Join a PADI Advanced Training Academy Near You

Drive your dive business forward

The PADI Advanced Training Academy is conducted over one day and delivers an exciting, educational and highly interactive program, delivered by experts and affording you the opportunity to network with industry peers. Walk away with new skills and knowledge that will increase your certifications and bottom line profit.

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Take your next steps and claim your 5 for 4 offer

Take your next steps and claim your 5 for 4 offer – That’s 5 Specialty Instructor credentials for the price of 4!

More scuba diving and more fun sharing what interests you – that’s what teaching specialty diver courses is all about. The best way to learn how to make your specialty diver courses really special is to take a Specialty Instructor course from your local PADI Course Director. Specialty Instructor courses provide teaching tips and hands-on experience that you can implement right away. With over 25 PADI Specialty Diver courses, and numerous distinctive specialties, you have lots to choose from – so get going!

All PADI Instructors will benefit from taking Specialty Instructor training courses, especially those who are ready to step up to the Master Scuba Diver Trainer (MSDT) rating, which requires at least five PADI Specialty Instructor certifications.

Important: This offer is only applicable on a single Specialty Instructor Application and all five specialty instructor ratings must be applied for at the same time. You are also eligible for 10 specialties for the price of 8 or 15 specialties for the price of 12.

Find your local PADI Five Star Instructor Development Center

If you have questions and would like more information, please contact customerservices.emea@padi.com

Congratulations to our 2018 PADI Elite Instructor Award Recipients

With the New Year well under way, we would like to congratulate all our 2018 PADI Elite Instructor Award recipients. These PADI Elite Instructor Award recipients are the top certifying PADI Instructors who have received an Elite Instructor Award for issuing 50, 100, 150, 200 or more than 300 certifications throughout 2018.

The Elite Instructor Award distinguishes PADI professionals by highlighting their experience as PADI Members and gives them the means to promote their elite status to student divers, potential students, prospective employers and others.

Elite Instructor Award recipients will receive an acknowledgement letter and recognition certificate (signed by PADI President and CEO Dr. Drew Richardson), a decal to add to their instructor cards, and an e-badge they may use on emails, websites, blogs and social media pages.

Elite Instructors may authorize PADI Dive Centres or Resorts with which they associate, to display their Elite Instructor Award on the business’ digital site as well.

VIEW THE 2018 ELITE INSTRUCTOR AWARD WINNERS

For more information including qualifying certifications, visit the PADI Elite Instructor Award page on the PADI Pros’ Site. To see your current certifications count, view your Students Count Report.

Avoid the Trap

Apart from medical issues, what do you think most causes or contributes to serious dive incidents? Gear failure? Conditions? Panic? No, while these can all be factors, the number one cause or contributor in serious accidents is bad decisions. When we make good choices and follow accepted diving practices, unpleasant experiences are very rare, even when the unexpected happens. But, studies show that when divers make poor decisions, the probability of injury, death or a close call goes up disproportionately.

This shouldn’t be surprising, but here’s the important detail: It’s rarely errors, but violations that cause or contribute to these incidents. In this context, an error is unintentionally straying from accepted practices, whereas a violation is deliberately doing so.


In some dive incident reports, the violations are so extreme that we can only scratch our heads and ask, “What were they thinking?” But in others incidents, the violations are more understandable, at least in hindsight, and if we’re honest, we’ve all been there. It goes something like this: Pat Diver’s on a boat about to splash, and, wouldn’t you know it, Pat has left the emergency whistle normally always attached to the BCD, at home, next to the sink after washing it. Pat can even see it mentally.  A quick check finds no spares onboard . . . and that’s when Pat decides to dive anyway. We’re not going far, it’s flat calm, my buddy has one, there’s no current etc. . . . And, Pat probably gets away with it because in truth, on most dives you don’t need your whistle, and the same is true for other things, like your alternate air source. More often than not, predive checks don’t find problems and reserve gas never leaves your cylinder. Many accepted diving practices we follow on every dive (or should) prove unnecessary on most of our dives.

And that’s the trap. Since nothing bad happened, next time Pat forgets a whistle, or alternate or doesn’t want to bother with a predive check, Pat dives and gets away with it again. After a while, not having required gear, pushing limits, skipping checks etc. is Pat’s new MO.  Pat even begins to say things like “you just need it for training,” since nothing bad has happened after all of these dives, they must be unnecessary, right? (The human factors term for this is normalization of deviance. Logically, we know that eventually a whistle, alternate, reserve, predive check, etc. would make a big difference – maybe even a life-saving difference – and Pat has a bad day or worse. Problem is, it could be the next dive or next 200th; there’s no way to know.


Thinking Differently

Since the trap is that violations seem reasonable in the moment, the solution is a different mindset. Thinking like divers (remember that from your PADI Advanced Open Water Diver course?), the mindset we want builds on the primary objective of every dive: for everyone to return safely. Then we:

Question the violation, not the dive practice. Violations assume that the dive practice is flawed under the circumstances. Because someone likely got hurt or died for us to learn a dive practice, and because there is usually no warning that this is the dive when it will keep us out of trouble, reject that assumption. The data show that violations are flawed, even if divers get away with them frequently.

Remove incentives. Many violations happen for convenience or not missing a dive, so have choices. Spare gear, reasonable time, alternative dive sites, etc. remove incentives. There’s no incentive to dive with a short fill if there’s full cylinder available. There’s no incentive to skip a proper predive check if there’s no rush to get in the water. There’s no incentive to dive in terrible conditions if there’s something else fun to do together.

Be firm. When we rationalize, it’s human nature to look for agreement, so we can help each other by politely not agreeing, ideally followed by a solution in keeping with accepted practices. “No, I disagree. Swimming back alone violates safe diving practices. How about this – we can all swim back together, then those who want to continue . . . ”


Be a role model. We’re less likely to violate safe diving practices when we dive with role model leaders and when we realize that we’re role models ourselves, whether we want to be or not. Role model divers continue their education, keep up with the latest data from sources like DAN, and keep first aid/CPRRescue Diver and oxygen skills current because they know that even without violations, incidents can still happen. As German theologian Albert Schweitzer said, “Setting an example is not the main thing in influencing others. It is the only thing.”

Dr. Drew Richardson
PADI President & CEO

Teaching Diving is Teaching Life

As early as the 1950’s, scientific research began demonstrating that sports have significant benefits. Early research focused on physical activity in team sports, but today, research is broader and looks at mental as well as physical changes. It also looks beyond team sports to include adventure/extreme sports like mountain biking, kayaking, base jumping, and (of course) scuba. The latest findings suggest that sports that give an adrenaline rush develop skills that apply to everyday life.

Life Lessons: Confidence, Self-Reliance, Self-Control

Adventure sports tend to be more individual and have a perceived higher degree of risk than competitive team sports. This helps participants learn to rely on themselves as they stretch beyond their comfort zones, which builds confidence. But, many adventure sports (including diving) have strong teamwork aspects, which develops socialisation and cooperative interaction skills much as do team sports.

Anecdotal and research evidence finds that adventure-sport participants tend to be calmer, more confident, mentally stronger, more self-disciplined and better able to handle stress situations. One study found that extreme sport participants who experience fear and close calls not only exhibited more ability to manage fear, but also more humility.

Connected to the Environment

Unlike field/stadium team sports, which are usually played on constructed ball fields, stadiums and parks, adventure sports take participants into the environment because almost all of them require relatively natural settings. The benefit of this is that adventure-sport participants tend to develop a positive, protective relationship with the environment because their activities are integrated with it rather than separated from it.

This social benefit, many argue, develops learners who are environmentally aware and sensitive, which is important because our collective future depends upon our relationship with the environment.

Old Dogs Do Learn New Tricks

Physical activity is known to benefit our health in our senior years, and now it seems that suitable mental challenges prevent – and in some ways can reverse – mental decline. Studies find that older adults who keep learning new skills tend to stay more active and enjoy better cognitive and memory performance. But, research finds that this learning must be challenging with demands on both thinking and memory.

Most adventure sports require new skills, planning, assessing conditions and social interaction, making them good fits for the purpose of helping slow mental decline in older adults, as well as providing physical activity. The limiting factor for seniors is the ability to meet the physical requirements of a given adventure sport.

The Takeaways

Of all adventure sports, diving is probably open to the widest range of age, culture, physical abilities and other demographic characteristics. It is likely the adventure sport with the widest access for senior participants. These characteristics make diving suited to offering benefits to divergent markets with differing, specialised interests and needs.

  1. You’re not just “teaching scuba.” You’re teaching skills that have broad personal applications. This can be a useful message when presenting learn-to-dive opportunities to different groups as well as individuals.
  2. Market these “extra” benefits. Especially with institutions like youth, senior and environmental groups, it is exactly these developmental and environmental connections that add a reason to participate in diving or allow you to offer it to their members.
  3. Target the “nonteamers.” Scuba will appeal to many people who can’t or don’t want to participate in team sports, yet offer many of the same benefits.
  4. Target the “teamers,” too. Diving will also appeal to people who do like team sports. Scuba gives such groups something more individual in nature that they can do together, with some distinct challenges and benefits.
  5. Continue education. Senior divers may feel like they “just” want to be PADI® Open Water Divers, but continuing education offers new, deeper mental challenges, socialization and physical activity – all associated with benefits for older adults.

References

  • Association for Psychological Science (2013) Learning new skills keeps an aging mind sharp. (psychologicalscience.org/news/releases/learning-new-skills-keeps-an-aging-mind-sharp.html)
  • English Outdoor Council. Values and benefits of outdoor education, training and recreation. (englishoutdoorcouncil.org/Values_and_benefits.htm)
  • Adventure sports. (learn.healthpro.com/adventure-sports/)
  • Mathis, B. (2017) What are the benefits of adventure sports? (livestrong.com/article/149821-what-are-the-benefits-of-adventure-sports/)
  • OMG Lifestyle (2017) Major health benefits of adventure sports. (omglifestyle.co.uk/major-health-benefits-adventure-sports/)
  • Scott, K. (2015) The surprising benefits of extreme sports. (coach.nine.com.au/2015/10/19/13/34/the-surprising-benefits-of-extreme-sports)
  • Smart Health Shop (2018) Surprising mental benefits of doing extreme sports. (blog.smarthealthshop.com/2018/04/10/surprising-mental-benefits-of-doing-extreme-sports/)
  • The health benefits of sport and physical activity.(sportanddev.org/en/learn-more/health/health-benefits-sport-and-physical-activity)
  • Vitelli, R (2012) Can lifelong learning help as we age? (psychologytoday.com/us/blog/media-spotlight/201210/can-lifelong-learning-help-we-age)
  • The Wellness Seeker, Extreme sports benefits and health promotion. (thewellnessseeker.com/extreme-sports-benefits-health-promotion/)

A version of this article originally appeared in the 4th Quarter 2018 edition of The Undersea Journal®.

Help Divers ReActivate

Divers know when they’ve been out of the water for too long and need a refresher – you can help.

Keep skills proficient, review key dive information, and seek a refresher after a period of inactivity are all phrases divers hear throughout their training. It’s solid advice and not only important for diver safety, but also for comfort and enjoyment in the water. Some divers do refreshers every year. For others, it’s an upcoming trip to an exotic dive destination that motivates them to refresh their dive skills after several dry years.

One of the best features of the PADI ReActivate® program is that it accommodates everyone who wants a refresher, whether it’s a minor yearly tune-up or a major dive skills and knowledge review. ReActivate is convenient, prescriptive and allows each diver to progress at a personal pace. You provide only as much guidance and coaching as the diver needs.

How It’s Done

1. Have divers complete a knowledge refresher with the PADI® ReActivate digital product and schedule a water skills session in either confined or open water.

2. During a predive interview, check diver log books and ask these questions:

  • How many dives have you made, and in what conditions and environments?
  • When and where were your last dives?
  • How did your last dives go? What would help you to improve them?
  • What skills do you want to practice?

3. In your briefing, reminds divers to do a predive safety check and go over special entry and exit techniques, if any, for the dive site.

4. Observe divers before and during the dive, and based on your observations, provide reminders, demonstrations, adjustments and other remediation as needed to restore mastery.

5. Specifically demonstrate and practice these skills:

  • Remove, replace and clear the mask
  • Neutral buoyancy and hovering
  • Emergency weight drop
  • Alternate air source ascent
  • Controlled emergency swimming ascent (in confined water only)

6. Have divers practice any skills they said they wanted to practice during the predive interview and those that require more practice based on your observations.

Use your judgment to make the dive prescriptive to what divers need. Also make it enjoyable. Divers should not only gain confidence in diving again, but also be enthused about new adventures. Remember that one good dive deserves another so offer additional dive opportunities.

A PADI Diver who completes both the knowledge and dive skills review earns a replacement certification card with a ReActivate date. Log on to the PADI Pros’ Site and go to the Online Processing Center to request a replacement card. A ReActivate date can be placed on any PADI diving certification card the diver has earned, including specialty diver ratings.

Use ReActivate and your divemastering skills to help divers get back in the water. Check the ReActivate Instructor Guide in your PADI Instructor Manual and the ReActivate pages in PADI’s Guide to Teaching for more details.

2019 Instructor Development Update

We are pleased to invite you to join us at one of the Instructor Development Update events taking place in EMEA during 2019. These events will cover the revised IDC curriculum due for launch later in the year.

These live events will give you the opportunity to be fully updated on the latest standards changes to the Instructor Development Course revision, and provide a broader overview of the exciting PADI developments planned for 2019 and beyond. As a PADI Course Director, attendance at one of these events will provide you with credit towards the 2020 ID Update which will include essential information on the revised curriculum due for launch later in 2019. Places at these events are limited and all IDC Staff Instructors, Master Instructors and Course Directors are welcome to attend. This program will meet Active Status Course Director requirements and will also count towards seminar credit for master Instructor and CDTC applications.

This Update will cover the following topics:

  1. What’s New – Standards and Curriculum
  2. Revised eLearning and Digital Materials
  3. Knowledge Development Evaluation changes
  4. Confined and Open Water Evaluation changes

 Dates and locations are listed below

DateLocationPrice (+VAT where applicable)
3rd March 2019Dubai, UAE£157
21st March 2019Sliema, Malta176 Euro
22nd March 2019Madrid, Spain176 Euro
30th March 2019Lisbon, Portugal176 Euro
22nd April 2019Hurghada, Egypt£157
24th April 2019Dahab, Egypt£157
28th April 2019Santa Margharita, Italy176 Euros
29th April 2019Copenhagen, Denmark176 Euros
18th May 2019Amsterdam, Netherlands176 Euros
22nd May 2019Paphos, Cyprus176 Euros
30th May 2019Lanzarote, Canary Islands176 Euros
30th September 2019Moscow, Russia£157

Please register by completing this registration form and returning it to id.emea@padi.com. Please provide a telephone number that we can call you on to then take payment details over the phone.

Can’t make these dates? Don’t worry – an online update will also be available later in 2019 to retain Active Teaching Status! Please note: Attending an online update will not enable you to teach the revised IDC curriculum when launched in 2019. CDs have a choice to attend a Live update in either 2019 or 2020, to be able to teach the new curriculum. Only after completing a Live update can a CD teach the new curriculum.

** Not an IDC staff Instructor? Contact the Training Department to find out how to become one.

The Undersea Journal First Quarter 2019 – Now Available

Each quarter The Undersea Journal is filled with stories and articles that help you stay informed and inspired as a PADI Professional.

The First Quarter 2019 edition includes articles on; tips for turning students into engaged divers, how to make PADI’s marketing resources work for you, DEMA show updates, dive shops making a difference, how travel helps a commitment to dive, and many other articles.

There are several digital reading options for you to access this publication:

If you’ve opted for the printed version, it will continue to be delivered to your mailing address.

If you have any questions please contact customerservices.emea@padi.com