PADI Women’s Dive Day 2018 at Freestyle Divers UAE

Successful turnout at Freestyle Divers – in Dibba – to celebrate the 2018 edition of PADI Women’s Dive Day.

More than 30 divers joined Freestyle’s Team diving in different locations of the East Coast, like Dibba Rock and Inchcape, for a total of over 100 dives throughout the day.

Guest Star, PADI Ambassadiver Slava Noor, was active part of the event:  not only by joining the diving trips but also by giving a speech on how she became a diver and her journey to become PADI AmbassaDiver, highlighting how it helped her to become a better and more confident person. Slava took also the opportunity to talk about Ocean pollution and which measures can be taken, as divers, to reduce our footprint.

The day was quite inspiring for some of the participants and, as a result, 5 people joined the PADI Discover Scuba Diving program organized during the day, 6 ladies subscribed for the PADI Open Water Course starting next month, one registration for a PADI Advanced Open Water Course and …the icing on the cake, 4 ladies who decided to pursue the professional career and join October’s PADI Instructor Development Course!

Congratulations Freestyle Divers for the successful event: keep up the good work!

PADI Women’s Dive Day 2018 Events to Remember

On Saturday, 21 July, PADI® Dive Centers, Resorts and Professional Members hosted more than a 1000 events in 104 countries across the globe for the Fourth Annual PADI Women’s Dive Day. With record-breaking participation, the day brought together thousands of divers of all genders, ages and experience levels.

Here’s a look at some locations that helped make this year extra special.

United Kingdom. British PADI Dive Centers led the way this year when it came to creativity and inclusion for all. Fifth Point Diving dedicated an entire week to underwater photography workshops, snorkel safaris and an impromptu Dive Against Debris, before culminating with the PADI Women’s Dive Day event. Taking inclusion one step further, Vivian Dive Centre combined PADI Women’s Dive Day with their own inaugural event, Scuba Pride. Visitors had the chance to converse with fellow divers, retailers and PADI. Experience a wide range of scuba activities from Discover Scuba Diving to Tec and Sidemount try dives. If visitors weren’t in the water, they were found in the photo booth, getting their faces painted or at the BBQ.

Sharm el Sheikh, Egypt. *Allergen alert – this story contains peanuts. Camel Dive Club prides itself on being an ideal choice for solo female divers, so PADI Women’s Dive Day is the perfect back drop for like-minded travellers. On the day itself, Camel Dive Club organised a Dive Against Debris with over 25 participants followed by a special rendition of their weekly Divers’ Night. Among the girl power anthems blasting out from the speakers, the celebrations descended into chaos as the cashews and pistachios went flying in the first ever Women’s Dive Day Peanut Fight.

Sicily, Italy. The crystalline waters of Sicily provided the perfect playground for Sea Spirit to pay homage to their female staff members and divers. Female professionals make up over 50% of the Sea Spirit team, taking on roles such as instructors, management, administration and boat skipper. 24 divers submerged for an incredible dive, all showing their support for the female dive community by wearing pink t-shirts.

Maldives. 50 Maldivian female divers splash down with Moodhu Goyye. The Maldivian dive community on Facebook, created by PADI Course Director Zoona Naseem, hosted the most colourful Maldivian PADI Women’s Dive Day yet. Attracting 50 female certified divers to share their love for scuba diving with non-divers to inspire the ever growing community. 6 PADI Dive Centers came together to make this a truly unforgettable day of diving in the Maldives.

Switzerland. Although landlocked, the diving opportunities appear to be endless. Lake diving in the summer, ice diving in the winter and going with the flow down a river. And it’s in a river we found Valeria Machado hosting a Women’s Dive Day event. The enthusiastic photographer had long dreamt of displaying her photography in the Verzasca River and finally realised that dream on 21st July. With assistance from PADI Members and Dive Centers, the underwater gallery created a stunning spectacle to showcase her images.

South Africa. Pro Dive in Port Elizabeth summed up their PADI Women’s Dive Day perfectly with a few simple words, “sharing what we love – sun, sea, salty hair & ocean hair – mermaids’ life.” Their boat dive followed by lunch helped bring together their female dive community and will inspire friends of friends and family members to try scuba diving.

Turkey. For a country where the dive population was predominately male until the 1990s, it was big news for a woman to get certified – it might even warrant a write-up in the newspaper. Thanks to the introduction of multiple PADI dive operators and instructors to the area, the number of female divers has continue to rise. For this Women’s Dive Day, the participation was impressive with dive events held throughout the country for both divers and non-divers.

United Arab Emirates. Freestyle Divers, based on the coast in Dibba Al-Fujairah, got their divers in the Women’s Dive Day spirit with shore dives, boat dives and Discover Scuba Diving experiences held throughout the day. To keep things interesting, they also hosted an underwater treasure hunt and gifted their divers with PADI grab bags.

There were many other incredible events all around the region and world. You can see more event photos on the PADI Facebook page or search for #PADIWomen on social media.

If you held an event this year, remember to follow up with all your event participants. A simple “thanks for diving with us” message keeps divers engaged and encourages them to continue diving with you. Don’t forget to include a call to action.

Mark your calendars – Next year’s PADI Women’s Dive Day is scheduled for Saturday, 20 July 2019.

PADI Women’s Dive Day – An Interview with PADI CD Marlies Lang

When did you fall in love with the ocean?

I did my open water course in the middle of winter in New Zealand and confined training was done in a swimming pool – the first open water dive literally blew my mind – the colours of the marine world were amazing and the topography stunning – I felt like discovering a whole new world…

 

How did you start diving?

I joined a PADI Open Water Course in 1995 in the middle of winter in New Zealand. I still remember loving the feeling of being weightless under water – it changed my life for the better.

When did you become a PADI instructor?

After working as a Divemaster for a while I felt it was time to better myself and become a PADI instructor – little did I know then how much I would enjoy teaching people how to dive – a hobby turned into a passion!

Why did you become a PADI Course Director?

Working as a PADI instructor and Staff instructor for 8 years I wanted to take another step up and trained to be a PADI Course Director. I know for sure that I have the best job in the world not only being able to introduce people to the wonders of the underwater world but also train dive professionals and prepare them to become an instructor themselves to LIVE THE DREAM AND TRAVEL THE WORLD!

What would you tell our readers especially women who are interested in diving?

Come and try diving today!! You will not be disappointed of what the silent world has to offer – the PADIs woman’s dive day is the perfect opportunity to finally make it happen!  Come and dive with us at Sea Dancer Dive centre here in Dahab!

Why did you chose to work in Egypt as a PADI professional?

I fell in love with Egypt 16 years ago – the people – the culture – the nature – and specially of course the magic that happens under water! Here in Dahab the wonderful coral reefs are only footsteps away from the shore and with dive sites like the Famous Blue Hole and The Canyon one of the top diving destinations in the world. Come and see it for yourself – and all you woman out there that are curious but not sure – try diving on PADI’s woman’s dive day!!

See you under water

Marlies Lang

PADI Course Director

PADI Women’s Dive Day – An Interview with PADI CD Jilly Healey

My name is Jilly, I am a PADI Course Director and here is my story. I am originally from Manchester, England but I have lived in Egypt for nearly half my life. From the moment I arrived here, it felt like coming home.

My story really begins about 20 years before I was born; my mum lived in Fayed, Ismailia as a little girl so I always had a fascination with Egypt as a child. In 1995, my mum returned to live in Sharm El Sheikh and got a job in a hotel here. In November 1998 after a busy year running my own bar, I was in desperate need of a holiday so I popped over to visit mum for a couple of weeks.

I love my mum to bits she is my best friend and an inspiration to me, but she is a sneaky one, she told me she had booked me onto the PADI Open Water course, to which I told her no I wasn’t interested, I wanted to sit on a beach and relax. She told me she had paid for it and “ tough luck young lady you are going to do it because I have bought it for your Christmas present” what do you say to that apart from “ Yes mum, Thank you Mum” and off I trundled to the dive centre.

I have always been a water babe but wouldn’t say I was a great fan of the sea, we had a speed boat as a kid so was always around water but I had this belief there was a giant octopus in the sea that would get me ( I had a big brother so I wonder where I got that kind of info from, probably the same place as the crocodiles at the side of my bed and the lion in the cupboard in the bathroom!) So did I fall in love with the ocean straight away, no not at all, but I did fall in love with my dive instructor, he spoke English with a French accent that made me go weak at the knees.

I still don’t think I particularly liked diving whilst doing my open water, I was scared of fish (big fish were fine, it was the little ones that moved fast that scared me), the dive tables were just confusing, I couldn’t get to grips with the compass ( honestly my buddy and I winged that one- I have never told my instructor that, hope he doesn’t read this!) but I got through it. Once I passed my mum admitted she had lied to me and that she had got the course for free because she worked at the hotel but knew if she told me she hadn’t paid for it I wouldn’t have gone, see I told you she was sneaky.

Something in the Open Water must have peaked my interest because 2 days later, having a French PADI Instructor as my new boyfriend I started my PADI Advanced course. This is when I fell in love with it all. I left Sharm after that holiday sold my bar and was back doing my PADI Rescue course on January 20th 1999. By the end of that year, I was a PADI Instructor – Thanks Mum.

At that time, as a female in a male orientated career and environment I had to work hard to prove myself, I think the women that came before me paved a way for me and I would like to think I did the same for women who came after me. I had to prove to the male Egyptian boat crews that I was strong enough to tie mooring lines as good as any of my male counterparts, that I would carry the tanks and equipment and in the water I was a good as anyone else, the crews watched me and spoke amongst themselves and I gained their respect. I often get asked by women how I have dealt with being female and working in Egypt, my answer is I work alongside the boat crews as a unit, I chat with the skippers when deciding dive sites, they know the sea much better than I ever will, I help the deckhands where I can, I don’t think it matters whether you are male or female it matters whether you have the respect for each other and are willing to work hard and I have proved that I do and I can. I strongly believe in being a role model to others and feel if you work hard others will follow your lead. I love diving in Egypt, the reefs are so beautiful and plentiful, everywhere I go around the world I look at it and think could I dive here every day and not get bored, so far only Sharm El Sheikh has captivated me enough to stay for 19 years.

I became a PADI Course Director after helping with many Instructor Development Courses, I had an exceptional boss of the dive centre I work at and he was the best Course Director who encouraged all his IDC Staff Instructors to continue up the PADI ladder. During one IDC, we had about 18 students, there were 3 Course Directors on that course with my boss being the lead Course Director, I was the only Staff Instructor and all the students kept asking me why I wasn’t a Course Director, they got me thinking. I just did not feel confident in myself to do it, so I went to my boss and he told me to believe in myself, he told me I was more than ready. With the push from him and the support of my boyfriend (not the French Instructor, I met a new one, of course he is an Instructor as well, us divers talk nothing but diving and fish who else would listen to us but other divers) I went to my PADI Course Director Course.

I will never forget the moment I realised I had passed that course, I looked in the mirror laughing and crying at the same time saying to myself, you are a PADI Course Director.

Ladies the moral of my story is that you may get pushed to do things outside of your comfort zone and sometimes you may not have the confidence in yourself to do them but believe in yourself, embrace the challenges as they may change your life – mine did. In the water it does not matter if you are male or female, the fish do not care, all that matters is that you love it.

My mum’s gift opened up a completely new world for me, it is a world that keeps giving every day and I have never looked back.

 

PADI Women’s Dive Day – An Interview with PADI Instructor Nouf AlOsaimi

Why and how did you become a PADI Diver?

My story begins back in 2008 in Manchester, UK, when I was completing my undergraduate degree in Tourism. Wanting a break to seek out the sun and sand, I headed to Sharm El Sheikh in Egypt. It was here that I first encountered the underwater world by way of a PADI Discover Scuba Diving experience, which was truly life changing. I went back in 2009 where I completed the PADI Open Water course. Going on to complete my PADI Divemaster course rating in Jeddah, Saudi Arabia in 2011 I then spent a full 12 months working as a Divemaster and underwater photographer back in Sharm.

I am now a PADI Master Scuba Diver Trainer, focused on educating and teaching women to learn to dive within Saudi.

What does PADI mean to you?

Passion, fun, education, life changing, community, adventure and family.

 What does it mean to you to be a female diver?

To me, being a female diver means the world. Becoming a diver in a conservative society, where all sports are dominated by men, was a huge challenge for me. Many females reject this incredible sport because it involves men teaching them how to dive.

I built a female training group specifically to train and educate women about the importance of the sea and the environment. When you dive you see how many different types of creatures are living together in a uniquely balanced ecosystem. We must not spoil it. Diving empowers me and heightens my sense of responsibility towards the environment in general. I have trained many female divers, and there are more on the waiting list. They are happy to see a female instructor that teaches them about the importance of the sea and why we should dive.

What is your favourite dive site?

Shark & Yolanda Reef in Sharm El Sheikh, Egypt!

 What’s your dream dive?

A dive full of sharks in the Galapagos!

 

 What do you feel are the most important challenges and opportunities facing women in diving?

The scuba diving sector is growing, especially with the current movement of woman empowerment around the world. However, the major challenge is fear of the ocean, which we are working on by increasing awareness about the beauty of underwater world and sharing experiences with other females through word of mouth and social media.

 How can we get more women in the water and involved in the dive community?

I believe diving is a meditation sport, it can heal the souls, and many from our community of females diver’s agree with this. Once you are underwater you disconnect from the busy world by diving into the blue and connecting with nature. Females need to understand the magical and breath-taking experience that wasn’t easily available before.  With the growing number of empowered females who are looking for new adventures and activities, it’s our duty to take part of this change and motivate them to join the underwater world.

 Tips to women thinking about a career in diving?

Choosing a diving career means that you do what you love and love what you do! The more dives you make with different instructors and the more skills and experiences you gain. Sadly, many movies have shown the negative side of the sea, making sharks the ultimate enemy underwater. We must show the positive side of the sea to newbies by becoming ocean ambassadors, so they can appreciate the underwater environment more.

PADI Women’s Dive Day – An Interview with PADI CD Anna Schmitt

In celebration of PADI Women’s dive day, here is an interview with PADI Course Director Anna Schmitt.

Even though Anna hasn’t been the longest serving PADI course director, but Anna managed to establish her name very quickly as a PADI Course Director in Egypt in few years. Anna has been a PADI member for 8 years and a PADI Course Director for 3 years, which proves that working hard pays off.

 

When did you fall in love with the ocean?

 

Falling in love with the ocean is not a one off, it is forever.

I still do, every single time with the eyes of new students experiencing these moments of falling in love with the undersea world. It gives me huge satisfaction witnessing again and again the beginnings of their love stories with the ocean.

How did you start diving?

 

Life is so unpredictable: we can plan and schedule day after day, weeks, months, years, vacations, what and when we want to buy and what to achieve in life; but often it is not enough.

One small decision or event can create a big change in our life. For almost 6 years after school, I was studying in Airspace University, became an engineer and was successfully working in it for 3 years. I have to say I really loved my job.

Diving? Never even thought about it. How? My eyes were always looking in the sky, all goals and plans were there.  However, there is always a but in the story…

Vacation, Egypt, Red Sea – the best combination for a new experience, which ultimately changed my life.

From the first moment breathing under the water, I knew that this would be a life changing experience, a new me was born. I found the easiest way to experience another world without leaving our planet. While looking in the sky, I found all I was dreaming of beneath the waves.

When I started the OWD course, I knew that I would go further and 6 months later, I became a Divemaster, taking the first step in my professional career.

 

 

When did you become a PADI instructor?

After becoming a Divemaster I had one year of intense work in the diving center: guiding, assisting courses, sharing my experiences and enhancing my skills every day. The milestone of becoming a PADI Instructor was accomplished in 2011. It was a big and necessary step, which gave me many more opportunities. 3 months later, I was ready to take the next challenge.

Why did you become a PADI Course Director?

Why – that is a good question. We should always move forward and challenge ourselves to widen our horizons. First, I believe we learn the most going through them, with every lesson we take with an open mind we become a better version of ourselves. We evolve and it gives us a greater chance to make a better tomorrow.

 

Being a PADI Course Director in Egypt allows me to influence the international diving community, building up the demand for quality Instructor training, raising environmental awareness and so much more.

 

What would you tell our readers especially women who are interested in diving?

No matter when and where we start, we can always transform our dreams to goals and to achieve them once they are set. All we need is to do our best, every single day. Sometimes we feel that steps to our goals are too slow or too small, but they are always forward, that is what matters.

The first step is the hardest part. Do not be shy or afraid that you are too old, too young, can’t swim, never snorkelled – we have only one life, never give up on your dreams, it is always worth it to try. I truly believe each woman was made for diving; each woman can be an amazing diver and inspiring educator. We all have this love of nature which lives inside us, and that’s what the ocean needs… Oceans need women to take care of them.

 

Why did you chose to work in Egypt as a PADI professional?

Work, not exactly the word I would use. Diving is first my passion, my living style, my motivation, my inspiration. I was born here as a diver in the beautiful Red Sea. It is unspeakably beautiful which can teach me so much with every single dive. It is the best place to welcome new encounters in my life. Great weather conditions, warm waters and perfect geographical location – these are just additional benefits.

PADI Women’s Dive Day – An Interview with PADI CD Nancy Abd El Wahab

In celebration of PADI Women’s dive day, here is an interview with PADI Course Director Mancy Abd El Wahab, who has been a PADI member since 1994 and a PADI Course Director since 2002.

 

When did you fall in love with the ocean?

As long as I can remember! I always loved the water and spent the summers around lakes and the North Sea coast in Germany. Of course watching documentaries about the ocean, such as ones from Hans Hass, made me curios about the ocean and everything in it. However, what made me really fall in love with the ocean was the first time I went snorkelling as a child in the Mediterranean Sea in Spain. The amazing blue colours of the ocean and being able to see what’s below – that was an unbelievable experience and also where my “love story” with the ocean began.

How did you start diving?

When I was a teenager I was a competitive swimmer and water always felt like a place I wanted to be. Due to my fascination with the underwater world my parents gave me a diving course as a Christmas present at the beginning of the 1990’s. I remember it vividly; it was January and we went to a lake in Germany, the water was 4 degrees cold, there was no visibility and I was wearing a suit that was miles too big for me. Nevertheless, I absolutely loved it and continued learning more about diving until this day.

When did you become a PADI instructor?

I was working as a PADI Divemaster in Dahab in the early 1990’s and gained some experience. After working for one year as a guide it was time to develop and I did my IDC in 1995 in Sharm El Sheikh. It was an intense course and I was very lucky that I had a wonderful and very professional PADI Course Director, who became my mentor for many years after.

Why did you become a PADI Course Director?

Personally, I always like to develop and to learn new things. Working for a long time as an Instructor and living in one of the top spots of the diving industry it was a natural process to continue my education. I was very lucky that I had the chance to work as a Staff Instructor on many IDC’s before I applied for my Course Director Training Course in 2002. Becoming a PADI Course Director was a great dream of mine. It is such a rewarding job teaching people to make a living from diving. It is a high level of training and I love to share the experience I gained over the last 24 years in the diving industry.

 

What would you tell our readers especially women who are interested in diving?

I think nowadays more women are diving and are interested in diving. However, I still see many countries where female divers are an exception because of cultures where it is not common that men and women participate in the same activities. I encourage women from these cultures to look out for professional female Divemasters and Instructors if they are interested in diving. Diving is a fantastic sport where you can meet many different people who have a love for the ocean. But its not only a sport, it’s a life style and divers are very social people. Going on a diving holiday is both seeing amazing things underwater and spending a great time with people who have the same passion. I would suggest for women to find a female mentor – like a Divemaster or Instructor. I taught many women diving and it was great to be their mentor. Many of them became PADI Divemasters or PADI Instructor by themselves and they now carry the passion we share for diving to other women who are just starting to dive.

Why did you choose to work in Egypt as a PADI professional?

The Red Sea is one of the top destinations for diving worldwide. I love the amazing underwater world of the coral reefs of Sinai and the very unique dive sites like Ras Mohamed, the Thistlegorm and the Blue Hole. The weather and water temperature make it possible to dive the whole year around and the mountain range of South Sinai is one of the most beautiful places I ever have seen in my life. I have chosen Egypt as well because of its lovely Egyptian and Bedouin people I work and live with. Especially Dahab is very unique – there is a great community of Egyptians, Bedouins and foreigners that will make you fall in love with this place.

 

PADI Women’s Dive Day – An Interview with Chris Azab

 

As PADI Women’s Dive Day is getting ever closer, we will be interviewing some leading figures in the diving industry in Egypt.

Chris Azab is a PADI Course Director, who has been a PADI member since 2001 and a PADI Course Director since 2009.

When did you fall in love with the ocean?

When I was a child, after school time, I always went to the beach to play and swim in the sea (I was living in Holland, nearby the North Sea). In 1992 it was the first time to visit Sharm el Sheikh and the Red Sea and I felt in love with it when I was snorkelling in Naáma Bay and Sharks Bay. The beautiful colours of the Coral, the beautiful colours of the fish. Each year I went back to the Red Sea.

How did you start diving?

After snorkelling in the Red Sea I wanted to see and learn more. I had a chance to do a DSD in Holland and I continued and followed all the courses from the PADI Ladder.

When did you become a PADI instructor?

In 2001 I became a PADI Instructor and was teaching for hobby. I started a Dive Club in Holland and in one year I had 75 members and all the time happy faces. We did dives in the cold waters of the Grevelingen and the Oosterschelde. You can see all different kind of fish and a lot of crabs and lobsters. I wanted to be underwater all the weekends. In 2004 I had the change to change my life and start living, diving and teaching in Sharm el Sheikh – Egypt. I followed my dream and my passion about diving and made from my hobby my fulltime job and I’m still loving it.

Why did you become a PADI Course Director?

Even when I was fulltime working in the Diving Industry in Egypt, I loved to do each year some courses myself and in 2009 I had the chance to do the Course Director Training Course as the next step in my carrier. I love to teach different courses and like to bring divers to a higher level. Now I’m teaching IDC’s and all different Instructor Specialties in different countries, in Sharm el Sheikh by 5* IDC Center Sinai Dive Club, in Holland by 5* IDC Center Divepost and 5* IDC Center Souldivers and in Cyprus by 5* IDC Center Cydive. It’s not the only thing I do. I teach all TEC Courses which I prefer to do in Sharm. From the shore you can easily dive to 65 meter. Sidemount diving is one of my favourites. It’s also amazing to teach the new Adaptive Support and Adaptive Techniques Diver Specialty, which I have planned again in September in Sharm el Sheikh.

 

What would you tell our readers especially women who are interested in diving?

Ladies, I still dive for fun. Last week I was on a diving Holliday in Tenerife by PADI Dive Center Ola Diving. The Atlantic Ocean surprised me as well. We saw Dolphins, Turtles, schools of Barracuda’s and Triggerfish, Morays, Bullrays etc. etc. So ladies, go diving and start today!!! It will change your life. You will become part of a different world, will see beautiful creations. Diving transforms you to another human, it’s a challenge, it’s relaxation and it’s amazing to be underwater. It doesn’t matter if you dive in cold water or warm water, it’s the feeling of freedom. Come and visit the Red Sea, it’s a great and safe place to be. Just be careful, you can become addicted to diving and the Red Sea like I did.

Why did you chose to work in Egypt as a PADI professional?

Since I started diving I went to different diving destinations, not only to the Red Sea. As you can read above, I felt in love with the Red Sea, the National Park of Ras Mohammed, the Reefs by Tiran Island, it’s amazing because every day, every dive it’s different. There are also lots of beautiful local Dive sites. That’s why I wanted to work in Sharm el Sheikh, I did and it became my home. Nowadays I’m not only working in Egypt, anyway I can tell you, once a Sharmer, always a Sharmer.

Earth Day – Sunday 22nd April

On Sunday 22nd April, the Prodivers team and guests of Hurawalhi joined the largest civic-focused day of action in the world – Earth Day! The campaign for Earth Day 2018 was ‘End Plastic Pollution’, a movement dedicated to providing information and inspiration needed to fundamentally change human attitude and behaviour towards plastics.


Plastics are a substance the earth cannot digest. The very qualities that made plastics such an attractive material initially; durable, flexible, versatile and inexpensive, have ultimately generated rubbish with staying power – a huge environmental issue. Our voracious appetite for plastic goods, coupled with our tendency to discard, litter and thus pollute, has led to an estimated 8 million tonnes of plastic entering our oceans every year. Plastics not only threaten our wildlife through entanglement, ingestion and habitat disruption, but their ability to absorb chemicals and accumulate in the human food chain has also led to plastics negatively affecting human health.


So, instead of diving with sharks or snorkelling with manta rays, the 48th Earth Day saw Hurawalhi staff and guests dive and snorkel for debris instead! They were let loose to clean up as much plastic and rubbish they could find off a nearby reef. Whilst they may have made only the tiniest dent in removing some of the debris currently be in our oceans, every action counts. There are so many simple ways to reduce plastic consumption in our day-to-day lives, here are some of the tips our Marine Biologist, Kirsty, shared with all of our volunteers this Earth Day:

1. Refrain from using plastic straws, even in restaurants. If a straw is a must, purchase a reusable one.

2. Forget the plastic bag. Purchase a reusable produce bag and be sure to wash them often.

3. Give up gum. Chewing gum is made of a synthetic rubber, i.e. plastic.

4. Ditch bottles for boxes. Often, products like laundry detergent come in cardboard which is more easily recycled than plastic.

5. Leave the single-use plastic bottles on the shelf. Use a reusable bottle or mug for your beverages, even when ordering from a to-go shop.

6. Don’t buy foods in plastic containers e.g. berries, tomatoes etc. Ask your local grocer to take your plastic containers back.

7. Disregard the disposable nappy. Use cloth nappies to reduce your baby’s carbon footprint and save money.

8. Stop purchasing single serving products. Buy bulk items instead and pack your lunch in reusable containers and bags.

9. Refuse to buy disposable razors and toothbrushes. Purchase replaceable blades instead.

Abstain from buying frozen foods. Even though those that appear to be packaged in cardboard are coated in a thin layer of plastic, plus you’ll be eating fewer processed foods.

A great quote from Marine Biologist, Sylvia Earle, sums up perfectly the importance of looking after the ocean: ‘No water, no life. No blue, no green’

PADI’s guest blogger Kirsty introduces herself:

Growing up in Mallorca, surrounded by the riches of the Mediterranean Sea, Kirsty’s ambition to pursue a career in marine biology was ignited from a young age. Kirsty completed both her undergraduate and postgraduate degrees at Newcastle University in England. During her studies she had the opportunity to conduct fieldwork in the Bahamas, Bermuda and the Maldives. It is not surprising then that her research interests to date have focused on tropical reef ecology. More specifically, Kirsty is interested in studying the movement patterns and habitat use of sharks and rays. Kirsty is currently part of the Maldivian Manta Trust research team, collecting data around the country’s manta population, its movements, and how the environment and tourism / human interactions affect them.

 

 

Take Part in the Fourth Annual PADI Women’s Dive Day on Saturday 21 July 2018

For the past three years, divers from every corner of the globe have come together for PADI Women’s Dive Day to bond over their love of the ocean and a passion for diving. This growing tradition will continue on 21 July 2018, further strengthening and supporting the female dive community through a day of fun, adventure and camaraderie.

PADI Dive Centers and Resorts hosted more than 884 events in 85 countries last year for the third annual PADI Women’s Dive Day on 15 July 2017. Since the 2015 inaugural event, the celebration has continued to gain momentum as new and experienced divers gear up for everything from high tea on the high seas to shark dives and underwater cleanups. As a result, PADI female certifications increased noticeably year over year.

This was possible thanks to the enthusiasm and participation from PADI Members around the world who got behind this initiative. Let’s do it again for 2018, only bigger. More new divers. More ambassadors for the underwater world.

Participate in PADI Women’s Dive Day 2018 to strengthen and grow the female dive community, attract new women to the sports of scuba diving and freediving, and motivate existing female divers to get back in the water and continue their dive training.


Start planning your 2018 PADI Women’s Dive Day event on 21 July 2018 using these simple steps. 

  1. Decide what type of event to host. The type of event to host is completely up to you! Whether you conduct PADI Women’s Dive Day themed courses, have a family-oriented open day, host fun dives or even a girls’ night out with your divers, only your imagination limits your event.
  2. PADI Retail and Resort Members, register your event on the PADI Women’s Dive Day Event Locator. By registering your event, your dive center/resort will be included on the Event Locator at padi.com/women-dive.  To register your event, ensure you are logged into the Pros’ Site with your PADI Dive Center or Resort account (not an Individual Member account), go to ‘My Account’ page of the PADI Pros’ Site, and click on ‘Register your Women’s Dive Day event(s)’. Follow the on-screen instructions to quickly and easily add your event.
  3. PADI Professionals hosting an event not affiliated with a dive center/resort are encouraged to share their event information with their regional PADI office (PADI Americas: [email protected]; PADI Asia Pacific: [email protected]; PADI EMEA: [email protected]).
  4. Promote your event. Use different platforms to help get the word out about your event – email, social media, advertisements (print, online and in-store), and event calendars. Be sure to tag your social posts with #padiwomen to be part of the global conversation.
  5. Post Event Follow-Up. Follow up with all your PADI Women’s Dive Day event participants afterward. A simple “thanks for being with us” keeps divers engaged and encourages them to continue diving with you. Don’t forget to include links, telephone and a call to action. And be sure your success stories and photos with the marketing team at your PADI Regional Headquarters! Tag event photos that you post on social media with #padiwomen to feed into PADI’s social channels.

PADI Retail and Resort Members: Register your 2018 PADI Women’s Dive Day event now!