Price (+VAT where applicable)
3rd March 2019 Dubai, UAE £157
21st March 2019 Sliema, Malta 176 Euro
22nd March 2019 Madrid, Spain 176 Euro
30th March 2019 Lisbon, Portugal 176 Euro
13th April 2019 TBA, Cyprus 176 Euros
22nd April 2019 Hurghada, Egypt £157
28th April 2019 Santa Margharita, Italy 176 Euros
29th April 2019 Copenhagen, Denmark 176 Euros
18th May 2019 Amsterdam, Netherlands 176 Euros
30th September 2019 Moscow, Russia £157

Please register by completing this registration form and returning it to id.emea@padi.com. Please provide a telephone number that we can call you on to then take payment details over the phone.

Can’t make these dates? Don’t worry – an online update will also be available later in 2019!

** Not an IDC staff Instructor? Contact the Training Department to find out how to become one.

The Undersea Journal First Quarter 2019 – Now Available

Each quarter The Undersea Journal is filled with stories and articles that help you stay informed and inspired as a PADI Professional.

The First Quarter 2019 edition includes articles on; tips for turning students into engaged divers, how to make PADI’s marketing resources work for you, DEMA show updates, dive shops making a difference, how travel helps a commitment to dive, and many other articles.

There are several digital reading options for you to access this publication:

If you’ve opted for the printed version, it will continue to be delivered to your mailing address.

If you have any questions please contact customerservices.emea@padi.com

Go Diving 2019

PADI will be exhibiting at Go Diving, taking place at Ricoh Arena, Coventry (UK) from Friday 22nd February – Sunday 24th February 2019.

Get your exclusive discounted tickets now

Use the code PADI2018 at the check-out to receive your exclusive 10% PADI discount on tickets – use this code to get discounted tickets for Saturday and Sunday as well!

Book your tickets

Visit the PADI stand (25), where the Team and our Stand Partners will be on hand to answer all your questions and show you our latest products and features. There is more exciting news coming so please keep checking this page as it will be regularly updated.

Find out what’s on:

Over the course of the show we’ll be holding some great seminars and workshops, which we’d love you to join us for. Don’t forget to register (once open) for the Member Forum if you’re planning to attend. Spaces are limited and will be allocated on a first come, first served basis.

Date Time Seminar/Event Location
22/02/19 09:00 – 10:30 CDTC Q&A: What it takes to become a PADI Course Director  Jaguar Suite
22/02/19 10:45 – 11:30 Risk Management Jaguar Suite
22/02/19 11.45 – 12.30 Master the art of entry-level conversion Jaguar Suite
22/02/19 12.45 – 13.30 Discover a new world of opportunity through PADI Travel Jaguar Suite
22/02/19 13.45 – 15:00 Member forum Jaguar Suite
23/02/19 10.30 – 10.55 Q&A with PADI Ambassadiver Luca Hales Inspiration Stage
23/02/19 14:00 – 15:00 Member Forum Jaguar Suite
24/02/19 10:30 – 10:55 Q&A with PADI Ambassadiver Luca Hales Inspiration Stage

Member Forum 2019 at The Go Diving Show

Discover the latest news from PADI and catch up with PADI Pros in your area.

Friday 22nd February 2019 – Register Now

Saturday 23rd February 2019 – Register Now

We look forward to seeing you!

Your PADI EMEA Team

Emergency First Response Instructor Trainer Course Dates 2019

We are pleased to announce the EFR Instructor Trainer course schedule for 2019.

The EFR Instructor Trainer course includes independent online learning followed by a live interactive knowledge development and practical day conducted on the dates shown below. This programme authorises successful candidates to market and conduct EFR Instructor courses, making it particularly beneficial to those working at PADI Instructor Development Centers or those involved in the IDC process.

Paris, France 15 January 2019 French
Düsseldorf, Germany 19 January 2019 German
Bristol, UK 19 February 2019 English
Warsaw, Poland 28 February 2019 Polish
Sliema, Malta 09 March 2019 English
Jeddah, Saudi Arabia 09 March 2019 Arabic/English
Mauritius 14 March 2019 English
Johannesburg, South Africa 24 March 2019 English
Athens, Greece 31 March 2019 English
Lisbon, Portugal 31 March 2019 Portuguese
Aiguablava, Spain 14 April 2019 Spanish
Hurghada, Egypt 21 April 2019 English
Dubai, United Arab Emirates 29 April 2019 English
Tenerife, Spain 24 May 2019 English
Lanzarote, Spain 29 May 2019 English
Stockholm, Sweden 02 June 2019 Scandinavian
Helsinki, Finland 09 June 2019 English
Copenhagen, Denmark 16 June 2019 Scandinavian
Eindhoven, Netherlands 23 June 2019 English
Bristol, UK 09 September 2019 English
St Raphael, France 28 September 2019 French
Cabo de Palos 08 October 2019 Spanish
Jeddah, Saudi Arabia 12 October 2019 Arabic
Lecco, Italy 02 November 2019 Italian
Bergen, Norway 03 November 2019 Scandinavian
Kuwait 03 November 2019 Arabic/English

Prerequisites to attend one of these events include:

  • EFR Primary / Secondary Care Instructor
  • EFR Care For Children Instructor
  • 25 EFR student course completions or conducted at least 5 separate EFR courses

You can register for a EFR Instructor Trainer course by completing and returning the EFR Instructor Trainer registration form – click to download the form now:
January to May – June to December

Thinking Like a Diver When Wreck Diving

The PADI® Open Water Diver and Advanced Open Water Diver courses provide a strong foundation for teaching divers to think through diving scenarios to make sound decisions. As you mentor divers at all levels, you can build on this by providing dive scenarios relevant to the course you’re teaching, and offer questions that help them think like a diver as they evaluate the scenario and share their decisions with you. This helps you assess understanding and how they apply what they’re learning. It’s a great way to coach thoughtful and deliberate decisions. In this example, the scenario promotes using sound judgment in deciding whether to enter a wreck in the PADI Wreck Diver Specialty course.

Entering a Wreck

When a diver wants to enter a wreck, the primary-decision-making goal must always be to have a safe exit. That means being able to find a way to an exit, and being able to handle any emergency situation that could arise while in that overhead environment. Wreck-entry methods include two classifications: swim-throughs and penetrations.

  • Swim-throughs – In a swim-through, the diver enters through one opening and exits through another. In a basic swim-through, the diver will always be able to see two exit points to open water using natural light. The path between them will be free of significant obstacles, entanglements or silt. The combination of the distance to an exit point and up to the surface should not exceed 40 metres/130 feet for Advanced Open Water Divers and higher, and in other circumstances the distance should be the depth for which the diver is qualified.
  • Penetrations – In a penetration, the diver enters more than a few metres/feet into the wreck intending to return to the entry point, either because there is no other exit or the diver is not sure there is another one. The diver may go beyond the point that the entry is still clearly visible and must run a line to ensure a safe return to the exit. The path should be well lit and free of obstacles, entanglements or silt. As with swim-throughs, the distance to the exit and then to the surface should not exceed 40 metres/130 feet.

Using Sound Judgment

Either situation calls for good, reasonable judgment. Answers to the following questions can help a diver shape an appropriate decision:

  • Are the exits big enough to allow my buddy and me to swim through side by side?
  • How much light is there? Is there enough that I will always be able to see the light of the exit?
  • Is there anything big enough to be a dangerous obstacle?
  • Is there enough silt to have potentially obscure my vision to the extent I couldn’t find my way out?
  • For my planned maximum distance, is the nearest exit close enough to allow me to leave the wreck and with ample time to handle an emergency?

Also factored into the decision should be the diver’s experience, training, skill and equipment. Two different divers looking into the same wreck can make two totally different, yet appropriate decisions. For example, divers with little wreck experience entering a silty environment could obscure visibility creating a potential hazard. A diver trained in non-silting kicking techniques may not have a significant issue with silt. A diver with excellent buoyancy and trim skills can pass around obstacles that could challenge a less‑skilled diver.

Good judgment can also allow divers with more experience and training to go beyond some of the penetration guidelines. A diver with technical training, such as cave training that includes effective use of suited lights, will be able to work in areas without clear daylight.

When teaching the PADI Wreck Diver Specialty course, mentor your divers on how to think like a diver and make good decisions regarding wreck penetration based on the specific wreck circumstances and their individual training and experience. Apply similar decision-making mentorship in all courses as appropriate to the diver level, environment and course topic.

Reference the PADI Wreck Diver Instructor Guide (Product 70232) for information about this specialty diver course.

A version of this article originally appeared in the 3rd Quarter 2018 edition of The Undersea Journal®.

Why Paperwork Matters

New PADI Instructors sometimes comment that they spend more time checking paperwork than they do actually diving. So why is paperwork so important?

Firstly, it informs divers of their responsibility to be honest in disclosing and evaluating their medical condition and the risks of diving – even when operators do their very best to provide an enjoyable and relatively safe experience. It also establishes the guidelines all divers are expected to follow when participating in this transformational activity. Paperwork is also used as evidence to help defend dive professionals if an incident occurs and legal action is filed, and is usually a key requirement of your professional liability insurance policy. Each form has its own unique purpose:

Liability Release / Statement of Risks – This document explains the risks of scuba diving to the participant and ensures they are aware that it is possible for something to go wrong. It’s important here to ensure that all the blanks are filled in properly before the diver signs the form. Do not alter the document after the student signs the form, and always confirm the form is signed and dated properly.

Non-agency Acknowledgment – This form explains to your customers that PADI Member businesses are not owned by PADI, that dive professionals are not employees of PADI, and that PADI does not and cannot control the day-to-day operations and decisions of your staff and your business. As with other forms, ensure all the blanks are filled in and that the form is signed and dated.

Safe Diving Practices Statement – This document is designed to inform divers of their responsibility to dive safely – not only while a student diver, but after certification as well. Again, all blanks should be completed, and the form must be signed and dated.

The Medical Statement discusses the risks of diving and asks the diver to disclose any pre-existing medical conditions. Any ‘yes’ answer requires the approval of a physician before participating in any in-water activities. Always have the diver answer a clear ‘yes’ or ‘no’ on each line and again, sign and date the form. 

Invariably, one of your divers will answer ‘yes’ to a question on the medical statement and then want to discuss it with you, or change the answer to ‘no’. If the diver chooses to change their answer, think carefully about the reasons they might do so before allowing this.

  • Was it a simple oversight? If someone who is biologically male answers yes to, ‘are you pregnant or trying to become pregnant?’ it’s acceptable for the diver to change their answer. Be sure the diver initials and dates the change.
  • Did the diver truly misunderstand the question? If a diver initially answers ‘yes’ there must be a reason for it. Counsel the diver to be truthful about medical issues for the benefit of their loved ones, their dive buddy, and their own health and safety. If in any doubt, they should always consult a medical professional.

It is important to schedule sufficient time at the beginning of each course for student divers to fill out the required forms and for you to check them thoroughly – ensuring student divers complete paperwork properly and accurately can be key to your legal protection in the event of an incident.

Dry Suit Diving Safety Tips

Written by DAN Staff

In the Northern Hemisphere, temperatures are dropping as winter approaches and for many locations that means it’s time for dry suit diving courses to start. Dry suits are excellent exposure protection for comfort and safety. They provide warmth, redundant buoyancy and the ability to get in the water all year long, but they come with some specific safety concerns. Brush up on the hazards so you can better prepare your students for cool water diving.

Constriction Concerns

Tight wrist and neck seals aren’t just uncomfortable, they can cause real problems for divers. Neck and wrist seals should fit snugly but should not restrict blood flow. Wrist seals that are too tight can cause pain in the fingers and hands as well as numbness, tingling and loss of dexterity. They can also increase the risk of a cold injury due to decreased feeling and blood flow.

Tight neck seals have the potential to induce carotid sinus reflex. This reflex slows the diver’s heartbeat and the flow of blood to the brain and can make the diver feel dizzy or lightheaded or lose consciousness if left unchecked. You’ll size your student’s wrist and neck seals during a class, but double check them when you get to the dive site. Changes in temperature, position or stress can cause minor swelling and make a seal tight enough to cause a problem. Make sure seals are trimmed and stretched to the appropriate size before getting in the water.

Dermatological Concerns

There are many causes of diving-related skin conditions, and some of them have the potential to mask more serious concerns. This is the case with many dry suit-related dermatological issues. New divers who fail to add gas to their dry suits as they descend and experience a squeeze may get rashes, chafing or bruises as a result. While uncomfortable, these typically have no lasting ill effects. These bruises can be dramatic, however, and sometimes resemble cutaneous DCS, also known as skin bends. If one of your students appears to have bruises after a dry suit dive, always consider the possibility of DCS and respond based on the apparent symptoms (or lack thereof). Early recognition of skin bends is important and can significantly increase the likelihood of a positive outcome for an injured diver.

Urological Concerns

Urination systems are not common in many dry suits, especially rental suits,  because of hygiene concerns. However, if your student divers own suits with urination systems, it’s a good idea to teach them how to properly use the system. Pneumaturia (the passage of air during urination), urogenital infections and catheter squeeze can be caused by improper equalization or maintenance of these systems. Covering system-specific equalization, using balanced systems with one-way check valves to prevent water ingress, and covering thorough and regular cleanings as part of hygienic equipment use are critical parts of instruction.

In Celebration of the PADI Divemaster

A good divemaster is the PADI System’s “secret weapon.”

The PADI® System of diver education is built upon a foundation of learning and applying safe diving for fun and exploration. It is this system that makes PADI Pros the most sought-after professionals in the scuba diving space. While many divers may not fully appreciate the significance of the PADI Divemaster, PADI Instructors, Dive Centers and Resorts do because certified assistants are integral to the PADI System. Divemasters are a key component that allows other parts of the system to move freely and function at full capacity, working toward optimal safety and education to enhance fun and adventure.

The role of the PADI Divemaster can’t be underestimated. Divemasters are often the conduit between student divers and instructors. Sometimes students find themselves struggling with particular cognitive or motor skills. Instead of risking looking foolish in front of the instructor, reaching out to the dive master for help creates a strong bond of trust. A diver may look for assistance in mastering the physics of diving, overcoming an inwater skill, making the best equipment purchase choice, figuring out how to get to the dive site or whether to bring sunscreen. The divemaster can become the source of all kinds of dive knowledge for that diver.

What is a divemaster’s value to an instructor and dive center? From the PADI Instructor’s perspective, a good divemaster is like the best birthday present ever. Someone who anticipates needs, shares the course planning and execution load, communicates effectively and empathically with divers and works independently when needed, a divemaster is a trusted second-in-command whose presence can help ultimately contribute to effectively conducting PADI courses.

For the dive center, a good PADI Divemaster can be the store’s secret weapon; its USP (unique selling proposition) that drives repeat business. Happy customers are often repeat customers, and repeat customers translate to increased revenue. PADI Divemasters are the most versatile of creatures who may be found filling cylinders, preparing a site briefing and assisting on a training dive that morning. In the afternoon they may be out guiding certified divers or coordinating a Dive Against Debris® survey. (Does this sound like you?)

The breadth of knowledge and skills needed to become and remain a competent PADI Divemaster can’t be overstated. Everything learned and experienced at this professional level forms the foundation of the PADI Instructor you may aspire to soon become.

Earning the prized title of PADI Divemaster is pretty awesome, with much kudos attached to it, and you’ll want to hang on to it. Do this by staying current. Renew your membership each year. Read all published training and standards updates. Go to live Member Forums and network with other PADI Pros. Look for opportunities to practice and further develop your knowledge and skills. Take PADI specialty courses. You never know where or when you’ll be called upon to use your divemaster knowledge and skills, so always be ready.

Be Best. Be PADI℠.

Risk Management Tips

As diving instructors, we have a duty of care to the students we take into the water. We are the experts, and therefore we need to be prepared to make decisions on behalf of our students as well as on behalf of ourselves, taking into consideration their current skill levels and general comfort.

PADI standards provide a fundamental structure within which instructors can operate. For example, the student to instructor ratios represent the maximum number of participants an instructor could take in ideal conditions – instructors can then use this to work back to an appropriate ratio for their personal environment, experience and students.

Ensuring students have appropriate equipment is another example of good risk management. Consider whether their thermal protection is appropriate for the water temperature anticipated at your prospective dive site.  Also consider their likely air consumption – students who are nervous will breathe air far more rapidly than an experienced instructor. Even in relatively shallow water, an Open Water Diver course student or Discover Scuba Diving participant may go through their air very quickly. Consider how often you will need to monitor their air supplies, taking the prevailing water conditions into account.

Sometimes the most mundane factors can be overlooked, however a thorough briefing and debriefing after each dive, along with a clear plan for how your dive will be executed, can be very important in the event of an incident underwater. In some parts of the world, a certified assistant is required by law, but in other areas the instructor is responsible for determining whether they wish to take an assistant with them. Consider your supervision of the divers at all levels, and how you will handle a large group if one of them has a problem.

PADI standards also help to enforce good risk management practices from the very start of a diver’s experience. The Statement of Risks and Liability / Liability Release & Assumption of Risk form outlines the risks inherent in scuba diving activities to your students so that they are suitably informed. Similarly, the Medical Statement is used to help screen out divers with possible medical contraindications to diving. This screening is a crucial risk management tool, and failure to use the relevant medical statement – or failure to act appropriately upon the answers from a medical statement by ensuring that written approval is obtained from a physician prior to any in-water activities if there are any “Yes” answers on the medical questionnaire – represents a serious risk to your students as well as compromising your own legal position in the event of an incident.

Adhering to standards and always being safety conscious when supervising others is your best approach to minimise the likelihood of an unfortunate incident from occurring, and ensure you provide your students with the best possible training experience.

Business Development Opportunities using Emergency First Response Distinctives

Does your local marketplace have a need for additional first aid training that is not immediately available through the current suite of EFR courses?  As an example, is there a local regulatory first aid requirement that businesses or industries require?  You may think the EFR program cannot cover these gaps in the market but by using the Emergency First Response Distinctive Speciality route, these gaps may be filled and your first business may indeed grow.

So how does the EFR Distinctive Specialty route work?  Once you have an idea for your EFR Distinctive Speciality simply download the EFR Distinctive Template, and use it to write your own Distinctive Specialty.  The template makes writing your course a very simple process for you.

To give you some food for thought, examples of EFR Distinctives include:

  • Primary and Secondary Care at Music Festivals
  • Diabetes Awareness and Treatment

Once you have written your EFR Distinctive Speciality, email it to us for review.

A Training Consultant will work with you to answer any questions you have and provide feedback, should your outline need revision.  Once you and your Training Consultant are satisfied with the Distinctive Specialty, the Outline, and application, will be submitted to a review panel for consideration.

It’s that simple.  EFR Distinctives are an excellent opportunity to add something unique, that prospective clients need or want, to your business model and will support your business plans for your EFR business growth.